Introduction: "Grove"r

This is a remarkable object that will bring interaction and possibility to anyone who encounters it. A single arduino allows this robot to respond to voice commands and to have almost all the senses of its human counterpart.

Step 1: Multiple Inputs and Outputs Without Learning Code!

I bought the "Grove Starter Kit plus" from Seeedstudio about a year ago and saw how many things fit on it. Initially I was excited to use all the sensors and outputs at once. Quickly, I discovered, that multiple sensors and outputs makes for challenging coding. I read a lot of complex tutorials, had some problematic attempts and became overwhelmed.

With the introduction of OS X Yosemite, I discovered that voice commands (created in automator) could control Arduino IDE. I dusted off my kit and set about building and problem solving. The project I created: “Grove”r the voice activated sense bot is the first effort after I worked out how to do it. To my surprise, it uses lots of inputs and outputs and then does so much more. All the code I used is copied and pasted from other people's work. I am including links to their work as I go.

Watch the video to see him in action. Everything is working. The LED's are hard to see. I will upload a better video soon.

Step 2: Electronics You Will Need:

Electronics:

Arduino or clone

Grove base shield

Grove servo

Grove LED’s (3)

Grove Magnetic switch (with a magnet)

Grove sound sensor

Grove piezo buzzer

Grove light sensor

(it seems like a long list but all the Grove parts came in the Grove starter kit plus)

Step 3: Computer Needs:

A Mac that can run using OS X Yosemite

USB A-B

a microphone

Arduino IDE 2

Automator (comes with Yosemite)

Step 4: Skull Build:

Halloween foam skull

Scissors

K'nex

Painter’s tape

A drill

Fishing line

elastic bands

Hot Glue gun and sticks

Doll's eyes

Step 5: Assemble the Electronics

Grove base shield goes onto the Arduino.

The Servo is attached to pin D7

The light sensor is attached to A3

The sound sensor is attached to A0

The LED’s are attached to pins: D2, D4, and D5

The magnetic reed switch is attached to D8

The piezo buzzer is attached to D3

Grove works out the voltage and ground for you. The shield is plug and play, which makes it simple.

Step 6: Code

Save these 3 codes for Listen, See, and Sing as arduino (.ino) files separately:

I have included the IDE files but they have different names.

Listen:

int soundSensorPin=A0;
int soundReading=0; int soundThreshold=500; int intensity[3]={0,0,0}; int LEDPins[3] = {2,4,5}; int numberOfPins=3; int currentPin=0; int fadeCounter=0; int fadeDelay=50; boolean switcher = true;

void setup(){ pinMode(soundSensorPin, INPUT); for(int i=0; i

void loop(){ soundReading=analogRead(soundSensorPin); if(soundReading>soundThreshold){ if(switcher){ aboveThreshold(currentPin); switcher=true; } } else { if(switcher){ belowThreshold(); switcher=true; } } }

void aboveThreshold(int cPin){ switcher=false; if(intensity[cPin]<10){ intensity[cPin]=255; delay(50); currentPin=currentPin+1; }

if(currentPin==numberOfPins){ currentPin=0; } }

void belowThreshold(){ switcher=false; fadeCounter++; if(fadeCounter==fadeDelay){ fadeCounter=0; for(int i=0; i

source: https://gist.github.com/michelleboisson/3830481

Followed by See:

/*
* Control Servo Through Light Sensor (e.g. Photoresistor). * * Copyright (C) 2010 Efstathios Chatzikyriakidis (contact@efxa.org) * * This program is free software: you can redistribute it and/or modify * it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by * the Free Software Foundation, either version 3 of the License, or * (at your option) any later version. * * This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful, * but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of * MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. See the * GNU General Public License for more details. * * You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License * along with this program. If not, see . */ // include library for servo. #include Servo myServo; // create servo object to control a servo. const int servoPin = 7; // the pin number (PWM) for the servo. const int sensorPin = 3; // the pin number for the input sensor. // current and previous values for servo device. int valServo = 0; int oldValue = 0; // the following values may change according to the light sensor. // perform a calibration with pure dark, and pure light at first. const int lightMin = 170; // set the appropriate value of the light sensor. const int lightMax = 512; // set the appropriate value of the light sensor. const int LIGHT_SENSE = 5; // difference level sensitivity value. const long delayTime = 15; // servo movement delay time in millis. // startup point entry (runs once). void setup () { // set sensor as input. pinMode(sensorPin, INPUT); // attach the servo on a pin. myServo.attach(servoPin); } // loop the main sketch. void loop () { // get the value from the light sensor. int valServo = analogRead(sensorPin); // map the value to the min, max of the servo. valServo = map (valServo, lightMin, lightMax, 0, 179); // ensure that the value is between min, max of the servo. valServo = constrain(valServo, 0, 179); // move servo only if light changes enough. if (abs(valServo - oldValue) > LIGHT_SENSE) { // move the servo. myServo.write(valServo); // keep the last value. oldValue = valServo; } // wait some time the servo to move. delay(delayTime); }

