Instructables

Gravy Recipe

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My gravy recipe will make a delicious sauce made from the pan drippings that are created when you roast meat. This is an Instructable on making a turkey gravy recipe that's perfect for Thanksgiving, but can also be used whenever you've got some drippings that you'd like to put to good use. Turning drippings into gravy takes only a few minutes, can be done on the stove top, uses only flour and water as ingredients, and is a worthwhile addition to any savory meal.

Pass the gravy Instructable please. 
 
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Step 1: Gather materials

To make gravy you need a few simple things:

  • drippings (1/2 cup not including fat)
  • cornstarch of flour (1 or 2 tablespoons)
  • broth (1 cup of chicken, turkey or beef - whatever flavor you like)
  • ice water
  • mixing bowl
  • whisk
  • saucepan

Having a fat separator like the one pictured below is optional. They are super helpful for making gravy, but you can also just spoon off the excess fat manually.

If you have less drippings then I did, that's fine, my drippings are from a pretty big turkey. Just use whatever you have available. You can always add more broth to increase your gravy volume.

Step 2: Pour drippings into pan and heat

If you are using a fat separator, pour off as much of the meat juices as you can, stopping before you pour out any solids or fat. I had about half a cup.

If you don't have a fat separator, simply use a spoon to skim off the top layer of fat from your juices. It will be easier to skim off the fat if you have the drippings in something tall and narrow (like a drinking glass) and harder to do this if your fat in something wide (like a bowl).

Begin heating up the juices, but try not to burn or boil them. Try starting off with a medium to low heat and adjust as necessary.
oilitright1 year ago
Hmmm, well I wasn't going to comment on this until I started reading the comments so here goes (comments are not in any order just as they come to mind. "Gravy" is never made with cornstarch it is made with flour. And as holly-g stated it's called a roux when you mix fat (any kind) with flour. Slurry is something entirely different. Anything with cornstarch is a "sauce" and if you don't know the difference you might as well stop reading now. Also in my family on both sides turkey gravy is more white then brown and contains the giblets from the paper bag found inside of the crop of the turkey. You get your stock from cooking the giblets and then dice the giblets. Using another pan to make the gravy is unnecessary and dirties another pan and by now you've probably dirtied every pan you own. Just use the roasting pan on top of the stove. Skim as much fat out of the pan as you can. Add your turkey stock (make this ahead so it has time to cool) having removed the giblets, dice them and set aside. OK roasting pan on the stove apply medium heat until the dripping and whatnot are getting hot. Start sprinkling flour (BTW Wondra flour if a great thing for first time gravy makers, it is modified in such away as to limit bad gravy experiences and is easier to use). Sprinkle flour into the heated drippings stirring all the time keep adding flour slowly and stirring until you have a fairly thick paste (about like tooth paste). Then start adding the stock all the time whisking away (if you have a stick blender this is the time to dig it out) the better you keep it stirred the less likely you'll have lumpy gravy and with a stick blender lumps don't stand a chance. As soon as you get the consistency you think you want, turn the heat down to a simmer and let it simmer and reduce down to where it is thicker then you want your gravy. Then add the giblets, taste test and if it needs salt and or pepper add a little. So now you have gravy with giblets that is a little too thick so you add a little whole cream or half and half and if you can't bring yourself to cream then milk will pass, this will add richness and results in a great consistency.

The main trick with making gravy is practice. I've been making gravy for 50+ years I'm 65 now and I didn't get to the perfect every time until I was at least 25. It's like making scratch biscuits or pie crust. Yeah you can measure but there are factors that measuring will not compensate for, like humidity, what kind of flour, where it was grown and when.

come make it at my house it was nasty the other day dang dogs would not even eat it ...

lol

+1 for this comment. Every word is gospel. This is the way my family has done it for at least four generations now. I learned from my father, who learned from his mother/my grandmother, who learned from hers, etc. The only thing about this that I do differently is the way the flour (never cornstarch) goes in--I never add dry to wet, always wet to dry. I put a couple of tablespoons of flour in a small measuring cup and add small amounts of the warm (not yet hot) drippings/stock to it, mixing well between additions to get a very thick paste to start with. You are trying to use barely enough liquid to hydrate the flour uniformly to start. I then work this paste to get the lumps out, stirring while adding more liquid in small additions until I end up with a smooth, soupy (like melted ice cream) flour mixture. Then pour the mixture back into *simmering* pan of goodness while stirring and be assured a lump-free result. If the mixture doesn't smooth out satisfactorily (usually too much liquid too fast), I just toss it and start again, but haven't ruined the gravy trying. Also, don't add the entire mixture back to the simmering drippings/stock pan in one shot, start with about half and see how thick it starts to get--you can always add more if it's not quite getting there, and you should leave a little headroom to simmer for a few minutes to cook the flour taste out, during which time it will reduce and thicken more. Sounds time consuming but I get it done in about 60 seconds from dry flour to final simmering, and I haven't had to apologize for lumps in years. Also, don't salt until you've gotten the consistency you want and are ready to serve--the simmering/reduction at the end will intensify saltiness, so if you salt to soon, you could end up with beautiful looking but way salty gravy.
Sounds like we end up with the same deliciousness just slightly different techniques. Tomorrow I am making three turkeys. One will be roasted in the oven, one is getting deep fried and a third my favorite method in a very unusual smoker which combines smoking, convection and steam. Fortunately I'm only doing the turkeys, friends and family are taking care of everything else. Except of course the gravy!
A little caramel coloring sauce like Gravy Master can give it that deep brown color. I like fresh ground pepper, and a little bit of salt, unless there's salt in everything else on the menu (especially stuffing).

yes it does Gravy Master is gr8

axiesdad5 years ago
Great instructable, nice clear "how to." Unfortunately, I'm one of those people who has to know "why." You emphasize not letting the gravy come to a boil; I've always brought it to a boil, why is that wrong? I also lean toward using a roux rather than a slurry, but that's just personal preference.
Some people prefer light color gravy so I guess that is why not letting it boil. Personally I prefer my gravy dark, so I brown my flour well, especially if it is sausage milk gravy for breakfast.
I always let it boil - thats how you cook the flour!

