Introduction: Fuzzy Footies Out of Old Blankets!

Picture of Fuzzy Footies Out of Old Blankets!

Using old blankets, fuzzy winter pajamas can be made without a pattern! These warm footies are sure to impress.

Step 1: "Making" the Pattern

Picture of "Making" the Pattern

For this project you will need:

2 fuzzy old blankets

A sewing machine (you could hand sew this, but it would take an incredibly long amount of time)

Sewing pins

Scissors

Hot Glue

Velcro

Puffy Paint or 3D fabric paint

To start this sewing project, you will need to find two soft blankets that don't have any other purpose than sitting around and filling space. Place one blanket on top of the other blanket, and make sure the blankets are lined up well. A model will be needed to lie on the blankets. Trace around your model, adding 3 or 4 inches of extra material around their figure. I wanted my pajamas to have a sort of "harem" pant essence, so I made the crotch of the "pants" occur at about knee level. Do not include arms in your tracing; simply skip the arms when tracing and continue tracing the torso. The cut out figure should look like a sleeveless unitard.

Step 2: Adding the Arms

Picture of Adding the Arms

Measure the length of your arm from your shoulder to your wrist. This will be the length of your sleeves. Measure your arm's circumference at its widest point. This will be the width of your sleeve (this makes the circumference of the sleeve twice the circumference of your arm. It makes a very comfortable and fairly loose fit). Draw two rectangles with the dimensions earlier measured (the circumference of your arm as the width and the length of your arm as the length). For example, say the length of an arm was 20 inches and the circumference of that arm was about 10 inches, the rectangles would be 20 inches x 10 inches. These rectangles should be on the scrap material in which the blankets are already lined up on top of each other, so two rectangles make two sleeves. Cut out both of these rectangles, making sure to cut out both blankets with each rectangle.

Step 3: Cutting Out the Neck

Picture of Cutting Out the Neck

Find the center of the top of your "unitard" (the first piece that you cut out). From that center, make a few marks 5 inches away from that point to form a semi-circle. This makes a fairly large neck hole, so if you want a smaller neck hole, you can make the measurement 4 inches instead of 5. Cut this half circle out.

Step 4: Sewing the Body Piece

Picture of Sewing the Body Piece

From the top of the shoulder of the "unitard", make a mark the width of your sleeve away from the top. Remember: this should be the circumference of your arm. The first picture shows what should be sewn from this body piece. Pin these areas, and sew accordingly with the sewing machine, right sides facing in.

Step 5: Sewing the Arms

Picture of Sewing the Arms

From the two rectangles that you cut out earlier, sew the lengths of the arms with the sewing machine, right sides facing in. Do not sew the widths.

Step 6: Sewing the Arms to the Body Piece

Picture of Sewing the Arms to the Body Piece

With right sides still facing in for both pieces (the "unitard" and the sleeves), pin the sleeves to their appropriate places on the body piece. Sew these pieces together.

Step 7: Adding the "Opening"

Picture of Adding the "Opening"

At the center of the neck hole, make a small mark. Cut a line directly downward from that mark for the desired length of your opening. Cut two very small incisions perpendicular to the line you just cut at the end of the cut. Fold the material outward from the long cut and pin (third picture). Sew these folds down, hemming the opening. Turn the piece right side out. Add Velcro to the edge of this cut, putting different sides of Velcro on opposite opening sides. I used "sticky" Velcro reinforced with hot glue. Sew on Velcro would work great for this step as well, but it would take a little bit longer.

