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Step 5: DE-FLAKE

Dandruff can affect many different people in every age group. Dandruff can manifest as either very dry and flaky scalp or very oily scalp with flakes. Contrary to popular belief, dandruff is not caused by a dry scalp or from improper hair care. It can be caused by increased oil production, hormonal fluctuations, stress, and illness.

To banish a flaky scalp, try this simple recipe:

In a small grinder or blender, mix all ingredients on low for 30 seconds.

Wet the hair with warm water and shampoo the mixture into the hair well. Rinse with warm water.

Cover and refrigerate leftovers. Discard after 3 days!

I do not know if someone else has made this comment but if you would like to thicken up the shampoo so it is not quite so runny you can add 1/4 tsp. of xanthum gum powder that you can get from a local health food store to every cup of the shampoo. It will thicken up quite nicely the direction on the package normally say 1/2 tsp per cup but that makes it really thick start out at 1/4 and go up from there if you feel the need. I've been using it for years to double bottles of commercial body soaps and it does not leave a film or residue. Hope it helps
<p>I wonder if you can use baking soda to thicken it a bit?</p>
<p>Just don't add water to it. The castile soap is already liquid, so adding water to it really isn't necessary.</p>
<p>Castile Soap (at least Dr. Bronner's) is concentrated. If you are using it on your skin or hair it is wise to dilute it up to 50% (half water, half soap). Otherwise it can be overly drying or too harsh on your skin and hair. The Dr. Bronner's website for dilutions also instructs this. I've use it both ways and I have very dry skin and eczema. Diluting the soap makes my skin and hair much happier</p>
<p>Wow I don't know why it doesn't leave residue on you. Maybe you have more acidic water than our well water has? It leaves horrible sticky residue on my skin. I tried it one time and threw it away!</p>
<p>I had the same issue I used it for the first time last night and I felt like my hair was sticky as well as my hands and I had a horrible time trying to brush it out I used a wide tooth comb and that even felt sticky! I let my hair dry thinking maybe it was just while it was wet and I looked like I did when the stylist fried my hair it was nasty looking and felt awful! </p>
I've tried homemade shampoos before (worked alright but smelled awful --I am excited about these ones!) and what I found effective was to store it in a spray bottle rather than a jar. I would mist it over my head and then massage it into a lather. Pouring it on always ended up with using too much!
That is a brilliant suggestion!
Firstly, thanks for this instructable scoochmaroo, it's been very eye-opening for me :) Secondly, I have a question about the water...do you know if it's OK to use deionised water instead of distilled? I bought a big container of deionised after a shop assistant assured me they were the same, only to get home and google it to find that actually, they are slightly different. Do you have any idea if it will do the job? Cheers R
De-ionized water is great. Go for it!
...also, do you think this is suitable for using as hand wash...after all, it's got the tea tree oil's antiseptic qualities :)
I use this as my everything wash. Tea tree oil is great for my acne-prone skin!
That's brilliant! I am planning to use it the same way (I've just refilled all my hand wash dispensers and shower gel bottle with a batch) It just smells so damn nice :D Thanks again
Excellent! Thanks for letting me know :D
<p>I think what everyone forgets is that our hair is part of our body that we use chemicals on at least sometimes. Making a new shampoo might not be the best first step. Maybe making a good conditioner should be first, then a great conditioner. Then a shampoo you want to try on the tips of your hair. Or to test if your boyfriend really loves you. Then if it works maybe you try it. Like maybe after he proves he loves you like a week and swears by your shampoo. But start small. I mean if I told you I spent the last two years growing my hair out, but saw this post where this chick posted how she folded her scarf over her head and pulled a ponytail through it and just cut off the rest and it gave her the most awesome cut ever and I saw the after cut would you cut your hair off? Course not. Test in tiny batches first. Always!</p>
<p>Castille soap is not shampoo. It is soap. It is highly alkaline and only suitable for virgin, healthy hair. When I tried it my hair felt all gummy and then when dry it was like straw. Shampoo has surfactants and is pH balanced and mild. Soap is absolutely terrible for damaged or color treated hair! I'm glad at least the one person above is rinsing with apple cider vinegar-that will help bring the pH back, but high alkaline causes damage that can't be totally reversed.</p>
