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Time for my bi annual car front wheel suspension inspection. The tools involved are;

Pair of gloves.

Cordless drill with 1/2inch socket Adapter.

1/2inch Ratchet with 17mm deep socket.

Aluminum tube. 32mm socket.

OEM car jack.

17mm wheel nut adapter.

Step 1: SLACKEN THE WHEEL NUTS.

Using the aluminum tube and Ratchet with 17mm deep socket and nut adapter, I slackened the nuts.

Step 2: RAISING THE CAR.

First I pulled the handbrake up. Then I used my drill and 32mm socket to quickly raise the car to lift the wheel off the ground.

Step 3: REMOVING THE TIRE.

Using the drill I quickly removed the wheel nuts. I normally place the tire under the car near the oem jack.

Step 4: INSPECTION.

The lower ball joint, lower/upper control arms and the shock absorber all look good. The same was observed on the other side.

Step 5: PUTTING BACK ON THE TIRE.

Putting back the tire was easy. I used the drill in screw mode with the torque stop so I won't wring my hand when the nut stopped. I made sure to tighten the nuts in diagonal pattern. I repeated the same exercise for the other front tire. Both sides are in good state so I'm quite happy.
<p>Some nuts can be really &quot;stubborn&quot;. I find that a 24&quot; &quot;breaker bar&quot; (socket handle) greatly helps. Sometimes the the resistance seems so much that the socket might split or an aluminum tube will bend - blame that on the commercial garages. Putting a square of good plywood under the jack's foot plate also advisable whether you are on earth or pavement. BTW, do many cars use &quot;Allen&quot; type lug nuts, if that is what it looks like?</p>
Great points! Yes you can replace your wheel nuts with the Allen key type. Easily available on Amazon.com. I much rather the oem type though.
<p>My car's OEM nuts are made to go with the imitation alloy plastic wheel caps. The steel wheels were black originally, so just gave them little red accents. Also liked your idea of using the electric drill to &quot;power&quot; the jack. I'll just need to buy a 17mm hex socket bit. BTW, in a small industrial machinery building company I worked for. we used mostly Allen head screws on assemblies.</p>
<p>I love what you did with your wheels! I was forced to use the Allen nuts when I bought the alloy rims. For the oem jack I use a 32mm socket and a 1/2inch adapter to fit into the chuck of my drill. Makes lifting and dropping the car so easy! The appropriate size of socket to fit onto your car jack may be different from the size I used but you get the idea.</p>

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