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Step 1: Find Your Store

Go to Canadian Tire, Princess Auto, TSC, or another hardware store.

Step 2: Go to the Vices Section

Step 3: Find the Anvil

Step 4: Buy the Anvil

Step 5: Start Smithing!

<p>Used railroad track that is replaced is common and legal to buy, so get a receipt.<br><br>Taking railroad track from a track in use could cause a de-railment and a disaster, and would fall under the jurisdiction of the US (or substitute the country of your choice) Federal Railroad police. Just don't steal it... There is enough worn out stuff around. One can make a very nice anvil out of a small section of track.<br><br>And for starters a 5 pound anvil isn't bad for a jeweler. but for real iron working 50 to 100 pounds would be a step in the right direction.</p>
<p>My local Steel supplier will sell you any gauge of rail you want ? it is even listed in the application catalog they give out. I don't know how someone would know the difference between the RR owned track and something I bought at new steel priced. I live in willamette valley oregon, maybe it is a canada thing?</p>
I don't get how buying an anvil has to do with stealing from a railroad track.
<p>A enlightening instuctable indeed.</p>
Shhhhhh! Don't tell!
I must agree its dumb law... But the reason for it it to prevent people from stealing rail from off of the railroad (leftover rail placed on the side). I'm not sure who would enforce it, I do know that you'll be charged if you try to sell it to a scrapyard. I personally would love if it was legal to own such parts (spikes included). But, as my French ancestors would say, &quot;C'est la vie!&quot;
A Law against owning a particular shape of steel... In the &quot;land of the free&quot;... Weird, just Weird. And it is enforced? By who?
That's the peter btw. You really should at least tell everyone what to look for in a good anvil, or would you like me to?
<p>I was just testing you :)</p>
<p>Really?! That's just funny!</p>
That law is not enforced in every state but in canada you're right
<p>I dare you to name the states that don't enforce this law.</p>
In response to those of you that say to get a piece of railroad track, I am obliged to inform you all that it is a federal crime to own any part of a railroad -including the track- without a government permit. -even though I don't have a permit for my track-<br>
That is a nice picture though, did anyone help you with that anvil display? That Henry wright anvil does look familiar...
Ah, ironanvil. I believe we've met before? For the sake of all of my plentiful followers... I got the track at an antique shop, the Henry I got on kijji, the peter I got at a yard sale -or you got at a yard sale-
Could you maybe tell us where to find THOSE anvils? Especially that nice Henry...
I actually have three other anvils...<br>The first is a railroad track 40-50lbs<br>The second is a Henry wright English anvil 138lbs<br>The third is a Peter wright English anvil a little heavier than the Henry Wright
Till now I wasn't sure how to buy, but now as the leafs are blown from my eyes. I know how.
<p>Wow this is great, now I feel safe from attack from cartoon characters !! I too agree with the get a chunk of rail as these things are like dried up cheese</p>
<p>I know these anvils are cheap, but you get what you pay for. They're made out of cast iron and are very soft and brittle. 1/10 I do not reccomend the use of these anvils. If you want a cheap alternative to a real steel forged anvil, go out and buy a piece of railroad.</p>
That's awesome!<br>

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