Introduction: Hockey Sixer

I wanted to create a unique way to carry my brews. A friend of mine has been collecting broken hockey sticks for about 2 decades. So I cleaned out his garage and turned his old broken sticks into re-usable six pack carriers - Hockey Sixers. Here's how to make your own. I am also giving one away on our blog - pondhockeybrew.com.

Step 1: Materials

  1. You will need 2 and 1/2 to 4 wooden hockey sticks, depending on how much good lumber you have left in your sticks. In total you need - 142.5" of wooden hockey stick shaft.
  2. Wood for side panels and base - to build your Sixer to the dimensions I'm using your boards should be about 3/4" thick. You will need three boards measuring approximately 6 1/2" X 9 1/2". I used soft pine because it absorbs stain well and is easy to nail into.
  3. Stain
  4. Saw
  5. Wood glue
  6. Nail gun

Step 2: STAIN THE WOOD PANELS

If you want to stain your base and side panels do this first. I used a vinegar and steel wool solution to stain mine. Directions here - www.wikihow.com/Age-Wood-With-Vinegar-and-Steel-Wool

Step 3: CUT BASE

Cut a piece of wood to the dimensions shown in the picture. This will be the base/floor of your Sixer.

Step 4: CUT SIDE PANELS

Cut your side panels to the dimensions pictured here.

Step 5: CUT HOCKEY STICKS

The cuts will all be made out the shaft of the stick. Start as high as you can on the stick and use everything down to where the sticks narrows into the blade.

8 pieces 11" in length

3 pieces 9 1/2" in length

4 pieces 6 1/2" in length

Warning: The second time I built a Hockey Sixer I tried to economize my lumber by splitting (or ripping) the stick pieces on a table saw. This did not work out well. The fiberglass wrapping on the sticks frayed and created a splintery mess. If your sticks aren't too old you may still be able to do this, but it will change all the dimensions I reference in this Instructable.

Step 6: ATTACH BOTTOM STICK PIECES

Position two of the 6 1/2" stick pieces on the base, matching the width, so they divide the base into three equal quadrants. I can’t provide the exact measurements to position them because hockey sticks vary in width from one style to another. Divide the base into three equal portions, using the sticks the best you can. Glue the sticks into place, and then check yourself using some fat bottomed beer bottles (Sierra Nevada style bottles). Once you have your sticks in the right place, nail them to the base.

Step 7: ATTACH SIDE PANELS

Using the wood glue and nail gun attach the side panels to the base.

Step 8: ATTACH STICK DIVIDERS

Take two of the 9 1/2″ stick pieces and lay them on their sides against each other, on top of the bottom pieces you just nailed in. Position them running the length of the base, creating 6 equal quadrants on your base. Next nail your other 6.5″ stick pieces into position on the top of your 9 1/2″ stick pieces. Use the measurements from the bottom pieces of your Sixer, and position these top pieces adjacent to the bottom pieces as shown in the picture.

Step 9: ATTACH HANDLE

Position your handle, remaining 9 1/2" stick piece, as shown in the picture, against the side panels and nail it into place.

Step 10: ATTACH OUTER STICKS

Position your 11″ stick pieces along the outside of the Sixer, starting from the bottom, and nail them into place. Make sure to nail the pieces that meet the inner stick partitions to the partitions.

Step 11: ADD BEER!

Fill your Hockey Sixer with tasty beverages, show it off, and Enjoy! If you liked this please also check out puckoffopener.com.

Comments

author
emilyboda made it! (author)2017-01-23

I made these for some graduating members of my hockey team! They loved it. It took me a long time since it was my first woodworking project, but I learned a lot and it turned out well in the end. I didn't have enough sticks to do the sides like yours, but I kinda like the way I did mine too.

IMG_20170122_021332.jpg
author
Krj6 made it! (author)Krj62017-01-23

I love it! Nice work!

author
emilyboda made it! (author)emilyboda2017-01-23

Just a note: I had a really hard time finding sticks. Thankfully there were a bunch laying around the ice rink I go to, but I've also heard that used hockey places like Play It Again Sports have "project sticks" (basically just broken sticks) that they sell for around $2 each.

author
Fake__Plastic made it! (author)2016-08-04

Fantastic, now my old sticks can have a new and proud life

author
dannozanno made it! (author)2014-10-14

Really like the idea and looking to make a few of these for Christmas gifts. Posted an ad on craigslist for old hockey sticks, and got a few responses with "composite hockey sticks".

Don't much about hockey or the equipment...would composite sticks work out ok for this project? Or do they have to be wooden sticks?

author
Krj6 made it! (author)Krj62014-10-14

Composites require a totally different construction method. I am working on this and will post it as soon as I have it done. You can use the same dimensions, but they have to be attached differently.

author
koko33099 made it! (author)2014-09-27

Turned out great. Thinking about trying it myself!!

author
Robert Powell made it! (author)2014-09-11

It looks like there is a light on it.

author
Krj6 made it! (author)Krj62014-09-12

Mother Nature's approval.

author
solyper made it! (author)2014-09-12

Very Canadian!

author
seamster made it! (author)2014-09-11

Very nice!

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