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I call it Oogoo, an inexpensive silicone clay that is easily made. It can be used as an excellent substitute for Sugru. It can be hand molded or cast in forms. Or, it can be used as a casting silicone. It can be colored any color from white to black. It can also be made translucent to allow diffused light to shine through. It can even be painted on in thin layers. It has very good adhesive qualities and will stick to itself, glass, fabric, paper, wood, and some plastics and metals.

This instructable will show :

1- How to mix and color Oogoo

2- How to cast it or hand form it into different shapes.

3- How to make silicone paint

4- Several interesting uses for Gorilla tape and Gorilla Glue, see steps 3, 7, 12 and 15.

5- How to make a few projects using Sugru and a comparison of Oogoo and Sugru


Since I am mainly interested in using Oogoo to embed electronic circuits in flexible forms, this instructable will also show you how to:

1- Make a soft circuit LED pumpkin head robot display that can be embedded on to clothing.

2- Make cleanly etched conductive fabric circuits

3- Make conductive glue using Gorilla glue.

4- Embed circuits in Oogoo or Sugru


The intro pic shows a few of the silicone shapes that I made using Oogoo and a funky, smirky, flexible pumpkin head robot LED display.


Step 1: How It Works

pic2 shows a 2"x2"x2" solid silicone cube that cured enough in two hours to be removed from its plastic box form.

For years I have been looking for an inexpensive way to create a flexible skin covering for robots and electronic circuits. I have tried several kinds of casting urethane rubber and silicone rubber. They all have their difficulties and either set up to fast or too slow. They are too thin or they are too thick. They are also very expensive in small quantities. Added to that is the problem that they have a very limited shelf life and usually must be used within six months. Sugru is great, but it is not affordable for making larger structures.

I and many others have tried using the inexpensive silicone caulk that is readily available from hardware stores. It is used to seal roofing and glass windows. It works fine but has the problem that it can only be used by putting it on thinly and waiting a long time for it to cure. It is also hard to work. It must be smoothed immediately while it is very sticky. Otherwise, the surface cures quickly and then forms a gummy film while the inside remains soft and wet. It has a smoothing time of seconds rather than minutes. If you put it on too thick the inside will remain soft and can take several days to finally cure. People have tried all kinds of additives in an attempt to make it cure in a more useful manner. I have found those additives to be unusable for my purposes.

So I wanted to add a catalyst that would help the silicone to cure from the inside out rather than just from the outside in.

As I understand it, 100% silicone caulk works by the moisture in the air initiating the polymerization of the silicone. So it cures from the outside in and as it does, it allows the water vapor to slowly seep inside and eventually cure the unexposed silicone. While it cures, it gives off Acetic acid (vinegar is diluted acetic acid) which is the strong smell you will notice if you use it.

I experimented with quite a few additives to try and introduce some moisture into the uncured silicone. Several of them worked to some degree, but the hands down favorite was also the least expensive.

It turns out that corn starch is highly absorbent and when sitting around in an open box it will absorb moisture from the air. It is an extremely fine powder that diffuses evenly in mixtures. By adding the right amount of corn starch, the sticky silicone is somewhat stiffened and very quickly starts to set up from the inside out. While it still sets up faster on the surface than in the middle, the whole thing will set up in five minutes to 2 hours no matter what the thickness. The actual curing time depends on the temperature, the humidity, the amount of corn starch added, and the speed at which it was mixed.

So that's it. Oogoo is corn starch and clear silicone caulk mixed together and then molded by hand or by forms to create just about anything you can imagine that needs to be adhesive initially and solid yet flexible when cured.


Step 2: Materials

Materials to Make Oogoo:

100% clear silicone caulk-the kind that gives off the vinegar smell while it cures. Can be found in any hardware store or Walmart. It cost from $3 to $5 for a 10 oz. tube. The newer silicone caulks that have a different smell such as GE silicone II will not work for this.

Caulking gun for silicone tubes.

