This was the first project I finished as an Artist In Residence at Instructables last July. The start of a fabulous time! 

This Instructable describes how to make this ancient toy with a modern laser cutting.

For those among you asking: “what is a hooey stick”, I refer to this excellent Wikipedia article. You might know this toy who’s origins are lost in time under another name like Gee-haw whammy diddle, Ouija Windmill or a VooDoo Stick.

Rubbing the ridges with a pen or similar round object makes the “propeller” spin. Just a little practise suffices to make it work. Controlling the direction it spins is in the way you hold the hooey stick and is a somewhat more tricky.

Here is a short video of my youngest daughter Imme making it spin:

I dedicate this Instructable to J, for setting us AIR’s up quickly to do some laser cutting and always being ready to.

Step 1: Materials and Tools

Sheet material:
The hooey stick is part of a series of laser cut toys and gadgets that are supposed to make a one-sheet (or two-sheet) advent calendar. Only elastic bands and machine screws + nuts are to be added. For this project I chose 3mm thick acrylic sheet. But the design for this hooey stick is largely thickness independent. The minimum thickness is determined by what is needed to hold the screw and nut. I guess 1.5 mm should still do. And as long as the “propeller” does not become too heavy it will still work with a larger thickness, probably up to 5 or 6 mm will still work. I expect it will also work when cut out of plywood.
The minimum sheet size is about 13 by 3,5 cm or 14 by 2 cm with an alternative design included in the next step.

The axle is made with an M3 machine screw (or bolt if you like), minimum 16 mm long (I used a 20mm one). A regular M3 nut is used to keep it in place.

Obviously the main tool is a laser cutter connected to a computer. I had the luck to be able to use a new 120W Epilog laser cutter in the new workshop at Pier 9.
A tool to tighten the machine screw (like an Allen key in my case) proved to be optional as tightening by hand is sufficient and even preferred not to crack the acrylic.
This is a classic case of using technology where it is totally unnecessary <br> <br>There is nothing wrong with this instrucable at all, but I teach kids to make these all the time with stick from a bush, a nail and a pocket knife. No electronic devices are needed, in fact, making it the old way is a lot faster. <br> <br>A laser cutter is serious overkill - kind of like designing a building a robot to wash your face!
A Complex tool for a simple task... I say let technology exist for technologies sake. Sometimes, its not about the hooey stick, but about the process... sometimes its about the finished product. Why would I print a page on a printer when I can simply transcribe it with pen and paper, why use a pen and paper when sticks and clay exist...
Dear Mr Chips,<br><br>Did you read through the entire Instructable? Because there is a very good reason why it is laser cut. As mentioned in Step 1 this is part of a laser cut &quot;advent calendar&quot; project. In that project the goal is to have a calendar presented as one or two sheets, out of which the parts for a series of toys and gadgets are cut.<br><br>So the question was not how can I make a hooey stick? But what simple toys can I make by laser cutting sheet material. The selected toys should be made out of flat parts and should be reasonably easy to assemble by the (young) recipient of the advent calendar. In this frame the hooey stick was one of the first to come up.<br><br>I make these hooey sticks with kids too. And when the kids are to young to handle a pocket knife we use large pearls strung over a skewer (as mentioned in Step 2).<br><br>Thanks for the interest,<br><br>masynmachien<br>
Why it can be rotated and What principles ?
Please follow the link to the <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gee-haw_whammy_diddle" rel="nofollow">Wikipedia article</a> mentioned in the intro.
Thx. ?
John Henry has met the machine... Har.!
I have to be honest. At first I thought this was the dumbest thing I'd seen in a long time, because just looking at the picture, I couldn't figure out what it was. But then I looked up your Wiki reference and read about it. That's a neat little toy! Its a terrific throw-back to the time when kids made their own amusement, plus the physics explanation for the gadget is an excellent way to impart a little science to youngsters -- IF they bother to read it, that is! LOL <br> <br>I don't think I'll be making one for myself, but I do appreciate your having posted it for us - thank you.
Nice :) Could also be used to demonstrate how screws come loose in low quality machinery ;)
you have to work and use the computer and internet, and if you can do that and dedicate some time each day then you can do this with no problem. I have been working with this for a month and have made over $2,000 already. let me know if you need go for home site then tab for detail ....&gt;&gt;&gt;&gt;&gt;&gt;&gt;&gt;&gt;www.bar17.com
Owwwww, very smart! Fav'd.
Ps: I'll see it in action tomorrow :-)

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