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In this instructable, I will walk you through making a DIY Golden Goddess Horned Headdress. It is relatively simple to make and can be put together in just a couple hours. If you are looking for a statement piece, a headdress is a fabulous option. It can add some intrigue to any outfit and is great for festivals and photo shoots.

Step 1: Supply List

Gather together the following items:

E6000

Duct Tape

1 Can Gold Spray Paint

1 Pair of Horns

1 Spool of Ribbon

1/8 Yard of 1/2 inch Thick Foam

16 Gauge Craft Wire

1 Lomey Pedestal Holder

Floral Wire

Scissors

Wire Cutters

Hot Glue Gun

Glue Sticks (4-6 mini sticks)

1 Bunch (5 stems) Golden Hydrangeas

2 Cream Hydrangeas

1 Delia

5-6 Rose Budding Stems

4 Open Rose Stems

1 Cream Grass Bunch

2 Golden Amaranthus

2 Rusty Brown Amaranthus

2 Autumn Leafy Stems

You should be able to find everything at your local craft store with the exception of the horns and the pedestal holder. Some craft stores may have the pedestal holder, but many do not carry them. If you seem unable to get your hands on one, you can always make one with some duct tape and dry foam.

Step 2: Painting the Horns

In a well ventilated area, spray paint the horns per the manufacturer's directions. Apply as many coats as needed to hide the original color. You can move on to the next step between coats of paint. Once the horns are dry, do one last check to make sure they are fully painted from every angle. If you find a spot that is lacking, apply more paint and leave to dry. My horns took three applications before I was satisfied with the color from every angles. I think I could have had it in two applications, but I didn't want to get hasty and end up with a paint drip

Step 3: Building the Base

Ideally, you will want the individual the headdress is for present. If they are not available, you can use your own head for the mold or that of a willing friend. I am using a mannequin, as it is the easiest way for me to show the process. Should you own a mannequin and elect to use it, check the sizing as you go to be sure it will also fit your head properly. Gather the foam, ribbon, scissors, wire cutters, E6000 and duct tape.

Step 4: Base Phase I

Starting an inch or so past center, on your models head, bend the wire down towards the ear. At about the ear, bend the wire back up, over the head and down to the other ear. Bend the wire again, this time, going back towards the center of the head. You will want there to be an inch or two of overlap where the wire meets. Cut the excess wire. It should roughly resemble a head band.

Take a short strip of duct tape and wrap it around where the wires meet. The tape only needs to wrap around the two wires a few times. Place the newly formed band back onto the head. Form the, pressing it against the head till it sits snug to the head.

Taking a hold of the wire, mold another piece for around the base of the head. It should run about ear to ear. Most importantly, it should run below the curvature of the head. If it is too high, the headdress will easily fall off when the wearer looks downward. You will want to bend the ends up to attach to the previously formed band.

Take small strips of duct tape and attach it to the band. Check the fit and make any adjustments as needed.

Make two more attachments at the top of the head connecting the front and back of the band. Space the two connections 1-2 inches apart connecting them to the frame with duct tape.

Step 5: Base Phase II

Cut the foam into one inch wide strips. You will need enough length to cover all of the wire frame. Put some E6000 on the end of your ribbon and on the end of the foam. Starting at a joint, fold the foam around the wire. With the foam around the wire, start wrapping the ribbon around the foam. Carefully move around the frame, closing the foam and wrapping in ribbon.

Once you reach the end of each section, put some E6000 on the foam and the ribbon's end. Hold the freshly glued end for about a minute before moving on to the next section.

When the entire frame is padded and wrapped, check to fitting again.

Note: If you cannot find foam, it is not necessary. I add it, as I believe, it adds a little extra comfort.

Step 6: Horns Attachment Phase I

Once your horns are adequately dry, attach them to the pedestal holder. You will want to tighten the band that holds the horns together. This can be done by simply untying the strap and retying at the desired size.

Poke a small piece of wire through the pedestal holder being sure it goes around some plastic. Through a premade hole on the horn, attach the horn to the pedestal holder. Make sure the wire is twisted tightly. Repeat for the opposite horn.

Step 7: Horns Attachment Phase II

It is now time to attach the pedestal to the base frame. Stick two pieces of wire through the pedestal holder, again, being sure that it passes around plastic. Wrap the wire around the top of the base frame securing firmly to the frame.

Place the headdress framing back on the model. Make any adjustments as needed.

Step 8: Decorating the Base

Gather together the flowers you wish to decorate the base and a glue gun. I listed in the supplies what flowers and the quantity I ended up using. You are free to use whatever flowers you like and in any color you desire. If you feel a little lost in picking your selection, you can use my list as a general guide of what to get.

Note: If you select seasonal flowers, at the end of the season, you can purchase them for up to 80% off. I often go at the end of a season and stock up for future projects.

Step 9: Hiding the Base

Starting in the front and working around, use a glue gun to attach leaves to the base frame. In the back, you can glue the leaves to each other, allowing them to lay smoothly around the back of the head.

Step 10: Drooping Flowers

Place drooping flowers or greens on both sides of the head. I used amaranthus. Hold the stem at the desired location to determine where the stem should be cut. Cut the stem and slide into the pedestal holder.

Step 11: Hydrangeas

Cut the hydrangeas from the bunch to desired length. Insert the stems into the pedestal holder. Try to make them as balanced as possible

Step 12: Cream Grass

Part the grass out to smaller sections. I hit mine with a tough of the gold spray paint. Bend the wire in the grass stem so that it has a nice curve to hang down. Place a piece of grass on both sides of the back hydrangea. Place another one on the front of the headdress to the left side

Add the final hydrangea to front of the headdress. Place it low and to the center. If you are happy with the current placement of the flowers, add hot glue at the base of the stems. It doesn't take much to help hold them in place. Be sure not to cover the foam up to much as there are still more flowers.

