Instructables
Picture of Grill for your barbeque party
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How to make a somewhat moveable and not very difficult grill with big possibilities for own taste.
 
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Step 1: Build the foundation

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The first step is to build a foundation which will decide the size of your grill and most importantly your concrete top. This foundation is made of wood, treated to be able to be used outside as it is.

These wooden boards and beams are cut to appropriate lengths and assembled. The target is to get four stable legs and a box where an isolator can be placed and the fire be made. I'm using standard concrete blocks for this. Be careful when making the size of this as it will be more difficult to cut the concrete blocks than the wooden boards (as I noticed).

I've used screws to assemble and hadn't planned on the angled supports but realised they would be needed as it was a bit unstable before they were added. At the top of the four legs I screwed four bolts into the wood, leaving them sticking up a bit. These are meant to be moulded into the concrete top.

Step 2: Making the mould for the concrete top

The concrete top is made from being cast in a mould. I purchased a wooden board made to make these moulds, which means it had a slick surface. After deciding what kind of grill I wanted and what size would fit the foundation I started making the mould.

I went for a square grid and a round hole to place a frying pan. The board was cut into a base sheet and several slivers. These were then placed as the outer rim by being screwed onto the big sheet. For the square a square was screwed together and to give the grid something to be placed onto two slivers were placed lying down, to give it a groove. This was also screwed onto the sheet. For the round hole an old paint can was used which was placed where the hole was supposed to be.

To prevent the concrete to seep between the boards silicone was added along each crack.
Boost1 year ago
What kind of pan is that?
brunotheman (author)  Boost11 months ago
bought it at a swedish shop, sort of an outdoor frying pan made to be put over a fire..
http://www.biltema.se/sv/Fritid/Friluftsliv-och-camping/Kok-och-vatten/Stekhall-gjutjarn-49504/
tstupple1 year ago
so how it work in practice? did the corner legs get scorched when using it?
brunotheman (author)  tstupple11 months ago
I haven't had the time to test this since i built it at my parents summercabin i haven't been back there and now it's turning into winter, i'll post as soon as i've tested it :) but probably not before june/july 2014 unfortunately
yummyribs11 months ago
how it works in practice? did the corner legs get scorched when using it?
brunotheman (author) 1 year ago
That could be a solution!
domgmr1 year ago
You might want to consider using fire brick mortar or fire cement in the mix.I have done this very thing a few times making make shift kilns and I take old broken oven fire bricks and crush them down,add pumice, cut fiber ie glass to my cement mix.I use very very little water, it is almost dry.Once I get it into my mold, I then use a vibrator on it to remove any air pockets. They work fine
brunotheman (author) 1 year ago
Sounds bad, I have not heard this before, I have however seen other ovens and bbq's using fire made of concrete.. That doesn't make it good though. If it explodes as i test it i will let it be known here! :-)
Looks nice, but the one thing that concerns me, is I've always been taught never to use concrete in around or near fire, the reason being that concrete is filled with little tiny water pockets, when they heat up they expand and flash to steam, with nowhere to expand they build up pressure and then the concrete has the potential to explode.
brunotheman (author) 1 year ago
That's what the concrete blocks are for, to prevent the scorching..
tdewberry1 year ago
Doesn't the wood frame scorch?
bwente1 year ago
>> As it starts to harden, water it a few times each day.

I glad you said "harden" rather than "dry". My art professor always told us that concrete never drys. The person and class that would ask "How long will it take to dry?", would a get lengthy lecture on concrete.
Really cool idea.
brunotheman (author) 1 year ago
I haven't had the time to cut the concrete blocks and because of that i haven't tried it yet:-) if I did before the blocks cover all the wood it sure will be scorched, I'll have to tell you more when I had the time to fix that! The frying pan is a camping equipment with legs which I removed and used like this.
nbma1 year ago
I have the same mention, it is wood. But... it's very good instructions )