loading

Welcome to my second instructable.

In this instructable I'm going to show you how I built my subwoofer. I want you to use this instructable to come up with your own ideas, for brainsurfing or to use this as a guide. Mostly I would like you to be innovative and creative when you're building your own!

I hope you'll enjoy my instructable!

Step 1: Get the Needed Parts and Materials

List of needed parts and materials with link/description of where I bough them:

  • Speaker unit (MGR FAT-104, 10" unit in my project), (bought from ljudia.se)
  • Reflex port (3" port), (from ljudia.se)
  • Amplifier (or crossover for a passive subwoofer), I bought a used Zachry dsw-150 for about 65 USD.
  • Vinyl Wallpaper, (bought from bauhaus: http://www.bauhaus.se/designfolie-sjalvhaftande-faner-svart-tra-45x200cm.html)
  • Rubber feet
  • 19 mm MDF-board (bauhaus)
  • Glass wool or other damping material (bauhaus)
  • Screws
  • Sandpaper, sanding machine
  • Wood glue

Then you'll also need some tools but instead of listing them I think it is better for you to see what I'm doing so that you might find another way of doing it if you don't have the same tools.

To get a speaker unit for my project I searched for speaker units that included plans for good box measurements. Ljudia.se, a swedish online shop have lots of speaker units and some of them had plans, so I bought one of them that had a nice frequency range and also a good box. I don't have a lot of knowledge about speaker properties. But I did my best to read on forums etc. to find a pretty good speaker unit and a pretty good box.

What I looked at most was the frequency response curve, Fb and F3 values because I wanted a pretty deep bass.

Step 2: Cut the MDF-board

The inner volume according to the plans was 60,64 L and the box inner measurements were 550x350x315mm. So I decided to make the MDF pieces in these sizes (not exactly as the plans):

Front: 588x388mm

Sides: 588x334mm

Top and bottom: 350x334mm

Back: 550x350mm

When the pieces where in the right sizes I made holes for the speaker unit and the port on the front board and a hole on the backside for the amplifier.

I used a sticksaw for all of the MDF pieces and sanded the edges straight.

Step 3: Make the Box

All the pieces were glued and screwed together. I bored a 2mm hole before screwing the screws in to avoid cracks.

When the box was assembled I sanded the whole box to remove edges etc. Then I used a hand milling machine to round the upper side edges so that the vinyl wallpaper could go all the way around without making extra edges on it.

To cover up the screws I made some own putty out of mdf powder that was in the sanding machine's powder collector bag that I mixed with wood glue. It worked pretty well but I recommend using some "real" putty instead of this. It became really hard when it dried and was really hard to sand without sanding down the mdf around it.

Step 4: Damping the Box

Now it's time to damp the box with glass wool. This will make the speaker think that the box is bigger than it is as will result in a better sound.

I just squirted some wood glue on the walls of the box before applying the glass wool. Then I also put a few screws with a plastic washer to decrease noise and to secure it better.

I used a damp cloth to clean up all the sides of the box from the sanding.

Finally the inside of the speaker was finished and I could to some sound tests and I was really happy with the result!

Step 5: Finish

Now it's time to apply the vinyl wallpaper. I chose a black wooden look which I thought would look really nice.

I made sure that the surface was clean and the I applied the outer edge of the vinyl and slowly applied the rest of it to make sure that it was straight without bubbles etc. Then I used a sharp knife to cut away the leftovers. I did this to all of the sides and added four rubber feet to avoid scratches to the vinyl and to also reduce noise from vibrations.

Now just put on all the electronics and you're done! Finally!!

Step 6: Result

Done! Finally done with the subwoofer!

I am really happy with the result. It seems to work really good down to about 25 Hz then it starts to sound weird, but 25Hz is really good. The sound depth in movies is much better and it sometimes feels like my apartment is shaking!

The subwoofer makes music much better aswell. I'm using it with Canton 490 and canton 416 and it works like a charm. The total cost was about 230 dollars I do not think that I would have gotten a speaker as good as this one if I would've bought one. Those subwoofers that you buy in a store usually are so slim/small that the frequecy span is very narrow compared to a home build one.

I hope that my instructable has inspired you to build your own subwoofer and hopefully you'll find out many different innovative solutions.

Thank you for reading my instructable! I hope to see you again!

