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Last year we cut down 2 ninety+ year old pine trees that were dying. Kept the bottoms and a top of the trees for end tables, and a bar table for next to the horse shoe pitt. Also made a bench for the fire pit but I will show that one later.

Step 1: Recycle Old Tree

Pick out your pieces for the table and cut as smooth as possible. A chainsaw is preferred but not required.

Please note I have been using a chainsaw for years and I always wear safety glasses, gloves, and safety paints for protection. Do not attempt this if its you first time with a chainsaw, they are very powerful and dangerous.

Step 2: Plan Height for Table

Stand the top of the tree up and plan for the height you want. I chose about 5 fott tall. I left some branch nubs to hang the horseshoes from when the table is complete.
Notch out the bottom of the trunk to be able to attach to the ground spike later. The spike I cut from an old 2 x 6 I had laying around. All of this is to give your table a firm base.

Step 3: De-bark and Smooth Out the Wood.

I left the wood dry in my basement for a year. This helped the bark dry out to make it easer to remove.
I used a sander on the top of the table and assorted tools tools to remove the bark. It all came off pretty easily, then just brushed with sander to remove ruff areas. Pine is sticky so it really needs to dry out. Plus its not the best wood working wood; a hard wood is preferable, but I really wanted to put the old tree to use.

Step 4: Stain the Wood

I had a left over gallon of Cedar-colored stain from when I did my deck. I used this on the trunk and the top of the table, as well as the end tables. The stain should extend the life of the wood and protect it from the elements.

Step 5: Wood Burning

This was my first time wood burning on Pine, and it is rough just because of how big the pine grains are. I sketched out what I wanted on the table top with a pencil and then burned away. Used an entry level burner from hardware store and about 4 different tips. Would sugest using a small fan to blow smoke away while burning.

Step 6: Seal Table Top and Install.

I used a polyurethane I picked up from hardware store, this will seal the top of the table and give it a smooth finish.
Then I took the spike I made earlier and drove it in the ground with slege hammer, close to the horseshoe pitt.
Then fasten the trunk to the spike using heavy lag bolts, making sure to plumb and level the trunk.
Then added table top to trunk and used lag bolts to fasten. Make sure to double check level of table top. I later added a bottle opener on a string for convince.

Step 7: Set a Glass and Enjoy!

Set the table off to the side to avoid the sometimes wayward horse shoe. I put the table under a pine tree next to the bench I made from the same tree.

Again please be safe and use caution when using power tools.

This was my first Inscrutable so I am anxious on the feedback.
<p>Hey very nice... I was wondering if you have issues with the top splitting. I did something similar and the top is starting to split open. I use teak oil for the finish but maybe I should have used a varnish? thanks</p>
Yup, the tip is splitting on mine as well. I used pine and did not slow the drying down. <br>friends of mine used epoxy to seal their tables and did not have a problem. same kind of epoxy at HD for hard wood counter tops. but other then that for my next one I was going to talk to some wood craftsmen and see what they think
maybe you could try these bow-tie keys to keep it from splitting any more. I think mine is split too much to do this technique.<br>https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DLQkk-x5CeI<br><br><br>
<p>This looks like an excellent addition to any backyard! </p>

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