Mixing cups

Popsicle sticks

Gorilla instant glue

Gorilla tape

100% Corn Starch

Linseed based oil paints to color oogoo


Materials to embed an etched circuit:

Clear Contact vinyl shelf liner from Walmart or hardware store.

Ferric Chloride etchant

Gorilla white glue

Surface mount LEDs

Magnet wire or conductive thread

Veil shield conductive cloth from http://www.lessemf.com/


Step 3: Mixing Oogoo

Mix By Volume
As stated before, Oogoo is simply a mixture of clear silicone caulk and corn starch. It can be mixed anywhere from 5 to 1 to 1 to 2 silicone to corn starch by volume. Up to a point, the more corn starch you add the faster it will set up. I like to mix it in small disposable cups using a Popsicle stick that is wrapped with Gorilla Tape to create a spatula. See pic4. Once it cures the Oogoo peels easily off the tape wrapped stick and the mixing/spreading stick can be reused.

Mix In Small Amounts
A good starting mixture to try out is 1 corn starch to 1 silicone by volume. It is easiest to mix it in small quantities so as to have plenty of time to work it. To see how it works, you could start with 1 tablespoon silicone caulk to 1 tablespoon of corn starch. You can reduce the amount to as little as 1/4 tablespoon corn starch to 1 tablespoon silicone if you want more time to cast it or sculpt it. I rarely mix up more than 3 tablespoons of silicone at a time.

The dry starch and sticky silicone do not want to easily mix. But if you are persistent and keep quickly stirring and mashing the mix, they will eventually merge into a thick paste. The resulting Oogoo is very sticky and will stick to anything that you spread it on. Most things it will stay well glued to. On a few things like some plastics and metals, it will easily peel off after it has cured.

The resulting Oogoo is a nice reflective white but I recommend coloring it so that you can easily see if you have an even mix. See the coloring step.

WARNING: While mixing, Oogoo will give off the strong smell of Acetic acid which can be irritating to the eyes and respiratory system. I strongly recommend that the mixing and forming be done outside or in a VERY WELL VENTILATED room. You should also wear nitrile gloves while mixing as the uncured silicone contains other solvents that might be absorbed by the skin.

One recurrent problem with silicone caulk is that once opened, it will tend to set up in the tube tip. To get a good seal I have had good luck using Gorilla tape wrapped over the tip. See pic4b. If you leave a quarter inch gap between the wrapped tape and the tip you can squeeze out just enough silicone to seal the tip well from air and moisture.


Step 4: Hand Molding

Pic5 shows the fresh mix mounded up to create a glass stopper. Pic6 shows the final hand molded form.

Oogoo can be hand molded onto or around just about anything. However, you will have to move fast as the fast mix will fairly quickly go from sticky to putty to a clay like material in just a few minutes.

Mix up some Oogoo as quickly as you can and then use the mixing stick as a spatula to spread the Oogoo on whatever you want it to stick to. While it is sticky mound it up to a shape that is roughly what you want the final shape to be. Let it set up until it is barely sticky and then start patting it into the form you want. At some point it will be like clay and can be fine tuned to its final shape.

Fast Mix
A mix of 1 corn starch to 1 silicone caulk will be like a putty in 1 to 2 minutes and can then be hand smoothed. In 3 or 4 minutes it will be like clay and can still be molded but is hard to smooth. So, you only have about 5 to ten minutes of working time with this mix.

Slower Mix
A mix of 1 to 3 or 4 will give you up to thirty minutes working time. A 1 to 5 mix can give you an hour or more working time. Depending on how fast it is mixed, the thickness of the structure, the temperature and the humidity, the slower mixes will turn solid and rubbery in from 5 minutes to an hour.

If while mounding your shape, you run out of Oogoo, don't worry as you can just mix up another batch and add to it while it is curing. A fresh mix will stick really well to Oogoo that is curing or even Oogoo that has cured for several days.


Step 5: Coloring Oogoo

I was pleasantly surprised to discover that all it takes to create vibrant colors in Oogoo is very small amounts of linseed based oil paints. Apparently the pigments in oil paints are very fine and dense so a little goes a long way.