source: https://www.instructables.com/id/Control-Servo-with-Light/

Followed by Sing:



/*
Arduino Mario Bros Tunes With Piezo Buzzer and PWM Connect the positive side of the Buzzer to pin 3, then the negative side to a 1k ohm resistor. Connect the other side of the 1 k ohm resistor to ground(GND) pin on the Arduino. by: Dipto Pratyaksa last updated: 31/3/13 */ /************************************************* * Public Constants *************************************************/ #define NOTE_B0 31 #define NOTE_C1 33 #define NOTE_CS1 35 #define NOTE_D1 37 #define NOTE_DS1 39 #define NOTE_E1 41 #define NOTE_F1 44 #define NOTE_FS1 46 #define NOTE_G1 49 #define NOTE_GS1 52 #define NOTE_A1 55 #define NOTE_AS1 58 #define NOTE_B1 62 #define NOTE_C2 65 #define NOTE_CS2 69 #define NOTE_D2 73 #define NOTE_DS2 78 #define NOTE_E2 82 #define NOTE_F2 87 #define NOTE_FS2 93 #define NOTE_G2 98 #define NOTE_GS2 104 #define NOTE_A2 110 #define NOTE_AS2 117 #define NOTE_B2 123 #define NOTE_C3 131 #define NOTE_CS3 139 #define NOTE_D3 147 #define NOTE_DS3 156 #define NOTE_E3 165 #define NOTE_F3 175 #define NOTE_FS3 185 #define NOTE_G3 196 #define NOTE_GS3 208 #define NOTE_A3 220 #define NOTE_AS3 233 #define NOTE_B3 247 #define NOTE_C4 262 #define NOTE_CS4 277 #define NOTE_D4 294 #define NOTE_DS4 311 #define NOTE_E4 330 #define NOTE_F4 349 #define NOTE_FS4 370 #define NOTE_G4 392 #define NOTE_GS4 415 #define NOTE_A4 440 #define NOTE_AS4 466 #define NOTE_B4 494 #define NOTE_C5 523 #define NOTE_CS5 554 #define NOTE_D5 587 #define NOTE_DS5 622 #define NOTE_E5 659 #define NOTE_F5 698 #define NOTE_FS5 740 #define NOTE_G5 784 #define NOTE_GS5 831 #define NOTE_A5 880 #define NOTE_AS5 932 #define NOTE_B5 988 #define NOTE_C6 1047 #define NOTE_CS6 1109 #define NOTE_D6 1175 #define NOTE_DS6 1245 #define NOTE_E6 1319 #define NOTE_F6 1397 #define NOTE_FS6 1480 #define NOTE_G6 1568 #define NOTE_GS6 1661 #define NOTE_A6 1760 #define NOTE_AS6 1865 #define NOTE_B6 1976 #define NOTE_C7 2093 #define NOTE_CS7 2217 #define NOTE_D7 2349 #define NOTE_DS7 2489 #define NOTE_E7 2637 #define NOTE_F7 2794 #define NOTE_FS7 2960 #define NOTE_G7 3136 #define NOTE_GS7 3322 #define NOTE_A7 3520 #define NOTE_AS7 3729 #define NOTE_B7 3951 #define NOTE_C8 4186 #define NOTE_CS8 4435 #define NOTE_D8 4699 #define NOTE_DS8 4978 #define melodyPin 3 //Mario main theme melody int melody[] = { NOTE_E7, NOTE_E7, 0, NOTE_E7, 0, NOTE_C7, NOTE_E7, 0, NOTE_G7, 0, 0, 0, NOTE_G6, 0, 0, 0, NOTE_C7, 0, 0, NOTE_G6, 0, 0, NOTE_E6, 0, 0, NOTE_A6, 0, NOTE_B6, 0, NOTE_AS6, NOTE_A6, 0, NOTE_G6, NOTE_E7, NOTE_G7, NOTE_A7, 0, NOTE_F7, NOTE_G7, 0, NOTE_E7, 0, NOTE_C7, NOTE_D7, NOTE_B6, 0, 0, NOTE_C7, 0, 0, NOTE_G6, 0, 0, NOTE_E6, 0, 0, NOTE_A6, 0, NOTE_B6, 0, NOTE_AS6, NOTE_A6, 0, NOTE_G6, NOTE_E7, NOTE_G7, NOTE_A7, 0, NOTE_F7, NOTE_G7, 0, NOTE_E7, 0, NOTE_C7, NOTE_D7, NOTE_B6, 0, 0 }; //Mario main them tempo int tempo[] = { 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 9, 9, 9, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 9, 9, 9, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, }; //Underworld melody int underworld_melody[] = { NOTE_C4, NOTE_C5, NOTE_A3, NOTE_A4, NOTE_AS3, NOTE_AS4, 0, 0, NOTE_C4, NOTE_C5, NOTE_A3, NOTE_A4, NOTE_AS3, NOTE_AS4, 0, 