Instructables

Greek Yogurt

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I didn’t think that Greek Yogurt would be that much different than the yogurt I usually bought, until I tried it.  The fact that it has twice the protein doesn’t hurt either.  But I have a really hard time paying over a dollar ($1.25) for 6 oz.   So I decided to try and make some Greek yogurt of my own.  I finally found some plain Greek yogurt that listed 5 different active bacteria, just what I needed for my start.  It works a little different than Kefir, but not so much that you can’t make 2 quarts of yogurt for about the cost of three 6 oz. cups.  Yes!  Also, you add your own sweetening and or fruits, plus you can keep the last 6 ounces for your start in the next batch.
 
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Step 1:

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Supplies:
6 oz. of plain, active culture Greek yogurt
3 quarts skim milk
Crockpot/slow cooker
Quart jar
Spoon
Cup
Thermometer
Oven or Wonder Box (not shown, directions found here, http://thermalcooker.wordpress.com/category/thermal-cookers/wonderbox/)

Step 2:

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Pour 3 quarts of skim milk into the slow cooker.  Put in on “warm” and let the milk slowly get up to 140°.

Step 3:

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I checked it every 1 hour or so.  It took my slow cooker 5 hours to get up to the required temp.

Step 4:

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Once the milk has reached the required temperature, mix the 6 oz. of yogurt with a cup of the warm milk.  Mix them well.  Pour the yogurt mixture with the rest of the warm milk, mix well and put the lid back on.
darman1211 months ago
I found an awesome brand of greek yogurt called Zoi. I buy a 32 oz container of it for about $2. I actually like it better than the big brands like Yopa and Oikos.
darman12 darman1211 months ago
Sorry if this kills the DIY spirit.
This is great.. I love trying to do things on my own! But if your concerns are strictly monetary, why not just by a large container of plain, and spoon it out into small cups to take with you to work or to snack on? Then you could add whatever you wanted to make different kinds - fruits and such, even honey!

Kind of like how people waste so much money on snack size chips when they could just put some from a regular bag in a zip-lock... I just don't get it!
I have a similar monetary concern. Let me explain to you economy of scale: I go through about a gallon of yogurt a week since I also use it to replace cream and sour cream and mayonaise and I make frozen yogurt and bread toppings and I eat it for breakfast with granola, and El Boyfriend eats just as much as me... trust me when I say there is no tub sold at a normal supermarket that is big enough to serve all my yogurt needs.
I love greek yogurt with granola! Amazing.
bucklipe1 year ago
While your pictures show that you got a thick and apparently yummy mixture, usually if you put live cultures (even when tempered in the cup) into 140 degrees milk it usually dies. Most yogurt/kefir recepes have you add the culture to the milk after it cools to around 105 to 115 degrees. Then you keep it warm to encourage the wee beasties to do their thing. How does the bacilli stay alive in your setup???
craftknowitall (author)  bucklipe1 year ago
Thanks I will keep that in mind.
Mhbaben2 years ago
This really does look great. I thought Greek yogurt was made out of richer milk than American and that is what gave it a thicker consistency. Is your finished yogurt as thick as your purchased? Also, do you think putting the slow cooker insert could be put in a cooler wrapped in cloth instead of a "wonderbox"?
Great info, thanks
craftknowitall (author)  Mhbaben2 years ago
Since greek yogurt is fat free and they can't take the fat away after they make it, it makes sense that they use skim milk, and it is just as thick. The insert could be in a cooler wrapped in cloth, because that is basically what a wonder box is. Or in a warm (but turned off) oven for over night. Thanks for looking.
Actually, traditional Greek yogurt has 9-10% milk fat (compared to 3.5% or so in regular yogurt). Non-fat Greek yogurt is purely a concession to our current cultural freakout over fat. The brand you picture, Greek Gods, has a full-fat Greek yogurt as well as the non-fat variety. Full-fat Greek yogurt has an INCREDIBLY smooth body and creamy mouth-feel, scoops almost like ice cream, and will blow skim-milk yogurts away. Greek yogurt can be made with whole milk or even (as I do it) with raw whole milk. However, in order to be Greek yogurt, you must strain the whey out - not just dip it off the top. Its thickness when compared to regular yogurt is because so much of the liquid gets strained out. Try straining your yogurt through a coffee filter or finely woven cloth.

Also, for more alternatives to the "Wonder Box" idea, Google haybox or hayboxing. I learned about hayboxing from my grandmother who grew up a ranch foreman's daughter during and after the Dust Bowl; they used to use hayboxes to cook dinner for the ranch hands.
craftknowitall (author)  maka1 year ago
Thanks for the info.!
Absolutely! :)
Thanks for not calling me a snotty know-it-all. ;) It happens on this site often. I just like sharing information with folks.
craftknowitall (author)  maka1 year ago
I would never say that, because if I know something, I share it too. It's called teaching. Have a great day!
Ez-Kabob2 years ago
Looks fun and yummy!