Introduction: Folding Garage Counter From a Door.

Picture of Folding Garage Counter From a Door.

I wanted to put a workbench in my garage, but did not have room to put it.  I then came up with the idea of using an old door I had around the house and scrap 2x4's and a wall that that I could not have something permanent because I it is where I park my car. 

A nice bonus of this is that all the wood and door were scrap so I didn't have to buy anything for this counter.

This instructable was easy to make and only took a couple of hours form beginning to end.  The tools I used was a power saw and a cordless drill.

Step 1: Setting Up the Wall.

Picture of Setting Up the Wall.

First I placed a 2x4 on the wall that I would use for counter.  This wall is 62 inches long between the stairs going up and a closet.  I placed the 2x4 36 inches off the wall on one side and then using a level, I lined up the other side.  I secured the 2x4 with 3" grabber screws into studs in the wall.

Step 2: Buildint the Counter From a Door.

Picture of Buildint the Counter From a Door.

The door was a inside hollow door full sized door 30 " wide.I cut the door down to 60".
using the hinges, I connected to another 2x4 that was 62" long

Step 3: Mounting the Counter

Picture of Mounting the Counter

I took the 2x4 that I had mounted to the door and screwed it directly to the 2x4 I mounted on the wall.  Because the 2x4 on the wall is level, I just had to make sure the 2 2x4's lined up.

Having 2 2x4's to mount the counter gives you additional space to place things on them such as a power strip.  I have a plug right above the counter to work with, but if I am using lot of items, a power strip would be helpful.

Step 4: Making Legs for the Stands.

Picture of Making Legs for the Stands.

Being true to having this cost nothing, i found old tx4's and cut them up to the size needed for the height of the leg.  In my case, it was 34 1/4" high.

Where the width of the door was 30" wide and the wall was 62" long Each leg would be 30" wide.

My garage has a slope in it so the one side of the counter was taller than the other. In my case, it was 35" high on the other side.

Using some hinges, I secured the legs to the wall.

Step 5: Using the Counter

Picture of Using the Counter

When not in use, it folds against t the wall.  When in use, I have plenty of workspace available.


I drilled some 1/2 inch holes on the sides which gives me the ability to put in a arm style lamp from my other workbench without having to clam and unclamp the holder.  It is nice to add additional lighting when needed.

Comments

joelhunn (author)2013-03-12

Nice and simple (I always over-engineer everything!) I will be using your design, thanks!

knorseth (author)joelhunn2013-03-12

Since I made it, I have drilled some 1/2" holes on the side so I could place a arm lamp on the desk. I was considering getting me a new grinder with a light, but this has worked I don't need to replace my grinder yet. I updated the last page to show the counter with the lamp attached.

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