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I got a scrap titanium rod with a canal and two transverse holes. God knows what it used to be. But I am pretty affirmative that it must be titanium. I can tell this from the anodizing color reaction(i ran a test) and its unique luster!

This titanium rod had a tapered end and looked exactly like a pen. More coincidentally, the gel-ink pen refill filled just right and tight into the canal of this rod. After confriming its titanium composition, I conceived to make in into a pen, a tactical one which can break glasses in case of emergency.

Step 1: Fixing the Hard Alloy Tip

I just can't understand howcome there are so many "tactical pens" which claimed to be able to break glass or windshield but is made of weak and soft materials like aluminum.

To break tempered glass windshield , hard matals is essential.

I found several tungsten carbide cones to serve this purpose.These little cones are originally used in the lather as a core clamper. They are hard enough to scratch glass and in the mean time strong enough to withstand necessary hit.

Now that the ideal material arrived, I enlarged the canal a little bit then hammered it into the canal with a piece of wood. The cone would not go further in longitudinaly cuz I enlarged the canal with a limited depth. Neither would it move side to side nor even drop cus i ground the canal carefully to make them fit just well.

Step 2: The Tip Holder

The original rod had a tapered end but the taper just ended halfway.

To make it like a pen, we need to make a tip continuous with the taper curve of the rod, and it must be hollow to hold the refill. I name this little stuff "tip holder".

The tip holder was made out of a TC4 rod. This is the most painstaking procedure, for I have no access to a lather delicate enough to process such a little piece. Except for drilling the canal, I have to do it with vise and files.

I didn't do any screw thread, friction hold this little tip very well to the rod.

Step 3:

Finally the pen is assembled.(Sorry for the ugly refill, i just made it leak by hitting the bottom against some stuff )

Before that I added a clip to it to make it more like a pen.

Yes u are right, I didn't find a decent cap for it . Pls do let me know if u have any idea about the cap.

Actually, the hard alloy bottom is more useful in marking the metal pieces, which is 50/50 purpose of the design.

Thanks for viewing.

I'd really appreciate it if you can provide any suggestions!

<p>FYI Windshields are not made of tempered glass, but side windows are, this would not work on windshields as they are laminated or sandwiched two pieces of glass with a plastic in between them.</p>
So we need an extra saw or sort of thing to cut it open after making a hole in it?
oh and you are going to need a thick leather glove if you actually are going to use it to break a side window it will take multiple hits and your hand will go through it and get gut.
Stoveman, we used a &quot;glasmaster&quot; to remove the windshield, before cutting the roof off. It has a point on the handle like an ice axe to bash through the 2 layers of glass and 3 layers of plastic. Then you use the saw blade to cut through all the layers of laminated windshield.
<p>Cool</p>
From what I can see, that was originally an intramedullary nail. That is a long rod that is hammered into a bone (usually the tibia) after the marrow has been drilled out, so fittings such as artificial knees can be attached. Great 'ible, by the way!
btw, people always say that titanium is a &quot;space metal&quot;. I'm wondering is the titanium alloy you use to build the shell of spaceships the same as that the doctors use to insert into bones?
Titanium usually is known as a &quot;space metal&quot; because it is light, strong, and resistant to heat. However, it's terribly expensive, and its properties are shared with other, more prominent metals such as aluminum. Spacecraft bodies tend to be steel and aluminum, and occasionally titanium will find itself in spacecraft as an aluminum-magnesium-titanium alloy. Titanium is usually reserved for applications where extreme strength and low density is required (such as in diving instruments), or where bioinertness and durability is necessary (medical implants). It also has a tendency to become explosive and catch fire when exposed to liquid oxygen (the fuel for most rockets), which, of course, is entirely undesirable. Thanks for your interest!
wow, thx dude, you really refreshed my knowledge. I used to think that the shell of spacecraft is titanium covered with some ceramic to sustain the burning in the atmosphere.
Wow!Thanks for telling me that. Fortunately I sanded and anodized it before the making, otherwise it may bring germs or viruses lol. <br>Are you a doctor or something likewise?
I'm not a doctor, just a curious scientist with an interest in all fields. I'm working to get P.h.Ds in astrophysics and aerospace engineering, actually!
U have a really wide range of knowledge!
Automotive vacuum caps for a tip cover come in all sizes &amp; are thick rubber.
<p>Could any body tell me what does the &quot;Featured&quot; sign mean? Is that a compliment from this website saying that my work have some feature?</p>
<p>Means it has been featured on the front page for a bit. Also puts yours higher up in search results. Congrats</p>
Wow, that's great. Thanks for replying.

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