About the equivalent of 5 or 6 drops of oil paint per teaspoon of silicone will result in solid colors. I mix the color well with the silicone before adding the corn starch.

While you can leave it white, it is a good idea to add some color to make it easy to see if you have a well mixed batch. Adding color does not appear to significantly effect the hardness or flexibility of the final result.


Step 6: Sanding and Carving Oogoo

While you can cut Oogoo with a knife, its rubbery flexibility makes it difficult to get precise cuts. It is more easily carved or sanded with power tools.

I used a stationary disk sander with 150 grit sandpaper to sand smooth the hand formed stopper in pic8. It sands cleanly but It is slow to sand, so before it cures, you should try to hand form the structure as close as possible to the final desired size. I made the mistake of not putting a mold release such as Vaseline on the glass vial and it was very difficult to remove the stopper after it cured.

Oogoo can also be carved with a Dremel tool and a high speed carbide wheel. Wait at least twenty four hours before carving smaller objects and up to several days for thicker ones. Do not carve until the strong smell of acetic acid is mostly gone when you put it up to your nose. Otherwise you will be shooting very small particles containing irritating acid into the air. Not Healthy. Do this outside with a filter mask or with a good vacuum system.

Step 7: Casting Oogoo

Casting In Plastic Containers
Just after mixing, Oogoo is very adhesive and will stick to almost anything. It will not remain stuck to some plastics such as PVC, polyethylene and polycarbonate. So any kind of container made out of these plastics can be used as a form or mold. The blister packs used to package many products contains clean smooth forms that can be used as casting forms. Clear polycarbonate cups and dishes can also be used.

Pic9 shows a funnel shape that was made using the inside of a polycarbonate martini glass. The Oogoo ended up about 3/16" thick and is quite flexible. It could be used as a funnel.

Simply smooth on the mix to fill up the form in layers while working out the bubbles. It does not have to be done in one mix. A fresh mix will stick very well to oogoo that is setting up and also to older Oogoo that has fully cured. So layers can be added at any time.

Casting in Gorilla Tape
Oogoo does not stick to Gorilla Tape so the inside or outside of any container or surface covered with the tape can be used as a form. After it cures the Oogoo will peal easily off.


Step 8: Making Tubes, Sheets and Laminations

Forming Sheets
It is easy to make sheets of Oogoo. Simply spread out a mix between two layers of clear polyethylene and then roll it with a round object as if you were working dough. See pic10. I like to use polyethylene plastic from gallon freezer bags. If you put down spacers of thin wood or metal you can keep the thickness uniform.

Once flattened, If you just want a single sheet, then wait 4 or 5 minutes and then peel off the top layer of plastic. This will leave a very smooth surface top and bottom.

If you want to work it more, then peel off the top plastic after 2 or 3 minutes while it is still a bit sticky and then form around whatever you want it permanently attached to.

Making Layers
To make layers, make one layer and let it set up until it is fairly stiff and then roll out another layer nearby. When it is set up enough pull of one layer of plastic you can then stick it on top of the first layer. You could embed whatever you want between the two layers such as a tool blade or a printed circuit board. Pic11 shows a three layer lamination.

Making Tubes
Tubes are a bit more tricky and require fast working. Use a plastic tube or wrap Gorilla tape around a dowel to create a form that the Oogoo won't stick to. Make a sheet of Oogoo that is wider than the diameter of the form. As soon as you can, peel the top layer of plastic and wrap the sheet around the form. Make sure there is overlap where the edges meet and quickly smooth out the seam.


Step 9: Make It Glow

Oogoo Lighting
Oogoo has many possibilities for lighting fixtures or light ribbons. Pic12 shows a 4" translucent cube that was made by coating an acrylic cube that I had with a thin layer (about 3/16") of translucent Oogoo. It was then lit up using a 1 watt white LED.

The Oogoo can be made translucent by using a 1 corn starch to 3 or 4 clear silicone caulk mix.


Step 10: Making Silicone Paint

Pic13 shows the final robot pumpkin head with LEDs all on. I used it to experiment with different mixes of silicone paint.

