Instructables
Picture of Historic Ship

Hi there, i'll try to show you how to make a model of a historic ship. Before i start, you should know that i am not expert at this, on the contrary this was my first try at this and i was surprise that it actually turn out like this. The whole process is not complicated but will require a lot of patience.

 
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Step 1: Getting the required materials

Picture of Getting the required materials
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So to begin you will have to get the materials required.

1) plywood, or balsa Wood - for the skeleton. in my case i'm using balsa wood because i don't have disc-saw or band-saw and balsa wood is very soft and can be cut with a normal cutter.

2)thin wood stripes, or bamboo stripes or rattan - here the most important thing is that it is very flexible. I'm using thin stripes of rattan because it was lying in my garage, that's also how i got the idea of making this ship.

3) wood glue, try avoiding instant glue , power glue or hot glue. You could use those but will have to very careful not to make a mess, like i did in the beginning when i tried those. Just stick with wood glue.

4) you will also need a plan. i am posting a plan but it was to much for me, so it did change a lot of things. Just do as you please. I haven't stick to it at all, i just use it as a reference in the beginning. In the original plans there were like 13 ribs( i not sure it called ribs , but you will understand what i am talking about when you the plan and pictures). So for my model i use only 4 ribs and got away with it pretty good like you will see in the pictures. ( 2, 5 , 9 and 13) were the ones i used. I also did a lot of improvisation. I also made a few modification to the general form of the plan(the red lines).

The main body is called the hull, the front the bow, the back the stern, and the middle the masts
rpotts22 months ago

nicely done! and very creative adaptations too. fir the soft wood did you MEAN balsam or balsa? was it the same wood they use for model airplanes? that's balsa. its rather important due to the work involved.

Z3r01f1n1ty (author)  rpotts22 months ago

i did also correct it , thanks again

Z3r01f1n1ty (author)  rpotts22 months ago

hi, thank you for pointing me to my mistake. you are right its balsa, when i bought it at the store the storekeeper was call it it balsam, that s why i wrote balsam, i thought

he knew what he was talking about as this is his job. But you could use normal plywood as long as its has a min thickness of half centimeter.

Plywood does bring a few advantages, like using small nail to hold the wood stripes in place while gluing instead of clamps like i did, this is actually how they do it in the factories and you wont have to wait for it to dry.

When i was 10 i visited one of these factories that s how i got the idea years later, they also use normal wood stripes ,and would sand the extra when they are done so it would be smooth.

Well done I think I might give it a try myself
Z3r01f1n1ty (author)  anguspodgorney2 months ago

if you do , use as few ribs as possible and very flexible and thin wood stripes makes things a lot easier. this was my first try and made few mistakes along the way. now I want to make an even bigger one but ran out of raw materials.

Jack Moran2 months ago

This is awesome!

Roastie2 months ago
In step one you may want to change dick saw to disc saw :-) I don't have a dick saw either and am frankly quite glad that I do not!
Jetpack53 months ago

Very impressive! It would be a great technique for a viking boat since it gives that klinker-built look to it. I've wanted to try building a scratch-built ship and I'll ahve to store this away for that day.

Z3r01f1n1ty (author)  Jetpack53 months ago

Thanks, i'm glad this will be helpful to at least 1 person.

BLR_RAVI3 months ago
wonderful ...i liked it..
Z3r01f1n1ty (author)  BLR_RAVI3 months ago

thanks ;)