0, NOTE_F3, NOTE_F4, NOTE_D3, NOTE_D4, NOTE_DS3, NOTE_DS4, 0, 0, NOTE_F3, NOTE_F4, NOTE_D3, NOTE_D4, NOTE_DS3, NOTE_DS4, 0, 0, NOTE_DS4, NOTE_CS4, NOTE_D4, NOTE_CS4, NOTE_DS4, NOTE_DS4, NOTE_GS3, NOTE_G3, NOTE_CS4, NOTE_C4, NOTE_FS4, NOTE_F4, NOTE_E3, NOTE_AS4, NOTE_A4, NOTE_GS4, NOTE_DS4, NOTE_B3, NOTE_AS3, NOTE_A3, NOTE_GS3, 0, 0, 0 }; //Underwolrd tempo int underworld_tempo[] = { 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 6, 3, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 6, 3, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 6, 3, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 6, 6, 18, 18, 18, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 18, 18, 18, 18, 18, 18, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 3, 3, 3 }; void setup(void) { pinMode(3, OUTPUT);//buzzer pinMode(13, OUTPUT);//led indicator when singing a note } void loop() { //sing the tunes sing(1); sing(1); sing(2); } int song = 0; void sing(int s) { // iterate over the notes of the melody: song = s; if (song == 2) { Serial.println(" 'Underworld Theme'"); int size = sizeof(underworld_melody) / sizeof(int); for (int thisNote = 0; thisNote < size; thisNote++) { // to calculate the note duration, take one second // divided by the note type. //e.g. quarter note = 1000 / 4, eighth note = 1000/8, etc. int noteDuration = 1000 / underworld_tempo[thisNote]; buzz(melodyPin, underworld_melody[thisNote], noteDuration); // to distinguish the notes, set a minimum time between them. // the note's duration + 30% seems to work well: int pauseBetweenNotes = noteDuration * 1.30; delay(pauseBetweenNotes); // stop the tone playing: buzz(melodyPin, 0, noteDuration); } } else { Serial.println(" 'Mario Theme'"); int size = sizeof(melody) / sizeof(int); for (int thisNote = 0; thisNote < size; thisNote++) { // to calculate the note duration, take one second // divided by the note type. //e.g. quarter note = 1000 / 4, eighth note = 1000/8, etc. int noteDuration = 1000 / tempo[thisNote]; buzz(melodyPin, melody[thisNote], noteDuration); // to distinguish the notes, set a minimum time between them. // the note's duration + 30% seems to work well: int pauseBetweenNotes = noteDuration * 1.30; delay(pauseBetweenNotes); // stop the tone playing: buzz(melodyPin, 0, noteDuration); } } } void buzz(int targetPin, long frequency, long length) { digitalWrite(13, HIGH); long delayValue = 1000000 / frequency / 2; // calculate the delay value between transitions //// 1 second's worth of microseconds, divided by the frequency, then split in half since //// there are two phases to each cycle long numCycles = frequency * length / 1000; // calculate the number of cycles for proper timing //// multiply frequency, which is really cycles per second, by the number of seconds to //// get the total number of cycles to produce for (long i = 0; i < numCycles; i++) { // for the calculated length of time... digitalWrite(targetPin, HIGH); // write the buzzer pin high to push out the diaphram delayMicroseconds(delayValue); // wait for the calculated delay value digitalWrite(targetPin, LOW); // write the buzzer pin low to pull back the diaphram delayMicroseconds(delayValue); // wait again or the calculated delay value } digitalWrite(13, LOW); }

