loading

When a hose fails you can sometimes fix it with a new connector. Nice brass ones are often 5 bucks a piece:

Still it is often worth fixing the hose ( for instructions you might look at: Great, Easy and Cheap Hose Repair for the Garden and Elsewherel ) But when the hose in general has failed you may want to reverse the process and salvage the connectors while recycling the rest for some use other than a garden hose. Salvage is a quick process.

Step 1: Tool and Materials

Tools and Materials:

  • Hose to salvage
  • Hacksaw
  • Angle grinder
  • Pliers and Diagonal Cutters

Step 2: Make It

The hose ends on good hoses are nice pieces of brass. Typically they are held on by and inner and outer metal sleeve that grabs the hose. With the hacksaw or grinder cut a circle around the metal sleeve just slightly behind the business part of the connector: see the picture. When you are through the outer sleeve there is some hose material that you may cut or not, then an inner sleeve which you should not cut. When you are finished with the first cut use an angle grinder to cut across the sleeve as in the picture. With pliers and diagonal cutters get the outer sleeve off. The hose will now come off pretty easily. You now have a part ready to be used in some other hose project.

Step 3: Use It

For use in hose repair you just need a hose clamp, or for a nicer repair see: Great, Easy and Cheap Hose Repair for the Garden and Elsewhere

Step 4: Notes 1

Some hose have a handle that aids in connecting and disconnecting the hose. These are great, save them. They just slip off away from the connector.

Step 5: Notes 2

Here are a bunch of different connectors, some ae better than others. If they are just pressed out of sheet stock they are not as good as the more solid ones. You have to decide if they are worth saving. The plastic ones are often pretty good, better than you might expect. The one above was used in an old repair, salvage it just by disassembling the wire clamp.

<p>Those solid brass hex machined ones are keepers. Plug the end or solder it closed and put it on your water heater's blow-down valve outlet for a leakproof safety cap in case the inexpensive plastic stop valve they now build them with fails while you're out of town.</p>
<p>Nice tip, thanks.</p>

About This Instructable

1,539views

12favorites

License:

Bio: For now see me at: http://www.opencircuits.com/User:Russ_hensel
More by russ_hensel:Tic Tak Power Supply Difficult Dis-assembly: Taking Things Apart for Repair A Bit Better Bit Holder 
Add instructable to: