Introduction: Framed Pendant

Picture of Framed Pendant

I make jewelry and pens out of wood. Wood is such an exciting medium, each piece is different and there are countless varieties. Two pieces cut from the same piece can be totally different.

Today I'm going to make a pendant out of flame box elder. I'll add accents of wenge and maple and then frame it in walnut.

You can see other examples of my work in my store here.

Step 1: What You'll Need

Picture of What You'll Need

Here is the piece of flame box elder, some walnut and a piece of maple veneer and a piece of wenge veneer.

you'll also need:

wood glue

sandpaper..I use 80. 120, 220, 400 and 600 grits

wood finish...I use George's Clubhouse Wax from Woodcraft

A saw for cutting the wood....I use a band saw

A utility knife to cut the veneer

Something to drill the pendant...I use my lathe because it's almost impossible to drill straight through the pendant with anything else.

Step 2: Pick the Part of the Wood You'll Want for the Pendant.

Picture of Pick the Part of the Wood You'll Want for the Pendant.

Here I've picked an interesting part of the wood. There are browns and reds against tan. There is also a knot for more visual interest.

Decide what part you're going to use, mark it and cut it out. Now, sand the four edges until they are flat and perpendicular.

Step 3: Glue on the Wenge Accent

Picture of Glue on the Wenge Accent

Cut two pieces of the wenge veneer just a little wider and longer than the long edges of the pendant and glue then on. After the glue sets, trim the ends flush with the short sides of the pendant. Now, cut two pieces of the wenge veneer just longer and wider than the short edges. Glue then on.

Wait for the glue to set. Now it gets tricky so pay attention to what your're doing.You're going to trim the veneer you just glued, so that they're flush with the long sides. BE VERY CAREFUL. If you sand off any of the veneer on the sides, you'll ruin the design and you'll need to sand everything you've glued on and start over.

Step 4: Now Do the Same With the Maple Veneer

Picture of Now Do the Same With the Maple Veneer

BE VERY CAREFUL. If you sand off any of the veneer that's already glued on, you'll ruin the design and you'll need to sand everything you've glued on and start over.

Cut two pieces of the maple veneer just a little wider and longer than the long edges of the pendant and glue then on. After the glue sets, trim the ends flush with the short sides of the pendant. Now, cut two pieces of the maple veneer just longer and wider than the short edges. Glue then on.

Wait for the glue to set. Now, trim the veneer you just glued, so that they're flush with the long sides.

Step 5: Glue on the Walnut Frame

Picture of Glue on the Walnut Frame

BE VERY CAREFUL. If you sand off any of the veneer that's already glued on, you'll ruin the design and you'll need to sand everything you've glued on and start over.

Cut two pieces of the walnut just a little wider and longer than the long edges of the pendant and glue then on. After the glue sets, trim the ends flush with the short sides of the pendant. Now, cut two pieces of the walnut just longer and wider than the short edges. Glue them on.

Step 6: Sand, Drill and Sand Again.

Picture of Sand, Drill and Sand Again.

The veneer and frame you glued on are wider than the pendant. Now is the time to sand both sides flush.

Next, it's time to drill. This is impossible with a hand drill and nearly impossible with a drill press because these small drill bits tend to wander quite a bit and blowing out the side has a high probability of happening.

I drill these on my lathe. First I mark both sides where I will drill the hole. Then I use a punch (or a nail) to make a small indentation to start the hole. I then put the drill bit in one indentation and the tailstock center in the other. Now turn on the lathe and advance the quill. That starts the hole.Drill halfway through then reverse the piece and drill the rest of the way from the other side.

When you've finished drilling it's time to sand all 6 sides, starting with the course grit and ending with the 600.

Step 7: Finish It Up

Picture of Finish It Up

Now I apply the wax. Apply it generously, let it sit. Then wipe off the excess and polish with a soft cloth. You can use it as the centerpiece of a string of beads or alone on a string, whatever suits you.

Comments

NathanSellers (author)2014-12-01

This is beautiful. Well done.

Battlespeed (author)2014-11-30

Why not measure, cut and drill the pieces before gluing everything up?

An interesting idea, I don't think most people have the tools and ability to cut wood to such close tolerances, I know I don't. Veneer varies, but most is about 1/40" thick. If you pre-cut the pieces and were off half that distance, there would be noticeable gaps, In my opinion, you would need a machine shop to reach the proper tolerances. That would add considerable time for set-up, require expensive tools and overall, increase the cost of the finished product.
But most importantly, that would put the project out of the reach of more people. The idea, here, is to is to bring projects that people can make. The more accessible the project, the better

I appreciate your taking the time to comment..

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