source: http://www.princetronics.com/supermariothemesong/

Step 7: Setting Up Voice Control on Your Mac

The voice control takes some setting up. You need to go into system preferences and install the advanced voice control options. You also need to go into accessibility and allow voice control to control applications. To turn on voice control, I press the right command key twice. That is the default. I had to attach a microphone using the mic jack on my mac so my voice could be heard.

Automator application gives you the choice of a dictation application when you start a new file. Choose this option.

Name the file the command you want to use. I made 3 files: Listen, See, Sing. The command: Upload is made in accessibility by pressing add command.

In each automator file, use the "files and folders" tab and drag the code called “get specified finder items” attach the arduino code file (see, listen, etc) to this code section.

Next, get the code called “open finder items” Select Arduino 2 as your default application. I had to look for the application. It was not in the main application list so I chose other and typed “Ard” and it showed up.

Repeat the automator code process for the Each of the listen see, and sing files. I used the dictation settings to record the keypress “command u”.



Here is another instructable that explains Automator basics: https://www.instructables.com/id/How-to-make-apps-automator

Step 8: The Skull Build

The skull build was pretty basic. I used some scissors to remove excess foam and I drilled some holes to install a K-nex mouth that moves.

The blink mechanism took some effort to assemble. I attached some pingpong balls with drilled and cut holes to some K-nex that was attached to the servo. I tied fishing line to the end of the servo and hot glued it to the bottom of the pingpong balls. I also attached elastics to the eyes and the K-nex structure so that they return to the original position when the servo is not firing. There are some great tutorials on how to make robotic eyes blink. Here is a link to one:

https://www.instructables.com/id/new-animatronic-Eyes-Rock-On/

I simply used painters tape to attach the sensors and their outputs to appropriate places on the robot. It also helps to have the tape because it serves as skin and makes the skull less halloween specific.

Step 9: Try Out Your "Grove"r

I connected the arduino to my computer, turned on my camera, and got that behaviour from the robot on the first take.

In a few trials, voice commands opened a new IDE file as well as the requested ones and sometimes the computer typed the word upload via dictation into the document, rather than run the command "upload". Another problem I had is that the sing has so much noise that the microphone stops hearing new commands. Most of the time, though it behaves as expected.

Step 10: Next Steps

I had big dreams for this project and this is just a proof of concept. I am working on replacing the 3 LED's with LED RGB strip lighting. I want the code to choose a colour based on the volume in the room (green for good, yellow for loud, and red for too loud). I want to add a cloud hair effect so that the strip light changes the colour of his hair.

You probably noticed that the sing sketch does not include a push button variable. I was able to get some sketches to work with a button but the song sketch I liked did not mesh with button control. I made the mouth movable so that the hinge would line up with the button as seen in the picture above. This way, the sketch would only sing when the mouth was physically open.

The eyes blink but they move in opposite directions and tend to shake, rather than open and close. I have a previous project where the eyes worked but I had to start another eye mechanism from scratch. I hid the servo parts inside the skull and putting them backwards made it harder to align the eye motion. That needs some work.

As a proof of concept, I am happy with "Grove"r. Beyond the robot face sensor idea, the best part of this project is that it frees the arduino to do more with less. By combining the use of voice commanded sketch uploading, and multiple inputs and outputs, I am sure the micro controller enthusiasts out there can come up with amazing and exciting projects of their own.

If you think this is a cool idea or something is unclear, let me know in the comments.

You should also check out my website: http://codyduino.yolasite.com

Comments

author
tamara34 (author)2014-11-11

Cool!

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Bio: I am a teacher in Canada. I have a little family and a small army of robots. I like robotics on a budget and artful ... More »
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