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OK, first things first. IF ANYBODY GETS HURT DOING THIS I AM NOT LIABLE. --- DO NOT DO THIS IF YOU DO NOT HAVE THE CORRECT WELDERS FILTER LENS. KIDS DO NOT TRY THIS AT ALL, ADULTS IF YOU TRY IT AND YOU FORGET WHAT YOUR DOING OR FOR ANY REASON GET HURT, I AM NOT LIABLE.

The pictures shown were taken through a welders lens. These welders lens are not of the same quality optics as an astronomy lens is, so as you can see the picture is not that clear. This may be related to me not knowing how to get the camera to focus correctly when I'm holding the welders lens in front of the camera.

The pictures shown I used a normal everyday digital camera (Samsung WB50F to be exact).

To take a picture:

1. Turn your camera on

2. place the welders lens in front of the camera as close to the camera lens as possible. I rest my welders lens against the rim of the camera lens.

3 as you start to move the camera towards the sun (while keeping the welders lens against the camera lens), hide your eyes behind the camera itself and look at the camera's view screen/view finder. It would probably be best to make something to hold the welders lens against the camera.

4. take your shot when you think you can with focus and zoom as best you can.

I did try to take a few pictures with my android phone, again with the welders filter lens right up against the phone's camera, but the camera on it is just really bad.

Step 1: How I Use My Binoculars

I do use the same welders lens with a pair of binoculars which does produce some great results. How I view with the binoculars is:

1. Get the binoculars you are going to use.

2. remove the protective lens covers from the binoculars if they are still on.

3. place the binoculars on a flat surface (table) so the rims of the front lens are completely on the surface. The eye pieces will be pointing in the air.

4. Take a 2 x 4.25 inch welders filter lens and place it on top of the binoculars eye pieces. I do not know the shade number. But I do know I am able to use it with or without the binoculars comfortably. YOU NEED TAKE YOUR OWN PRECAUTIONS WITH THIS.

5. This is a little tricky and don't face the sun yet, maybe look for something reflecting the sun, but what I do is grab the binoculars to use them as normal, keeping the welders lens on the eyepieces and then placing my forehead and the bridge of my nose against the welders lens sandwiching the lens between my head and the binoculars. The real key to this step is making sure at least one of your eyes are in line with the lens in the binocular eye pieces. Otherwise you will not see anything.

6. Once you are ready face the sun and try and find the sun in through the binoculars. DO NOT FORGET YOU ARE NOW FACING THE SUN, CAUSE IF YOU DO AND YOU TRY TO TAKE A PEEK, YOU WILL HURT YOUR EYES.

7. Once you see the sun through the binoculars focus as you normally would. Enjoy the view. I still don't look for then a few minutes at a time.

I really wish I had the equipment to get a picture through the binoculars. It was a much much better view.

<p>the TYPE of welding lens is important.</p><p>NASA recommends shade 10(or 12, I can't remember what their pdf said exactly).</p><p>On the other hand, the AWS(thats the welding people) say, go straight for a shade 14. It is darker and harder to see through, but it is the UV protection that you NEED! If it were just the white light that was a problem a shade 5(like dark sunglasses) would work... but even sunglasses with uv protectice films only work on uvA and uvB. For solar observations you also need uvC protection, and that is where shade 14 welding lenses come into play.</p><p>It isn't worth risking the only two eyes you will ever have, to watch a solar eclipse, just because you dont want to spend $5 on a proper filter.</p>
<p>I think the rating on the lens I have pictured are 10, but I'm really not sure. They are very old and they are hand me downs from a relative you passed away. I for one certainly don't trust any sunglasses nor would I use them to attempt this with. Not even on a camera I didn't want.</p>
<p>Deer Mike63</p><p>This is not <br>safe . If your eyes were to be exposed to </p><p>the sun light coming out of your optics it can hurt your <br>eyes.</p><p>A better <br>practice will be to place the welders lens in front</p><p>of the binocular, you need a better way to mount them secure <br>in your </p><p>optics to avoid accidental exposure to the sun.</p><p>Esdras</p>
<p>oh I totally agree, and one of these days I may take the time to make some time of hood. I'm not 100% sure a welders helmet will work. Since the farther away from your eyes the lens is the less detail you see. I may have to write up another way I check out the sun, but there are safety issues with that way as well.</p>
<p>Awesome safety information for watching a rare event! Thanks for sharing your knowledge!</p>

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Bio: Just a mild mannered programmer by day and a wannabe evil mad genius by night.
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