Step 8: Making the Feet

Picture of Making the Feet

Place your foot on the scrap fabric. Trace around your foot, adding an extra inch or so to the outline. Cut this out, flip it horizontally, and trace it again on the scrap fabric. These will be the soles of your footies. Place a cut out sole on the fabric again, and trace around it, adding an inch to the outline (as shown in the second picture). Cut this out. Flip this larger "sole" over horizontally, and trace again. For both of these "larger" soles, cut them in half horizontally, so they resemble only the top of a foot. Line the edges of the larger half foot with the edges of the smaller foot. There should be some slack in the middle. Pin these together and sew. Measure the outline of the part of the foot that is not sewn (as shown in the fifth picture). Make two rectangles that are the length that you just measured by about 3 inches. Pin these, standing up, to the soles of the feet that are not sewn yet (as shown in the seventh picture). Sew these to the soles. I did not sew the feet inside out because the soft fabric makes it hard to see where the sewing lines are, and I thought it looked fine sewn right-side out. Finally, cut a v-shaped slit on the upper "larger half-foot", as shown in the eighth picture.

Step 9: Sewing the Feet to the Body

Picture of Sewing the Feet to the Body

Pin the feet on the bottom of the legs according to where they line up. Sew these pieces together. Again, I did not sew with the material inside-out because the blankets are thick enough that it looks good with the outside facing out.

Step 10: Adding the Puffy Paint

Picture of Adding the Puffy Paint

Because these blankets are very soft and slick, adding puffy paint to the soles of the footies reduces the chance of one falling down on wooden floors. I did this in a snowflake pattern. Let these dry overnight.

Step 11: Making a Matching Hat

Picture of Making a Matching Hat

This step, of course, is optional, but in the winter months, it is much needed (and altogether cute!). Measure the circumference of your head. Take that distance and put it on a single piece of fabric as shown in the second picture. Cut out a rectangle with this width and a length of the desired length of your hat. Fold this rectangle in half along the side that you measured. Make a diagonal line from the open edge of the rectangle to the opposite corner. Cut along this line. Turn the right faces in and sew along the diagonal line. Turn this right side out. This is the "cone" part of your hat.

Step 12: Adding the Bauble

Picture of Adding the Bauble

Take a square of scrap fabric, and fold in the sides to resemble a ball. Hot glue these sides, holding until the glue is dry. Lastly, hot glue this ball to the tip of your hat. Congratulations! You have now reincarnated old blankets into fuzzy and comfy footies! Now, hand me that mug of hot cocoa.

Comments

mr_marte (author)2015-02-17

Simply marvelous!!

Thank you! Thanks for checking it out!

shizy25 (author)2015-01-11

Very nice project, but I think the openning should be real long till the crotch so that going to the toilet won't be an issue. ;-)

Thank you! That is an excellent tip! I will have to try that on my next pair.

Devilkill4 (author)2015-01-04

Very creative :)

Thank you!

Kevin Lincoln (author)2015-01-02

yeaaaaa my girlfriend will be happy for this gift

Yay! Any girl would feel lucky to get these, especially because they have the love of a homemade object.

Bigglieboo (author)2014-12-31

Nice job!

meismeems (author)2014-12-30

This looks nice and comfy, great for those Midwest polar vortex days......but no back door for when nature calls??

Yes, these are very comfy! Please do add a "back door", and tell me how it works out! Thanks for checking it out!

andyk75 (author)2014-12-29

looks warm and comfortable. Thanks for sharing!

Thank you for checking it out!

grannyjones (author)2014-12-29

Try the puffy paint on an odd sock first. I discovered walking on a smooth floor was painful to my feet with puffy dots. I would smear the paint out so the puffiness is not pokiness.

ashleyjlong (author)grannyjones2014-12-29

Good point! I tried to re-sole a pair of slippers once and used puff paint for my anti-skid dots. I found that they remained a bit tacky for a while and would just slightly stick to the floor. Could have been the brand of paint I used...who knows. Definitely worth a test run beforehand!

Thanks for the helpful comments! 3D fabric paint worked well for me, but it is always good to test new materials.

violingirl (author)2014-12-29

These look soooo cozy!

I just might have to make some.

Please do! They feel like a panda hug (I, of course, have never been hugged by a panda, but I can imagine the furry sensation).

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