Step 13: Roses

Start filling in the areas left void with the roses. If need be, give the rose stems a little bend here and there to get them to flow how you like. When you are satisfied with their placement, again, add hot glue around the stems.

Step 14: Dahlia & Cream Hydrangeas

Use the cream hydrangeas to fill in any remaining gaps. The hydrangeas, depending on the size, can be parted out. The ones I had could be dismantled into 3 parts, a center and two rings. The centers were used for the right and left side of the center rose in the back of the headdress. One of the remaining 4 rings was used around the dahlia which was placed in the center near the top of the front of the headdress. If you have small gaps that need filled, you can snip of small sections of the hydrangea and attach them to a new stem with wire. When everything is in place, add one last dose of glue around the steams. For this final phase of gluing, you can use the E6000 or the hot glue.

Step 15: Completed Golden Goddess Horned Headdress

I hope you have found this instructable helpful. I would love to hear what you created your headdress for and see your beautiful creations.

Thank you for the instructable!
<p>Oh my goodness, that just looks fantastic! Thank you so much for sharing your project! I really love seeing what people make. If you don't mind me asking, what did you make it for? </p>
<p>Thank you so much to everyone for supporting my instructable. I am extreamly excited about winning. I have wanted a sewing machine for a long time. I have been hand stitching projects or driving up to my parents house to use my mom's machine. Seriously, I am doing a happy dance that I am going to get to have my very own! I can't thank you all enough! :-) Best day ever! </p>
Congrats on the Grand Prize win!!! It's an awesome prize to be won...great job! Many blessings :)
<p>Thank you so much! I can't even start to describe how excited I am! :-) :-) :-) There were so many amazing hats and headpieces! </p>
<p>Wow that really was simpler than it looks. Well done!</p>
<p>Thank you, I am in the process of making another one but using a different technique. So far, it has been simple and the base is very cheap to make consisting primarily of foil and duct tape. I am hoping that people will see how simple it is and feel empowered to give it a go. </p>
<p>This looks amazing! And to be honest, it looks like it is supported by a much more complex structure!</p>
<p>Yes, I was very surprised when I started doing some research on making bases, at how simple they really are. Ideally, you would want to solder a frame, to be done at a top notch level....but this method is great for a DIY home project with minimal equipment and easy to find supplies. </p>
<p>Wow this is really stunning! You are very talented!</p>
<p>Thank you, that is so kind of you. </p>
<p>Absolutely Fabulous piece and an excellently written tutorial.</p><p>Great job! </p>
<p>Thank you very much. It was a lot of fun to make. I think it would be a blast to have a headdress crafting party. </p>
<p>Do you think this could be done with fresh flowers?</p>
<p>Funny you should ask, I was just thinking about that today. I do believe that you could make it with fresh flowers. The Lomey pedestal holder is actually for fresh flowers. You would need to soak it in water first. I would also use floral adhesive in place of the hot glue in securing the stems. Thanks for the great question!</p>
<p>Thanks for the great answer! What is floral adhesive? Can I get it at a normal craft store, or would I need to special order it?</p>
<p>Floral adhesive is a special glue made for working with fresh flowers to help secure them in the floral foam. I believe, I have purchased it at the local craft store, but don't recall which one. I know you can get it online via Amazon, Walmart or Etsy (from TheCraftCouple). I am actually heading out to Micheal's and maybe another craft store today. I will take a peek and see if they have any in the store. This adhesive is not clear. It is kind of an amber color. You will want to be careful not to get it where you don't want it. I find it is easier to work with a slightly old tub of adhesive. It will be pretty runny when you first open it. Sometimes, depending on the project, it helps if you squirt some out onto a paper plate and then dip the stem in the glue. If you have a flower with a tiny stem, like Gypsophila, you can dip the stem through the glue nozzle into the tube. You can also use the glue on non floral pieces in your arrangement, such as rhinestone picks. Hope this helps. </p>
<p>Thanks!!! I just keep imagining it done with fragrant real flowers. Maybe this spring when all my lilac bushes are blooming I'll give it a go.</p><p>Ha! Ha! Don't know where I would wear it though. I can imagine my neighbors giving me strange looks as I take the recycling out. :)</p>
<p>I did not see the floral adhesive in Micheal's or Joann's. I got mine at Howell's Home and Floral but I don't believe that is a chain store. If your friends with a local florist, I would bet they could get you some. I love the idea of a fragrant flowers headdress. Just an idea, you could use cedar and noble branches (which I love the smell of) with flowers, picks, or ornaments and make a holiday or New Years one to wear to a party!</p>
<p>Amazing! I love it, it's so beautiful :)</p>
<p>Oh my gosh, this is so gorgeous! I've attempted to make so many headdresses with various degrees of success, but never this nice! I'll have to try this technique!</p>
<p>Thank you, would love to hear if it works out for you. I have been doing more research and have some more ideas I would love to give a try. My weekends can not come fast enough :-) </p>
I am very sure you are going to win at least one of those contests with your status rates:)
<p>Absolutely stunning! Your instructable is very easy to understand and follow. I voted for you. Thank you for posting this. It has given me all kinds of ideas.</p>
<p>You are so welcome. I would love to see what you come up with!</p>
Very thorough instructable! Beautiful.
You are so kind I am following you
I voted for all three contests!
<p>Ohh my goodness, thank you so much! </p>
I really mean it it looks like flowers and gold had a baby:)
How beatific! I have not ever seen a headrests so beautiful!
<p>Thank you, that truly brings happiness to my heart! </p>
<p>This is really nice. It looks like professional costume artist level work.</p>
<p>Thank you! Headdresses are my current facination. I have started doing more research so I can perfect this artistry.</p>

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