GO RUSTIC . . . . . BAKE IT IN a CAN!

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Introduction: GO RUSTIC . . . . . BAKE IT IN a CAN!

Finding things to decorate for a Halloween party is easy and fun!  I wanted to make something that I could not find on the Internet,  so I baked a muffin in an  aluminum ( not galvanized)  can and decorated the can!  I was not sure it could even be accomplished.  My first approach was a little disappointing so I tried it again and succeeded!  It was so fun! This instructable is how I made it.

Step 1: BLOOPERS!

I am a little embarrassed to share these bloopers, but I did it so you don't have to experience the great disappointment like I did.  Yours can be perfect the first the time around!  The cans I used were too tall and not large enough around.  I changed the can to a shorter, fatter can and that is just what I needed.  I added rocks in the bottom of the can, because I thought it was still a little bit too tall.  It turned out that it would have been fine, I just needed to add more batter.  I wanted it to look more like a mushroom.  So the next time I make these I will fill the can a little more.

Step 2: LIST OF SUPPLIES NEEDED FOR THIS INSTRUCTABLE.

  1. Tin cans one for each dinner guest. ( Aluminum not galvanized.  The way to tell is it won't attach to a magnet. )   If in doubt use Google search on cooking in a can.
  2. Pliers.
  3. Glue gun.
  4. Glue sticks.
  5. Small rocks if needed.
  6. Embellishments for the can:  Ribbon, cork, jute, buttons, miniature glasses, burlap, small silk flower, and small desert plate.
  7. Muffin mix or (recipe for muffin, cake, or bread.)
  8. Paper cupcake cups.
  9. Cookie sheet, not shown in picture.
  10. Silicone.

Step 3: PREPARING THE CAN

Clean the can being very careful not to cut yourself on the rim.  If you are concerned about that, first fix the sharp edge on the can by using a pair of pliers and then wash your can.  I washed the can first and then clamped the edge around the can.  Later we will be putting a finished edge around the can, so no one can get cut.
 

Step 4: PREPARING THE MUFFIN BATTER

If you are using a muffin mix, follow the directions on the box or find a recipe that you like. The only thing you will be doing differently is baking them in the tin can, as well as using a cookie sheet. Using paper cups will help to release the muffin more easily, so you can decorate the can.

Step 5: BAKING THE MUFFINS

Spoon the batter into the paper lined cans, slightly more than 3/4 full.  You might test one muffin to make sure you have the correct amount for the can, as well as the proper cooking time.  Cook according to the recipe's instructions. Remove from the oven and let set for five minutes.  Remove the muffins and wash the tin can.  Some of the muffin papers turned brown so I just replaced them with new ones.  
 

Step 6: DECORATING THE CAN

Here are just a few decorations to give you ideas of what you can use to decorate your cans.  For best results keep your decorations small and simple.  Before you decorate the cans make sure you have finished baking the muffins.  Remove the muffins.  Decorate your cans to compliment your theme.   Next use silicone to cover the rough edges of the inside of the can.  This will keep your guest safe. 

Step 7: DINNER GUEST WILL FEEL LOVED WITH ALL YOUR HARD WORK

Your dinner guest will feel loved with muffins made with such care and attention.  Your party is sure to be a huge success with all your hard work.  You don't have to spend a lot of money to have a party.  You can add elegance to the cans by adding shiny ribbon, crystals, or a small amount of lace.  

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28 Comments

Post 1950, tin cans are lined with plastic to prevent internal rust. Cooking your food in them could present a severe health hazard, releasing such chemicals as BSP-A and DEHA, at higher temps. which is why they don't recommend heating food in the can in the first place. You need to burn the plastic out before you try this, and even then, there's no guarantee that all of the chemicals are removed. I don't recommend doing this otherwise.

If you have a parakeet or any kind of bird, the plastic fumes may kill it!

Thanks so much for stopping by and do have a splendorous day!

sunshiine

This is great, i freaking love preparing food outside of what is expected. gotta start baking in cans

Thanks for your reply. It has been suggested not to use galvanized cans. The way to tell if a magnet sticks to it, it is galvanized. Thank you for your comment.

Cans/tins used for food storage are not galvanized (which is a zinc coating process; originally electroplating, but came to include zinc hot-dip). They are tin-plated. Testing with a magnet would tell you nothing about the zinc (or tin) plating on a can, since those are nonferrous/nonmagnetic metals. The magnet simply detects the steel.

Ordinary tin-plated cans are perfectly safe for baking; I've done it for years. I've never seen a galvanized food can; I don't know if such were ever made.

What you might have trouble with when using aluminum cans is the plastic coating (used because aluminum tends to react strongly with acidic foods). Since you use paper cups for this application, it shouldn't be an issue.

I have been making breads in cans for over 15 years, you can use any size, just do not go too big the middle might not get cooked.
Even your bloopers look good enough to eat.