<p>Castile soap is not highly alkaline. It ranks somewhere around 8.9 on the ph scale. The ph scale runs from 0 to 14. 0-6 are your acidic items, 7 is ph neutral, and 8-14 are your alkalines. The closer you are to 7 the milder the substance. Based on this, Castile soap is very low on th alkaline side of the ph scale. My hair is colored and was also damaged previously. I have little to no issue using recipes with Castile soap. The only adjustment I've needed is to cut back on the soap a bit to account for some greasy residue. Also, as others have said it takes some adjustment to get used to not putting detergents in your hair. there are also some recipes that pair it with coconut milk for added moisture. The apple cider vinegar rinse helps greatly both with tangles and with removing some of the waxy residue. Also if you can find a good natural conditioner to use and rinse out that doesn't have sulfates or harsh chemicals in it try using some and rinsing it out well.</p>
I am a licensed cosmetologist who has studied the chemistry of hair and skin extensively hair and skin is naturally acidic and should always be between 4.5 to 5.5 on the pH scale therefore 8.5 is way too alkaline if you look at a hair under the microscope that has been in a alkaline solution the scales that should lay down smoothly will stick out causing the hair to dry out split and break. Using a vinegar rinse will make it more acidic again which is why that helps but what I don't understand is why people think that because something has been used for many years that it's natural or good for you which is the case with Castile soap it's not natural and it's not good for your hair. it has just been around forever. and why is it that they prefer to use vinegar rather than a well- formulated, ph balanced conditioner? just because something is in your kitchen doesn't mean it's natural or good for your hair skin. There are too many blogs going on about people's opinion and not enough of it has any scientific basis to it. Basically it says that you know if something tastes good and you can put it in your food then it must be good for your hair and skin which is total baloney.
<p>I, too am a cosmetologist (retired) and I know the cancer causing chemicals that go into products. You ask why people prefer to use vinegar instead of a well-formulated ph balanced conditioner. Go to the EWG (environmental working group) website and they will explain why so many people are trying to rid their bodies of these toxic chemicals - especially their children's bodies. We are not over reacting - we are getting cancer - our children's endocrine systems are out of whack and only God knows what else these companies are doing to to us. Well, I for one am saying NO MORE. It is not &quot;total baloney&quot; and you don't need a chemist degree to figure out what to use to cleanse your and your children's body and hair. I hope I have planted a seed in your thought process and you will look into this.</p>
<p>xanthum gum is a GMO product .</p>
<p>I really don't see how this is different than just buying a ready to use shampoo. If I want to make my own natural and healthy shampoo I am not going to use commercial castile shampoo but will make it myself. there are hundreds of great recipes on the internet on how to make shampoo bar that will be 100% natural. Also castile soap has poor cleansing and not so good conditioning.</p>
If I made this, could I add an essential oil blend for hair and then the other basic ingredients? I love this post by the way!
<p>another question...if I use the &quot;scented&quot; liquid castile soap do I need the essential oils also?</p>
<p>Well you can add different scents that go with your castile soap or just leave it. I don't bother with other scents because i am happy with the smell of my castile soap :)</p>
<p>@<a href="http://www.instructables.com/member/FaithRawks/" rel="nofollow">FaithRawks</a>:</p><p>Hahahahaha .... Baking Soda followed by vinegar.</p><p>I bet you got your jollies thinking you'd mess with people with that one. Shame.</p>
<p>It takes a while to adjust to this kind of shampoo. Because it's so runny, you need to use enough, to really get a lather up. I had an extreme reaction to hair dye, about 6 years ago, which has left me unable to use, even the mildest of shampoos. I HAD to make this work, and I'm really happy with the results. I have waist-length hair, &amp; I only need to wash it, once a week.</p><p>I found a recipe on eHow, that uses chamomille tea, instead of water. After a bit of tweaking, my recipe is: 1 cup of castile soap, 1 tsp of almond oil,1 cup of tea, made with 2 Tbsps (or 8 teabags) of chamomile flowers, &amp; lately, I've added 1 Tbsp of bicarb to it, and that's sorted a lot of the bugs out.</p>
Just wondering about the tea, so you add 1 cup of water to boil and add 8 teabags to it? Same with the flowers but 2 tbs? Thanks
<p>Can you use normal soap?</p>
