Instructables
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Yet another camera tripod project with Loc-Line modular hose. This instructable owes its existence to the Gorilla Pod instructable by benthekahn. Before reading this one, read that one.

This extends and, hopefully, improves and simplifies the instructable mentioned above. This version of the tripod folds flat and allows for a variety of upper camera mounts. This increases the number of angles at which a (lightweight) camera can be held. It retains all of the advantages of the Loc-Line model -- flexibility, durability, and general coolness.
 
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Step 1: Blah Blah Blah

This step is here because the first step seems to appear below the Introduction. I don't understand why and I don't think it is a good idea.

Step 2: Tools and Materials

This project requires access to a few woodworking tools -- saws for shaping the base, drills for drilling the holes, grinder for shaping bolt heads. The only unusual tool I used was a 1/4" NPT tap. It is hard to believe the tap is called 1/4" because it looks at least 1/2" in diameter, but I believe the measurement refers to the inner diameter of the pipe/hose.

Loc-Line
This is interesting and fun stuff from ModularHose.com, master distributors of Loc-Line modular hose. Buy the pliers for assembling segments and connectors. Buy lots of this stuff because it just has to be useful for other projects. It's expensive enough that it better be useful.

41401 Loc-Line Hose Segment Pack for 1/4" system
41406 Loc-Line 1/4" NPT Connector for 1/4" system

Each tripod uses four (4) of the connectors (they come in four packs) and 24+ segments of hose (8 apiece for the three legs; additional pieces for extensions). Each two pack of hose contains 2 x 10 segments.

Base
The base can be of any material that can be tapped with a 1/4" NPT tap. I used a small block of mahogany (scrap that I had kicking around from a project from twenty-five years ago) but a chunk of wood, metal or plastic would work as well.
guyzo353 years ago
This is fantastic!!!  Few projects get me inspired enough to emulate them, and your presentation truly got to me. I work in a machine shop so I made my version out of spare parts (aka COMPLETELY FREE).

I used a plastic base 2"x2"x0.5" square, and did exactly what you said with the tapped holes.

One improvement on the connection between the screw and Locline piece: I used a 1/2" bolt (http://www.mcmaster.com/#cad-2d/91274a156/=dhu97a), McMasterCarr Part # 91274a156.

The head of the bolt is too large for the smaller hole of a Locline hose part, so I machined the hole to be a few thousands smaller than the diameter of the bolt head, put glue in the newly drilled hole, and press-fitted the bolt into the Locline hose.

I also added a 1/4-20 nut and lock washer, so that when the camera is screwed down all the way it stays in place and doesn't swivel.

Thanks for the awesome idea!


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matthewpoage (author)  guyzo353 years ago
Wow. Thank you. You certainly got the price of it right! Completely free! It seems as if the major complaint about Loc-Line is that it is too expensive -- which it is. However, I have found the flexibility to be valuable. It's interesting stuff that should be used more. Now, how much is that machine to drill a hole a few thousandths (of an inch) smaller than the diameter of the bolt head!?
Hahaha, that would a Bridgeport Milling Machine:

http://cgi.ebay.com/Milling-mill-machine-9x49-3HP-220V-electronic-variable-/110722348048?pt=BI_Mills&hash=item19c790f410#ht_1717wt_700

Extraordinarily expensive for the common layman, but infinitely useful if you have access to one.

There are machine shops in various places that allow access and memberships to use their machinery if you're interested:

http://techshop.ws/ (as an example)
hypd093 years ago
just checked out the loc line, its expensive.. buying a gorillapod would be cheaper(and better)
marinstruct3 years ago
It might be cool to fasten some rare earth magnets to the ends of the legs, so it would "stick" to ferrous surfaces. ...well, maybe not the roof of a moving car.
ernestmac133 years ago
Have you played with a Gorilla pad, they are pretty cool? I ask because, they have solid joints with a ring of rubber running around them, which along with their rubber feet help to prevent scratching what you wrap it around or set it on. I especially like the multiple heads, one standard 1/4", one with a suction cup for attaching a cell phone, and two with double sided sticky goo. The last one has goo similar to those hooks you put on the wall, that you pull on the tape to remove goo and all. The suction cup has mixed results, with my vary heavy Motorola droid phone. I need to contact Gorilla, for a better solution. Other than that, I'm happy with both my mini-Gorilla Pod, and the full sized one for full sized cameras and video cameras. I'm sure making the tripod was a great learning experience, which is what instructables is all about, but in that same line, I think determining which would actually function better for the dollars spent, is also important.
Very nice project, I'm fascinated with uses for loc-line as well. Where exactly did you buy your loc-line?
Try this link:

http://www1.mscdirect.com/CGI/GSDRVSM?PACACHE=000000166450128

Good luck.
sjoobbani3 years ago
I like this idea.
I noticed loc-line many years ago,
and I was going to use it in a sort of way to make a tripod
but not exaclty a tripod
You might also try adding stiff cable to the inside of the line-loc to give it strength and security.
I just thought of a nice modification, or addition. If you added a little alligator clip (or crocodile if you prefer) to the wood piece, it could be used to keep your hand strap out of the way. It could also be used to hold small things like maybe a flower stem or ring so that you could position them just the right way to take a shot. The clip would ideally be on some loc-line for holding stuff, but not necessarily loc-line if you just want to hold the strap.
zakamooza3 years ago
awesome project
brbenn3 years ago
Nice Innstructable!
Isn't it cheaper and better to actually buy the gorilla-pod, because those rubberised bits are much better than loc-line ?
matthewpoage (author)  steveastrouk3 years ago
Cheaper absolutely -- Loc-Line IS expensive. Better is subjective. If my goal was just to have a tripod like this, I would have simply bought a Gorilla Pod with price and convenience the determining factors. I do like, however, that I can modify this one should circumstances arise and I find Loc-Line intriguing.
This feels incomplete.
matthewpoage (author)  JamesRPatrick3 years ago
Please let me know which areas you find incomplete. I am happy to add text and pictures to expand on or clarify any part of this project. Refer to the Gorilla Pod instructable by benthekahn referenced above for additional tips on working with Loc-Line modular hose. If this instructable seems incomplete it may be because the project is actually quite straightforward -- select wood, drill and tap a few holes, attach Loc-Line, mount camera! Again, let me know what I can expand or clarify.
I think a final step displaying assembly instructions ("attach Loc-Line", as you say in this comment) at the end is what is missing. Shouldn't have to jump out to another ible to get that final crucial step. Just my .16 bits.
Also, the final product should be featured in the final step.