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Time to recycle your bicycle! From a bikepedal I made this raising hammer to try and make some raised plate armour.

Step 1: Tools & Materials

Tools:

Hammer

Anvil

Forge

Cutoff hardy tool

Tongs

Hacksaw

Materials:

Bike crank

Hammer handle / stick / steel tube

Step 2: Remove the Unwanted Stuff

So if your scrap bike has been standing in the rain for a few years you might encounter the same problem as me, rust. Although the photos may not show it, the nut was stuck on the bolt so badly the corners of the nut just stripped off. The solution I used was to simply cut off as most of the plastic as I could and burn off the remainder.

After this toxic barbeque (seriously dont burn plastic unless you have to) the real smithing can begin! First off I heated the end with the bolt to redhot and, using my cuttoff hardy tool, I chopped off the bolt and its eye.

Step 3: Making the Head

Next I started making the hammerhead. Heat up the end that used to hold te pedal, move it over to your anvil using some tongs and mushroom the end until it has the size you want. This is quite a chunk of steel so it will probably take a few reheats, take your time.

Step 4: Fixing the Angle

Now that your hammer has a head, it needs to be aligned with the handle. Most bike cranks will have an angle, so just heat it near the other end. When everything gets nice and hot use you anvil and hammer to straigthen out the hammer head.

I used a piece of scrap pipe I had lying around to check the angle, just hammer one end to make it square(ish) and jammed it in the eye of the hammerhead.

It might take a few heatings to straighten out everything, just keep in mind the straigther you get it the better centered your swings will be later on!

Step 5: Sanding

If you really need this step explained you might want to stay away from fire altogether...... just remember that any marks left on your hammer head will be stamped into your working piece on each hit.

Step 6: (Failed) Hammer Handle Construction

Alright, so I took the pictures so why not add them to show you what not to do!

First off, I took a branch that had been dead way too long(big mistake), cut it to size, then I used a pen to transfer the eye of the hammerhead onto the end of my (highly refined) stick.

Next, using a hacksaw, I took off some of the unwanted bits and then delicately jammed it in to the hammerhead by brute force.

The last step would have been to hammer in a (home made) nail to secure the head to the handle, alas, the "handle" split. This is where the (big mistake) comes in, the old wood just shattered. Now onto the fix!

What I ended up doing was to just take a piece of pipe taken from the same scrap bike, slid it into the hammerhead an drove it down with a few good hits with a 3 pound hammer.

Step 7: Finished

And its done! It might not be the prettiest hammer but I love it all the same! Time to start hitting some glowing metal again.

<p>Thanks. A nice way to make something from scrap.</p>
<p>The rest of the bike I mostly used the frame for tubing to make my bellows / forge. The other crank is being transformed into a broken back seax. I kind of regret ever starting that project, the steel used in bike cranks is really REALLY tough metal, so each heating only moves a minimal amount of steel. Will keep a good edge in the end though.</p><p>cheers, knut.</p>
<p>nice. You are working with fire and barefoot?</p>
<p>ofcourse! nothin like some dirt and molten slag between your toes! also dont forget the large pieces of glowing steel and hammers flying around! </p>

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