Instructables
Giant beans are really easy to grow and have the potental to reach a yard long, hence their nickname "yard-long beans."

These giant beans originated in China and can often be found for sale in the produce department of Asian Supermarkets. I got started with growing these giant beans when I bought up a whole bunch of seed packets filled with Asparagus beans in the gift shop of a Ripley's Believe it or Not museum on clearance for 5 cents each. I had much success growing these large beans, and eventually expanded to other variates of giant beans, and have been growing them ever since.

In this Instructable, I will show you the basics of how I grow my beans.

Step 1: Obtain the seeds...

Picture of Obtain the seeds...
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In order to grow giant beans, you need to pick out a variety that grows to an exceptionally large size. The two types of giant beans that I have had the most success with are Yard Long Asparagus Beans and Red Noodle Beans.

I personally have never purchased from them, but it seems Kitazawa Seed has a good selection of giant beans.

The seeds I used were from the clearance of a Ripley's Believe it or Not museum gift shop (5 cents per packet) and also from Territorial Seed Company. Chances are you won't find these beans in the seed department of your local Home Depot, so the internet is probably your best bet for buying seeds.

 
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Decepticon5 years ago
Do you think using tomato cages would help green/string beans grow the way yours grow? I have only a few plants and they are already producing fruit, but they aren't very high. Any tips?
woofboy111 (author)  Decepticon5 years ago
It depends what type of beans you have. There are two major types, bush beans and pole beans. Bush beans will not climb and will stay about a foot tall while pole beans will climb up just about anything. Since your plants are already producing, it sounds like you have a type of bush bean.
oops, forgot to mntion that I am already using the tomato cages and attempting to 'help' them along by placing the vines/stalks on to upper parts of the cage.