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What is a Yorkshire Pudding (From Wikipedia)

Yorkshire Pudding, also known as batter pudding, is an English dish made from batter consisting of eggs, flour, and milk. The dish is usually served with roast meat (traditionally beef) and gravy and is a staple of the traditional British Sunday roast. It may also be served as a starter (with gravy) or a desert (with jam).

The exact origin of the Yorkshire pudding is, as yet, unknown. The first ever recorded recipe appears in a book in 1737.

The Yorkshire pudding is a staple of the British Sunday lunch and in some cases is eaten as a separate course prior to the main meat dish. This was the traditional method of eating the pudding and is still common in parts of Yorkshire today. Because the rich gravy from the roast meat drippings was used up with the first course, the main meat and vegetable course was often served with a parsley or white sauce. Traditionally, though less so now, the Yorkshire Pudding could be served as a sweet, with sugar, golden syrup, jam, or even with orange juice as a sauce. It is often claimed that the purpose of the dish was to provide a cheap way to fill the diners, thus stretching a lesser amount of the more expensive ingredients as the Yorkshire pudding was traditionally served first.

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Step 1: Ingredients

1 knob of Beef Dripping("a knob of" is a British term denoting "some") - Beef Dripping is beef fat that has been rendered down until it liquefies. It is then left to set and becomes what is known as cake. Basically a lump of solid beef fat. Its a traditional British ingredient that was used to deep fry fish and chips and is even spedible on bread like butter. I will do a instructable soon on how to make this amazing tasty ingredient. And it is very easy to make.

140g plain flour - If all you have is self raising then that will be ok but be prepared for your puddings to raise like a cake and not at the edges like the traditional yorkshire pudding.

4 eggs - Any size egg will do. Fresher the better. I have chickens (which I really recommend) as fresh eggs are simply divine.

200ml milk - I use whole fat milk as Its a lot creamier. Semi-skimmed or Skimmed (low fat) milk will be OK.

A pinch of salt and pepper - For seasoning.

Step 2: Heat the Dripping

Put a knob of Dripping into any size ovenware (baking pans,cake tin, pie dish, ramekins or muffin tins). Place into a preheated oven that is 230C / fan 210C /gas 8.

You want the dripping to be sizzling hot before you add the mix.

Step 3: Preparing

To make the batter, tip 140g plain flour into a bowl and mix in the four eggs until smooth.

Gradually add 200ml milk and carry on mixing until the mix is completely lump-free.

Season with salt and pepper.

Step 4: Cooking

Pour the batter into a jug, then remove the hot tin/dish from the oven.

Carefully and evenly pour the batter into the hot tin/dish.

You should see the mix starting to cook and raise.

Place the tins back in the oven and leave undisturbed for 20-25 mins until the puddings have puffed up and browned.

Step 5: Finish & Serve

Remove and serve immediately.

You could also cool and freeze for up to 1 month. Just reheat in the oven until warm and crispy.

You can cut up and use them for a starter. Just add gravy.

They are nowadays most commonly used on a main roast dinner.

If you're really feeling classy and traditional, serve with cream/golden syrup/honey/jam. Perfect for the summer

Any questions or if you want to keep up to date with my projects, follow me on Twitter - @KirkyTS

<p>My wife (from Lancashire) told me about a story that her mother told her : When her mother was a young girl (during the rationing days of WWII) there was a woman in the village whose Yorkshire puddings were always better and rose more than anyone else's, but she wouldn't tell anyone her secret recipe. It was later discovered that the woman was having an affair with the butcher and was getting an extra egg in her ration, which she put in her Yorkshire pudding batter.</p>
We usually have them with our roast instead of starter or main course. You can also cook this batter in a frying pan and make pancakes!
<p>I'm also a Lancashire Lass and your 's looks like a perfect YPud. I think one of the most important steps is the heat of the fat which must be sizzling and when the mix is poured in, it will immediately puff up. Your pic of the roast dinner is driving me mad I can almost smell and taste it. Well done.</p>
<p>Equal amounts of egg,milk,and flour works great too.<br>So basically a cup of milk,a cup of eggs,and a cup of flour.</p>
<p>Yuuummmmm!!! Funny how they were meant to fill you up &amp; make the expensive main course go farther, but honestly I would be very happy with just Yorkshire pudding and gravy. *wishing I had some now*</p>
<p>that is a big yorkshire pudding, ours are usually cupcake/muffin sized.</p>
<p>make a big one and put your roast and veg in it. </p>
<p>As esouthward says get the fat nice and hot so it smokes and sets all your smoke alarms off, then its hot enough. </p>
<p>----kind of like baked choux pastry. Yum!</p>
<p>Nope its nothing like Choux pastry, It's a lot heavier and denser. </p>
We have a family recipe called Dutch Baby that looks just like this, but is more like an oven pancake. This looks delicious!
<p>I once tried to make this but didnt get any rise.. perhaps better success this time</p>
<p>This may be due to the fat/oil not being hot enough. You want the fat/oil to be as hot as you can get it. You should see an immediate rise even before you put it into the oven</p>
<p>wow !!! good food <a href="http://www.friv-4.info" rel="nofollow">Friv 4</a></p>
<p>In Yorkshire we have them as a starter and ocassionally with jam for afters/dessert. Great recipe but the fat must be smoking not just sizzling and the oven for should be kept closed no peeking.</p>

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Bio: I love DIY and I would rather try invent or make something then buy it. I have just started playing around with Arduino and loving ... More »
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