Introduction: Homemade Limoncello

Limoncello is a relatively young Italian drink. Its history

is just a little fuzzy (must’ve had a few too many). People from Sorrento, Amalfi, and Capri have claimed ownership of the original limoncello recipe since about 1900. It is said that monks or friars invented limoncello because the monastery inhabitants wanted to get a bit tipsy in-between prayers. It has been a well-loved aperitif and digestive all around Italy since its conception and is gaining popularity worldwide. It is extremely easy to make and extremely satisfying to consume. Being made with grain alcohol, limoncello is a strong beverage. I’ve been burned more than once by the tasty lemon flavour that fools me into believing I can keep drinking. You’ve been warned.

Limoncello is best enjoyed cold, so keep it stored in the freezer. So, kick back after a long day of work and beat the summer heat with this refreshing, delicious booze.

Step 1: Ingredients and Directions

Ingredients

  • 12-15 lemons (or limes, tangerines, grapefruit or any combination of citrus you desire)
  • 25-30 ounces (750 mL) 95% or higher grain alcohol (I used Everclear, but vodka will do if it must)
  • 1 cup simple syrup

Directions

  1. Sterilize your mason jar(s) by filling with boiling water. Pour out the water once it is cool enough to touch.
  2. Using a microplane, zest the citrus. It is important to avoid getting pith (the white layer between the peel and fruit) into your zest as the flavour of your limoncello will be bitter if too much gets in.
  3. Put the zest into your jar and pour the grain alcohol in with it. Seal jar and screw lid on tightly.
  4. Shake the jar for about ten seconds.
  5. Write the date you started your batch on a post-it note and stick it on the lid so you can keep track.
  6. Place your jar in a visible place where you will remember to shake it twice a day for two weeks. Make sure to avoid direct sunlight.
  7. After two weeks, put your jar in a cool, dark place and let it hibernate for about a month. During this time, the lemon zest will release an intense flavour that makes limoncello unique.
  8. After a month, stir in the simple syrup, which can be made by boiling water and adding sugar at a 3:2 ratio. For every cup of water, use 2/3 cup of sugar. Let simple syrup cool before adding to the limoncello. Add syrup to taste. Replace in cool, dark place for two more weeks.
  9. Strain the zest using a coffee filter or cheesecloth. Discard the zest.
  10. Store in the freezer.
  11. Pour yourself a shot of homemade limoncello, add a bit of simple syrup and sip that aperitif before meals like a boss or after meals as a digestive like royalty.

Comments

author
Monsterguy (author)2015-07-22

Not that I'm suggesting you shouldn't, but I wonder if the sterilizing is necessary - wouldn't the strong alcohol do that job anyway?

author

You're probably right, Monsterguy, but why mess around? For me, it's a case of better safe than sorry.

author

I entirely agree, it's so little extra effort anyway.

author
Edbed (author)2015-07-22

This looks tasty. Can I suggest trying to use sfusato lemons (also known as amalfi or sorrento lemons) as they have a thicker zest and contain more of the oils which contain the flavour.

author
HabibasBeloved (author)Edbed2015-07-22

Oh yes, Edbed. I wish I had access to the Italian lemons. Some day, when I'm traipsing around Italy, I will make sure to get some Amalfi lemons and make some proper limoncello. Thanks!

author
Edbed (author)HabibasBeloved2015-07-23

Depending on where you are you might be able to. I am in England and you can find Sorrento lemons in some supermarkets (at least in London).

author
HabibasBeloved (author)Edbed2015-07-23

In the States, where I currently live, lemons come from California, Florida or Texas. It's quite difficult (and expensive) to find anything otherwise.

author
Pointy (author)2015-07-22

whoa..that easy huh..I might just give this a shot. awesomeness!!

author
HabibasBeloved (author)Pointy2015-07-22

I just started a new batch. It took a total of 20 minutes!

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Bio: I am an experienced cook, avid adventurer and diligent student of the culinary arts. I have dedicated much of my time and creative energy honing ... More »
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