This is not a new idea, but silicone paint is easily made. Simply add naphtha or mineral spirits (paint thinner) and oil paint to the silicone caulk until you get the consistency of paint you want. The only problem with the paint is that it dries much weaker than silicone caulk alone or Oogoo. It has lower adhesion and lower tear strength. Even so, it is useful for some things.

I like a 1 corn starch to 3 mineral spirits (or Naphtha) to 3 silicone caulk for a translucent white gel-like paint. For a paint that is thinner and closer to an oil paint thickness you can use a 1 cornstarch to 4 mineral spirits to 2 silicone caulk. The more solvent you add, the weaker the final strength and adhesion will be.

You can also use acetone, xylene, or toluene but they all have nasty fumes and take several days to dissipate in thicker applications. The Naphtha has the advantage that it evaporates fast and loses most of its smell overnight.

Solvents that give off less noxious fumes and can be used to thin Oogoo and Oogoo II are turpentine and Citrus Solvent. Their only problem is that they can take several days to evaporate in a thicker cast of silicone rubber. For paint thicknesses they work fine but set up pretty slow.

Step 11: Etching Conductive Cloth for Soft Circuits

Pic14 shows a ribbon cable made of etched conductive cloth (Veilsheild). LEDs could be glued on it to make a light ribbon. Clean and sharp conductive traces like this are possible using the method described  below.

For the robot pumpkin head circuit I wanted to etch a very simple pattern as I was going to be trying several new techniques to glue and laminate the circuit.

The problem has always been to find an inexpensive, simple way to get a resist that is removable but will etch sharp high resolution conductive traces. I experimented with all kinds of tapes but they were either not waterproof enough or they had so much adhesion they peeled off the conductive coating on the fabric.

I finally tried clear vinyl shelf liner. It is just sticky enough to keep out the ferric chloride etchant, but not so sticky that it wont come off cleanly. the conductive cloth is placed on a piece of shelf liner with its sticky side up. this seals the back side. Another piece of liner is cut with a sharp x-acto knife to remove vinyl wherever the circuit needs to be etched. The conductive cloth is then sandwiched between the two layers of shelf liner. See pic15.

The cut traces are then burnished with a Popsicle stick to make sure the edges are adhered well to the cloth. It is then dipped into ferric chloride etchant for five minutes at room temperature. As soon as it looks well etched, it is removed and immediately submerged in a bucket of water and swished around. Remove it from the water and then rinse it some more to be sure all the etchant in the fibers is removed. the shelf liner can then be slowly peeled off and the cloth left to dry. Pic16 is the final cloth circuit board.

I have been experimenting with etching conductive cloth for several years. For some of the results see here: http://www.instructables.com/id/Conductive-Fabric-Make-Flexible-Circuits-Using-An/


Step 12: Glue The Circuit and Laminate It

Making Conductive Glue Using Gorilla Wood Glue
To make a flexible pumpkin head Led circuit, a way to glue the components to the cloth circuit board is needed. Gorilla Wood Glue can be easily made conductive and still have good adhesive qualities.

Mix by volume: 3 powdered graphite to 2 Gorilla white glue. The powder is reluctant to mix but keep at it till you have a sticky paste. You can then blob it onto the wires you are gluing to the conductive fabric traces. While you can add a few drops of water to make it easier to work, this will increase somewhat the final resistance of the conductive joint. Let it dry overnight.

This conductive glue has a very low resistance and is good for connecting two conductors that are close to each other. You can obtain powdered graphite from: http://www.elementalscientific.net/

Pic17 shows how the glue joints looked after the led wires were glued to the conductive circuit board. Because the PLCC2 surface mount LEDs do not have enough surface area to directly glue them with conductive glue, I first soldered thin tinned lead wires to them. This gave more surface area to the glued conductive joint. I zigzagged the leads thinking that might increase the flexibility of the final result.

Gorilla Tape Helping Hands Jig
See pic18b for a helping hands jig I used to hold the surface mount LEDs and thin wire while soldering. It is made of Gorilla Tape taped sticky side up on a piece of cardboard. I had previously used blue tac for this, but this works just as well.