<p>Very cool build. Great work OP. I've built a few speaker boxes for cars (many years ago) and I found that a sealed box always sounded much cleaner than a ported box. I currently have a 12&quot; ported sub hooked to my home theater and I turned it off years ago because I didn't like how over exaggerated the ported box makes it sound.</p>
<p>You can actually make your ported box behave like a closed one by plugging the port(s). Foam is ideal to my knowing, but I've used wool socks in the past :)</p>
<p>Thank you! I think it is easier to make a sealed subwoofer that sounds good, but you should take a look at your subwoofer and see if the port is tuned right. Probably not, so hopefully you're able to fix it and make the subwoofer useful again :)</p>
<p>Then you have either a wrongly tuned port or a speaker with a high Qts</p>
where did you get the woofer?
<p>I bought it at ljudia.se, it is a swedish website so I'm not sure how it is with shipping to other countries.</p>
<p>Damn, that's sweet. I want to make one.</p>
<p>Great instructable!</p><p>It would be awesome if you could share some links on where you got the parts, or similar parts on Amazon (protip: If you plan to make many more instructables, sign up to be an affiliate: https://affiliate-program.amazon.com/).</p>
Thanks for the advice and your comment, really appreciate it! I'll take a look at amazon.com in a week, I'm on vacation now.
<p>Of course. Enjoy your vacation!</p>
I like it thanks for this been meaning to make another better sub like yours ...very well made keep em comming!
Thanks for your comment, I really appreciate it!
very nice instructable!<br>its very professionaly worked.. I'd like to know how much costs all parts?<br>
Thank you! I'll add the cost of each part to the instructable in a week. The total cost was about 230 usd.
<p>Beautiful speaker </p><p>The only thing I would recommend is playing it outside for an hour so all loose glass fibre blows out it wont destroy your speaker but it will itch ;)</p><p>You could use sheep wool instead but if your allergic that will itch too ;) </p>
Thank you! I actually tried to blow out the glassfibre by hitting it with my hands (with vinyl gloves) but your way will totally work aswell!
<p>Beautiful unit! It looks very professional, and I'm envious of you. One thing that I noticed by its glaring omission was the amplifier. You make no mention of installing it, nor its specs or where it can be obtained. Please elaborate. Thanks</p>
Thanks for the comment! I must've forgotten that. I'll add info about it in a week!
<p>Looks professional but using glass fibre seems very strange too me.Its just unhealthy and there are alternatives. I also build speakers as a hobby and my standard item inside the box for damping is hifi foam rubber since ages. greetings</p>
<p>Great Work! Would you recommend building a Sub-woofer this way for a car?</p>
No, you want to work with the dimensions of your car. So do the same calculations and build a box of the necessary volume, but modify the shape to fit your car. So a rectangle might not be best. Keep in mind you want a 12 inch driver at least 6 inches from the walls of your car, and the port a similar distance.
I would against using insulation for walls as its fibreglass, there as special danpening materials which are better suited for a sub, especially for a ported one.
<p>Do not use fiberglass insulation in speaker cabinets. The glass fibers can cut speaker driver voice coils. Fiberglass is really glass. I think the stuff in speakers that looks like fiberglass is really poly fill insulation. Plastic is a lot softer than glass is. Carpet padding works good too. Your cabinet came out really nice looking.</p>
<p>I've been a sound engineer for 29 years, and I've used fiberglass insulation in lots of speaker cabinets. The voice coil is in a gap surrounded by a magnet, and so it would be very hard for any sort of fiber to make it's way in there, even through a vented pole piece. The strands of glass are very small, thin as a human hair, and while they might poke your skin and irritate it, the chances of them cutting a piece of copper wire that is covered with glue and shellac is slim to none. However, you are correct in saying poly fill is another alternative, but it is not as dense as insulation, so you'd have to use a lot more of it. Carpet padding is too dense and should not be used, it wouldn't have any effect at all.</p>
<p>That's a nice good look.Where did you get that black wooden vinyl? I'd love to use it in my own speakers project! Thanks in advance!!</p>
its nice.. bt I think a bandpass enclosure design may much better than this vented one. also I'm little confused about your design pattern as well. to get the desired band of output frequency, u should bother about the speaker specifications along with the enclosure design cubic volume and vent measurement.
<p>It help to have a Swede around here :) I saw you linked to Bauhaus, which we also have here, in Denmark. I'm going to build custom pc speakers for my new pc, and loved the vinyl, and as it turns out, the Danish Bauhaus also has this excact vinyl. BTW, this is the second instructable, that I'm Admiring, from You. Looks great, &quot;Neighbour&quot; :D</p>
<p>I really appreciate it, my &quot;neighbour&quot;! :D Thank you for your comment! Please post a picture here if you'd like to share your speakers when your finished :)</p>
I would never believe this woofer was homemade if I had not seen this Instructable...
<p>Thank you :D</p>
<p>fyi, you dont really hear 25Hz so much as feel it but nice and simple little write up, thanks :)</p>
Yeah, it's more like a shaky feeling, but below 25hz my subwoofer starts making some noise. Thanks for ur comment!
thank ou very much...
<p>Very profesional looking! Thanks for sharing your knowledge. </p>
<p>I appreciate it! Thank you for your comment!</p>
very very nice. can you provide a link to the type of vinyl you used. it looks thicker than an an automotive grade vinyl.
<p>Thank you! I bought it here: <a href="http://www.bauhaus.se/designfolie-sjalvhaftande-faner-svart-tra-45x200cm.html" rel="nofollow">http://www.bauhaus.se/designfolie-sjalvhaftande-fa...</a></p><p>The vinyl is pretty thin, I don't think if there are any specs about the thickness on the website but there's a video that you can check, how to apply it. Maybe you'll see better in the vid and can estimate the thickness :)</p>

About This Instructable

39,425views

502favorites

License:

More by philxter:HIFI Subwoofer for cinema and music Portable 3-way hifi speaker/boomcase 
Add instructable to: