Introduction: Hide Your RasPi Cloud in Plain Sight

While this is written with my Raspberry Pi in mind, this 'Ible can, of course, be accomplished with any device that you have the desire to hide. Whether it be an Intel Edison, an Arduino, or any other single board computer, all it takes is a little imagination and some digging to find just what you want.

Step 1: Step 1: Gather and Prepare the Parts

As you can see, I have a decent amount to hide along with my Pi. There's the Pi, itself; the Pi's power supply; a powered USB hub with power supply; and a pair of external hard drives with connecting cables.

I was helping to clean someone's house a few weeks ago (they were moving up north) and I came across a plain, cheap DVD player. With no knowledge (or care) of its working status, I decided that this would be my hidey hole. I finally got around to gutting the device (that's a different 'Ible altogether), I set aside the various motors, the laser diode, connectors, and anything else that I figured I might need in the future.

Once all of the unneeded parts have been removed from the case, break off the three upright posts on your right (they held up part of the guts and will only get in the way) as cleanly as possible and move to step 2.

Step 2: Step 2: Cram It All in There

Now it's time to get imaginative. Take everything that you'd like to be inside of your case and begin playing Tetris with it all. Once you have a modicum of order about your equipment, begin considering the wiring of all of your pieces. Ideally, one would be able to find cables that are on the shorter end of short so that you don't need to bunch up the cables as you can see that I've done.

My recommendation, depending on the amount of equipment that you are placing within your case, is to use velcro pads between the case and the piece to cease movement of the parts if the case is moved, but to facilitate removal of the parts should the need arise for repair.

Step 3: Step 3: Button It Up

Assuming that you haven't thrown all of your stuff across the room or given up and gone out for drinks, you're done. Close up the case, put it in the obvious hiding spot, and enjoy your cloud/media/web server/streamer/desktop.

Comments

author
David LG (author)2015-11-14

Very nice work ! about the heat, i guess adding a little fan like on the picture would solve heat problems, if there's any ...

The 2-pins fans are very handy : they can be connected directly between the GPIO 0V and 5V so that it doesn't require any programming, just requires extra power from the power supply. (i'm using a 30mm fan and a 2A power supply, no problems)

My question is : Can anyone think of a detailled tutorial about how to turn a Raspi Into a Cloud ?

I'm struggling to find how to do this,any piece of info is welcome ! please help :D

Fan.jpgGPIO_Pi2.png
author
stalker145 (author)David LG2015-11-14

Thanks, David. I've been considering putting a fan on the system but haven't gotten to it yet.
As for the tutorial, can surely put one together that is ownCloud specific. I'll start on it after the weekend.

author
David LG (author)stalker1452015-12-08

Hello, i bumped into this instructable that looks already very detailled !

https://www.instructables.com/id/Ultimate-Pi-Based-Home-Server/

author
stalker145 (author)David LG2015-12-08

That is, undoubtedly a very well detailed 'ible. The only thing I can see in it is the use of the repositories to install ownCloud. While this will lead to a very stable server, it will also leave you a couple (maybe) of releases behind on updates while installing from source will keep you up with the Joneses.

Thank you for pointing out that 'ible and its excellent inclusion of hardware AND software how-to.

author
JessicaMills (author)2015-09-10

Nice one, me like it!

author
LownIgnitus (author)2015-09-08

how does this handle the heat generated by all the parts in a tiny space?

author
stalker145 (author)LownIgnitus2015-09-08

> vcgencmd measure_temp temp=49.2'C

So far, so good. Regretfully, my WD hard disks don't seem to like SMART queries, so there's no temperature reading from either of them, but the Pi itself is running well within specs.

Using the touch method, the outside is nice and cool, even around the vents (on the bottom and back of the case).I've also not noted any slowdown that is normally associated with heat buildup.

> smartctl -a /dev/sda1
smartctl 5.41 2011-06-09 r3365 [armv7l-linux-4.1.6-v7+] (local build)
Copyright (C) 2002-11 by Bruce Allen, http://smartmontools.sourceforge.net
Vendor: WD
Product: My Passport 0820
Revision: 1007
User Capacity: 2,000,365,289,472 bytes [2.00 TB]
Logical block size: 512 bytes
Serial number: WX21A44K6303
Device type: disk
Local Time is: Tue Sep 8 21:40:34 2015 BST
Device does not support SMART
Error Counter logging not supported
No self-tests have been logged

> smartctl -a /dev/sdb1
smartctl 5.41 2011-06-09 r3365 [armv7l-linux-4.1.6-v7+] (local build)
Copyright (C) 2002-11 by Bruce Allen, http://smartmontools.sourceforge.net
Vendor: WD
Product: My Passport 0820
Revision: 1007
User Capacity: 1,000,170,586,112 bytes [1.00 TB]
Logical block size: 512 bytes
Serial number: WX31E73DUDH7
Device type: disk
Local Time is: Tue Sep 8 21:41:12 2015 BST
Device does not support SMART
Error Counter logging not supported
No self-tests have been logged

> hddtemp /dev/sda1
/dev/sda1: WD My Passport 0820: S.M.A.R.T. not available

> hddtemp /dev/sdb1
/dev/sdb1: WD My Passport 0820: S.M.A.R.T. not available

author
chrislebeck (author)2015-09-05

what are you using for the software on the pi?

author
stalker145 (author)chrislebeck2015-09-06

Currently, I'm using Minibian on all of my Pis.

https://minibianpi.wordpress.com/

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