<p>It takes a while to adjust to this kind of shampoo. Because it's so runny, you need to use enough, to really get a lather up. I had an extreme reaction to hair dye, about 6 years ago, which has left me unable to use, even the mildest of shampoos. I HAD to make this work, and I'm really happy with the results. I have waist-length hair, &amp; I only need to wash it, once a week. </p><p>I found a recipe on eHow, that uses chamomille tea, instead of water. After a bit of tweaking, my recipe is: 1 cup of castile soap, 1 tsp of almond oil,1 cup of tea, made with 2 Tbsps (or 8 teabags) of chamomile flowers, &amp; lately, I've added 1 Tbsp of bicarb to it, and that's sorted a lot of the bugs out.</p>
<p>It takes a while to adjust to this kind of shampoo. Because it's so runny, you need to use enough, to really get a lather up. I had an extreme reaction to hair dye, about 6 years ago, which has left me unable to use, even the mildest of shampoos. I HAD to make this work, and I'm really happy with the results. I have waist-length hair, &amp; I only need to wash it, once a week.</p><p>I found a recipe on eHow, that uses chamomille tea, instead of water. After a bit of tweaking, my recipe is: 1 cup of castile soap, 1 tsp of almond oil,1 cup of tea, made with 2 Tbsps (or 8 teabags) of chamomile flowers, &amp; lately, I've added 1 Tbsp of bicarb to it, and that's sorted a lot of the bugs out.</p>
If vinegar corrects the pH, can I use vinegar instead of water when mixing for dry hair shampoo?
<p>I have read on the Dr. Bronner's website that vinegar and castile soap cancel each other out. Just like vinegar and baking soda cancel each other, too. That's why you see a foaming acting when you combine the 2. Once the foam is gone, it's useless.</p>
<p>I have found that castille soap works great for me. I simply dilute it 3 1/2 - 4 parts water to 1 part soap. Takes around 2 oz to wash my hair (below the shoulder) and entire body. I condition my hair with vinegar water (about 1 vinegar to 1 water, adjust until your hair is soft and tangle free). When I first tried castille soap, my hair was awful. If it leaves a residue, you need to dilute it more. It took my hair a week or two to adjust to no chemicals, now it is soft and dandruff free!</p>
<p>Hello everyone! Can I use lavender oil in place of the peppermint or tea tree oil and will it make a difference? Thank-you!!!</p>
<p>i live in england and ive never heard of castile soap , so what can i use instead ? :)</p>
<p>amazon.com </p><p>about 20 a bottle (US dollars) but you dilute it to use for most purposes. Lasts a long time. </p>
<p>Castile soap is actual, TRUE soap, not detergent. Though real soap can also be made the same way castile is but with an animal fat like lard. Basically castile is the only real soap available to us that is not a chemical detergent (like what they use to degrease engines with). So when you hear of &quot;soap making&quot; or something along those lines you can be sure it's castile. I am allergic to detergents so I am now only using castile but since it's so expensive here in the US I have to be mindful not to overuse it, which is hard as I also have to use it to wash my clothes and bed sheets.</p>
<p>I recommend you either buy it from Dr. Bronners website, or find a local retailer: <a href="https://www.drbronner.com/DBMS/category/BABYMILD.html" rel="nofollow">https://www.drbronner.com/DBMS/category/BABYMILD.h...</a></p><p>Castile (cas-teal) soap is the original basic soap made from 100% plant based oils (originally it was made only from olive oil, but coconut oil is very popular due to its thick creaminess lather) Dr Bronners site also has a list of about 18 different uses for the liquid castile soap, In short, there really is not substitute for it. :)</p>
<p>Does anyone know if this can be used for body wash or hand soap? </p>
<p>works great as a body wash!! not as drying as regular soap!</p>
<p>I dilute it to 2-3 water to 1 castille soap. Lasts forever, does not take more than a couple tablespoons to get a loofah full of suds. </p>
<p>I use Dr Bronners for hand soap, in dispensers, diluted with water to prevent the dispenser from getting stopped up. I have also used it in the past for bathing, currently I am using something else though. </p><p>I am here cause my go-to shampoo has a new improved formula with lots of additives that will no doubt trigger allergies. Knew I needed a rinse to adjust the PH and needed info on a formula. I guess its 1/4 cup vinegar/ 8 oz water.</p>
<p>I cannot believe this. I tried the first shampoo mixture and it left my hair feeling the WORST it ever has in my life!!!! I am SO upset it looks and feels HORRIBLE, rough, i cant even get a comb through it and when it dried it looked totally waxy. I almost felt like crying!!! The castile soap was so DAMAGING i dont know what to do and am considering going back to shampoo for the horrible condition this mixture left my hair in. I'M SO UPSET DO NOT TRY THIS CASTILE SOAP MIXTURE!!!!!</p>

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