Computers are less complicated than they seem. when your building your computer  make sure you buy your motherboard first  because all the other pieces you buy need to be compatible with your motherboard or the computer wont work properly.
Another precaution to take is static, static will damage your computer components an anti static bracelet will ground you to your computer so the static is dis charged and it won't harm your pieces.

Step 1: What You Need

- Motherboard
- RAM( Random Access Memory)
- CPU(Central Processing Unit) With heat sync fan 
- Hard Drive and/or Solid state drive with brackets
- Power supply
-  A Casing  you can buy one or you can use an old one from an old computer
- sata cables( if the don't come wit the hard drives)
- video card if it isnt built into the mother board
- software 
- A Wire-less nic

This guide seems to have good info, but I think people would take it more seriously if you were to use better grammar.
Unless your case is grounded connecting your anti-static wrist strap to the case is not going to ground you. The only way your case is going to be grounded is if you have the power supply installed, and plugged in, and the wiring is correct for the outlet you are plugged into. In other words there are better ways to be sure you are grounded. I don't worry much about static when I build PCs anyways. Just touch the screw that holds an outlet, that will dissipate any static charge you may have. I hate wearing those straps.<br> <br> By the way I have that exact same power supply in this PC and inside of 6 months the fan started making terrible noises on me, so I had to pull the PSU all apart, take the fan out of it, and lubricate it. Yeah, when I bought it I thought Antec stuff was pretty good too. Turns out the fan they put into the value PSU is a pretty lousy one though. This is the one I found inside of mine:<br> <br> <a href="http://www.jab-tech.com/YATE-LOON-120mm-Case-Fan-D12SH-12-High-Speed-pr-3771.html" rel="nofollow">http://www.jab-tech.com/YATE-LOON-120mm-Case-Fan-D12SH-12-High-Speed-pr-3771.html</a><br> <br> <br> Some chainsaw bar lube and mine has been running fine now though. Either that or it completely seized up. At least it doesn't make noise anymore.<br> <br> <br>
There are self contained static absorbers... those are the ones that I like to use. My point of view on ESD is that there is always a chance that you are going to damage something unless you take proper precautions. Frankly, are you going to risk ruining a $600 dollar computer over a $5 ground strap or static absorber? <br> <br>Technically you are correct that it is not grounded unless it is plugged in, but the case of the computer is metal... it can help absorb ESD. Think about when you touch something metal (not grounded) when you have static built up... what happens? You get shocked. Why? Because you had a ESD into the metal. The ground strap just makes sure that you are always touching metal and it is transferred into the metal. Is it truly grounded? No... but it helps. (Again, this is why I use self contained straps)
Frankly I am skilled enough that I can keep myself discharged without using a strap. But I've been at this electronics stuff for over 40 years now. So what works for me may not work for everyone else.<br> <br> I don't think you've fully thought through what happens when you transfer a static charge to an ungrounded object. All you've done then is equalize the potential between you, and the object, you've lost some charge, but not all. If you stay connected to the ungrounded object then you really have not lost anything at all, just spread your charge out a bit more.<br> <br> Only a real ground can take your charge completely away.
you should place more images next time you make a proyect but it is good, at least you teach me how to do next time :)

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