You dont want it to BURN, but thats different from 'boil'.
MadDogKY1 year ago
A simpler way to make the thickening slurry is to put all the ingredients into a clean jar and shake. This eliminates any possible lumps.
holly-g1 year ago
Yeah piks! Use the turkey fat for roux best ever!!! gobble gobble
haoran3 years ago
"it's almost impossible to end up with lumps" ... if you put it into cold water!

If you make a mistake and put it straight into your gravy, you're going to have lumpy gravy!
cameronm965 years ago
why did the gravy go from bein a golden-brown colour and then in the last slide it was suddenly brown? Thanks.
maybe it just settled?
othimus4 years ago
I must say, though, I fixed this turkey, last year, and it was by far, the BEST TURKEY we ever had. HIGHLY RECOMMENDED!!
othimus4 years ago
Probably, a little juice, or boullion. Ya think???
buddie1st5 years ago
If you are cooking for someone with wheat or grain allergies ,I thicken my gravy with mashed potatos . be careful if you add to much pottato stretch the gravy with a little broth or water
Gravy lightens because of the cornstarch or flour slurry. It darkens back up once it's done cooking.
you should concider this as it is the easiest not lump anti celiac gravy and is made with fresh or left over mashed potatoes and broth so can be made anytime with tetra pack brothes
heheheha6 years ago
HI there. Gravy looks Great! Thought I'd offer some technical corrections, the kind that are ALWAYS present in comments... :) Slurry is a combination of a starch and a cold liquid. However, if you use flour (which is a starch), it is TECHNICALLY a white wash. Slurry is fine, but if you were writing for your papers to become a chef, it's white wash. A slurry made with cornstarch will be superior in several ways to a whitewash. First, as you mentioned, is both the thickening power as well as the taste. However, cornstarch has the nice benefit of creating a bit of a shine, which is great for presentation. Arrow root is another common starch option; great shine, but a little less thickening power then cornstarch, and also less opaque (more "clear"). Just something to keep in mind. One last tip...if you are going to be waiting to serve the gravy, take a small slice of butter and place it on the top of the gravy. It melts and stops a skin from forming, plus provides a nice flavour. Again, these are just "technical," corrections, the intstrucatbles itself is great. Clear, concise, and pretty pictures. :)
 You write as if you're a master chef but then you suggest corn starch.  Even a mediocre cook knows that corn starch creates a more gel-like texture!  Flour produces that gravy like texture that gravy is known for.  And mixing flour with water is just fine called a slurry.
Preferences. :) 

And I wish I was a master chef, but...not so mch.
that butter trick sounds useful and delicious! Is that a chef trick?
piks6 years ago
You're wasting all the flavour from the turkey fat and thinning the gravy with water by using what you call a slurry! Why not make a roux from the turkey fat and ordinary flour and use that to thicken the gravy, saving all that flavour and needing less stock (what you call broth). Sorry about the difference in wording, but we are still 2 nations seperated by a common language!
frollard piks5 years ago
**using fat in the gravy is definitely a good method; but it does increase the ...<drumroll>...fat content considerably. 

Fat has a lot of great flavour, but it also is something everybody needs to cut back on.
djr67895 years ago
this is going on top of my to do list it looks so lush!
ElChick6 years ago
NOM NOM NOM!!!!! (8O)>
piks! that's what I always do to make gravy, using the fat dripping from the meat tlk make a roux and incorporating the hydrophilic drippings and stock. Then I serve it to my family, butr can't eat it myself, being veggie :D
haha that sucks, being a vegitarian and having to cook meat for your family.
kg16 years ago
I made chicken gravy last week and homemade really does conquer over canned/jarred store bought gravy crap. I used flour as my thickener and all together I'd say it took about 22 mins or so from start to finish to make. Good times!
piks6 years ago
Sorry, when I said thinning I should have said diluting the flavour.
heheheha6 years ago
Butter thing is commercial kitchen trick; and easily replicated at home! As to the roux idea; you don't thin the gravy with the white wash. The flour thickens, the water is simply so that you can incorporate the flour without making lumps. Once these things are added, you cook the gravy more thereby reducing it; the more you reduce the liquid content, the more you concentrate the flavour. And the first thing to turn into steam and evaporate will be the water. The only real advantage to the roux is that you DO get added flavour, IF you make a brown roux. Then you get a slightly nutty flavour added. However, with most people becoming more and more health concious, a slurry or whitewash is the healthier alternative. However, a good chef can make a pretty lean roux and incorporate it. Leaner roux' use less fat, but are harder to incorporate without lumping. So to sum up; using something other than a roux will not disolve flavour, it simply is a means to thicken.
thebostik6 years ago
Definitely do a taste test, and you'll probably want to add salt.
peguiono6 years ago
Gravy is the best stuff ever invented :D whether its biscuits and gravy or mashed potatoes and gravy it's a fact :P
Sandisk1duo6 years ago
looks like chocolate sauce