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I use my Hario gooseneck kettle for making pour over coffee. I like everything about it except for its plastic handles, so I decided to carve new handles out of a scrap piece of walnut using my cordless drill. Carving with a drill is really easy using a brad point drill bit, a drum sander and a carving bar. I really like the idea of partial DIY projects that result in an upgraded and customized object. I'm excited to customize more of my stainless steel kitchen items with walnut handles so that they'll match.

Step 1: Supplies + Tools

Scrap Hardwood

Hario V60 Buono Coffee Drip Kettle

Carving Burr

Sanding Drum

RYOBI 18 Volt Cordless Drill

Step 2: Trace the Handle

Trace the outline of the original handle onto the wood.

Step 3: Drill Holes

I used a 3/16th diameter brad point bit to drill a series of holes around the traced outline. I like brad point bits for this task because their sharp points keep them from slipping when you drill holes right next to each other. I cut out most of the handle but left a small piece connected to the large piece of wood so that it would be easier to clamp and sand.

Step 4: Carve

I clamped the wood to my work table and used the carving burr to shape the handle.

Step 5: Sand

Once I hade the rough shape of the handle, I switched to the sanding drum and smoothed down the handle.

Step 6: Finish Cutting Off the Handle

After shaping the handle, I cut it off from the larger piece of wood with a drill. I used a knife to clean up a few of the drill marks.

Step 7: Sand

I used 120 and then 320 grit sandpaper to finish the handle.

Step 8: Stain

I finished the walnut with a coat of Danish oil.

Step 9: Cut Out the Top Knob

I didn't like the design of the original knob because it was too close to the stainless steel and my knuckles would bump into the hot kettle when I would try and remove the lid. I drew a completely new profile for the wooden knob and cut it out with the drill.

Step 10: Carve + Sand

I carved and finished the knob the same way as the handle.

Step 11: Remove Plastic Handles

I drilled a series of small holes through the plastic handle and then used wire cutters to clip away the plastic between the holes.

Step 12: Install New Handle

I drilled two holes in the walnut handle to accommodate the coffee pot's metal prongs. The handle fit on securely, but a 2-part epoxy can be used if you don’t achieve a tight fit.

Step 13: Screw on Top Knob

The original plastic knob for the Hario kettle screws off. I drilled a hole into the new wooden knob and screwed it onto the lid.

Step 14: Done!

Good luck making your own coffee pot upgrade and please email or tweet photos to @benuyeda or ben@homemade-modern.com. For more DIY ideas and projects, visit us at HomeMade Modern.

<p>I love that you use a drill for the 'cuts'...makes life easier for those of us too cheap to buy a dremel.</p>
Really enjoyed that :-) bet it feels much nicer
that is one nice looking pot!!

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Bio: HomeMade Modern is an online design source that publishes easy-to-follow, DIY recipes for creating modern home furnishings. We provide creative ideas for making affordable alternatives ... More »
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