Instructables

How To Make Christmas Lights Flash To The Music

Picture of How To Make Christmas Lights Flash To The Music
Introduction:
This post will show you how to make multiple strands of christmas lights flash to the music. We'll first begin with a video that demonstrates the circuit I have built and begin to build our knowledge from there. The circuit that I built was housed inside an exit sign. It can be housed in almost anything that it will fit into or could just not be housed at all. 





 
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Step 1: Geting Started

Picture of Geting Started
The Importance of the Relay:
The key electrical component in this circuit is the relay. Simply put, a relay takes the first voltage signal and acts as an intermediate to relay a second signal of a different voltage. So for instance, a signal voltage of 1V is transmitted to the relay; this triggers the relay to then send 10v in order to power an electronic. The relay is only responsible for transmitting or relaying one signal to another, in the case above 1v to 10v. The relay DOES NOT amplify the signal from 1v to 10v, so there must be a power supply wired into the circuit that allows for the final 10v signal.
So with the use of a relay, we can trigger a new circuit every time an impulse is received. This is the basic understanding of how we can make multiple strands of Christmas lights (or any other electronic) turn off and on to the pulse of music.

What You’ll Need:
Solder
Soldering Iron
Wire
Relay
Heat Shrink (recommended)

Which Relay to Buy:
Unfortunately they don’t sell the kind of relay you need at the local radio shack. So you’ll have to resort to either an electronic components website or ebay to buy your relay. There are two main criteria that your relay must fit into.

The relay must be a solid state relay. Solid state relays are just that, they remain solid and consist of no mechanical or moving parts. The older style mechanical relays might work but will mostly like not be able to stand up to the constant demands of being triggered on and off multiple times per second and soon fail if not immediately.The relay also requires one set of the terminals to be DC and the other set to be AC. The DC side should be as low of a voltage you can find; the lowest I have been able to find is 3v DC. The lower the minimum amount of DC voltage required to turn on the relay means the quieter you will be able to play your music and have the relay working. The AC side of the relay should be either 120 or 125v (the same voltage as your house) and consist of as many amps as possible. The more amperage means the more stuff you can plug into the circuit and have it operate to the music.

Links to Relays For This Project :

http://www.mouser.com/ProductDetail/Crydom/CN240A05/?qs=sGAEpiMZZMtHD6BhCPGf2qlFpaMgsWnJZb9hh1%252bhEF8%3d

This is the relay I used (I found one on eBay for about $10):

http://www.wellgainelectronics.com/heinemann100-5a-140.aspx

AlexanderD104 months ago
i built the simple circuit but my lights just stay on..... any suggestions?
muddog154 months ago
How would that be a dead short?
muddog154 months ago
$17.00 Shipping. Ouch!
muddog154 months ago
http://www.ebay.com/itm/CRYDOM-3-32VDC-INPUT-120VAC-10A-SOLID-STATE-RELAY-D1210-LOT-OF-2-/310432785065?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item48473c62a9
Remag12341 year ago
A little confusion about the relay. mouser.com is charging $12.95 and wellgaineelectronics is charging $34.50. Question is can either be used with the same results?
muddog151 year ago
how many lights can i power with a 25 amp relay
you may want to look at second switch...schematic not drawn properly....yes it will turn off, but not by switch, but by house breaker. Drop a wire across 120v positive to the neutral and what happens...dead short, but your first pic is good and must say what a brilliant idea!!
hey, ive been looking to do this for awhile. and id just like some explanation on the "stereo output" side of the project if you dont mind explaining
The stereo output is just simply the two wires (usually red + and black -) that extend from your stereo to the stereo's speakers. In reference to the picture you may use any postive and negative port. I just simply used the unused ports.
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tamahlg2 years ago
That is sooooo hot!!! Thanks for this instructable! I am setting up white lights for a party in a few weeks and this is going to take it over the top!
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