Laminating the Pumpkin Head
Pic18 shows the pumpkin head after laminating with orange Oogoo. The Oogoo was cut off to expose the LEDs. Translucent and colored Silicone paint was then used to finish the pumpkin head.

I have been experimenting with conductive glues for a few years. For other ways to make and use conductive glues see here: http://www.instructables.com/id/Make-Conductive-Glue-and-Glue-a-Circuit/


Step 13: The Robot Pumpkin Head Circuit

The LEDs are flashed in sequences using a 08m Picaxe microcontroller. See pic19. The resistance of the conductive glue joints is high enough that no dropping resistors are necessary. In order to keep the leads to a minimum, Charliplexing is used to control the six LEDs individually. This is a simple way to use 3 wires to control 6 LEDs.

I will try an post a video of the flashing pumpkin head LEDs and code when I get more time.

For details on Charliplexing see: http://www.instructables.com/id/Charlieplexing-LEDs--The-theory/

I did not have time to make an embedded control circuit, so it was just breadboarded. See pic20.

Step 14: Comparison of Oogoo and Sugru

Pic21 shows a eyeglass holder made with sugru on one side and Oogoo on the other to hold on the neoprene neck strap.

Pic22 shows a small coin cell flashlight I made on a circuit board and then covered with Sugru.

Pic 23 shows a Picaxe circuit I laminated on the bottom side with Sugru to protect the thin wires on the back and keep it from shorting.

I experimented around with several packets of Sugru to see what it would stick to and to see what it took to mold it to clean shapes.


Advantages of Oogoo:

1- Made from inexpensive and easily obtained materials.

2- Easy to work and mold into forms.

3- Will set up quickly at any thickness.

4- Can be mixed in any color.

5- translucent structures possible for lighting aplications.

6- slightly more flexible than Sugru.


Advantages of Sugru:

1- Much milder fumes, can be easily used indoors.

2- Cures to a harder rubber.

3- Gives more working time.

4- Already mixed.

5- Somewhat easier to smooth.

6- Carves easier than Oogoo.



Step 15: Other Possibilities

Pic24 shows the LED robot pumpkin head mounted on a T-shirt. It can be glued with silicone caulk onto most fabrics and should be able to handle hand washing.

Pic26 shows the flexibility of the final circuit.

Make Conductive Rubber And Robot Skin
See here: http://www.instructables.com/id/Conductive-Rubber-Make-Touch-Sensitive-Robot-Skin/

Make Conductive Rubber And A Transparent Capacitive Stylus For Ipod, Iphone, And Ipad
See here: http://www.instructables.com/id/Make-Conductive-Rubber-Transparent-stylus-iPodiP/

Making Ooglo: Luminescent Silicone Paint
See here: http://www.instructables.com/id/Making-Ooglo-Luminescent-Silicone-Paint/

Halloween Costumes
All manner of masks and appendages can be made using Oogoo. It sticks well to cardboard and paper and almost anything. You can use it to glue almost any part of the costume together and it sets up faster than most glues. Be sure not to create anything where you will have to breathe near freshly formed Oogoo. Let it sit a day or two and use it only after the vinegar smell is gone.

Make Your Own Lego Parts or Interlocking Blocks
All kinds of interlocking building blocks or circuit modules could be built.

Making Prototypes
Electronic cases of different kinds can be quickly hand made with Oogoo. It might even work as a forming material for a 3d printer or rapid prototype machine.

Stained Glass
Colored Oogoo sticks very well to glass and can be used for various stained glass effects.

Woodworking
It should be possible to make hinges using thin flat sheets of Oogoo glued to wood boxes or cabinets. It may also be possible to use it to make flexible joints for furniture.

Casting Metal
Metals that melt at low temperatures can be cast in Oogoo. See pic25 for a ring I cast out of bismuth.

Gluing to Plastics
Near the end of this, I discovered that Oogoo can be glued to many plastics using Gorilla Super Glue. If after it cures it peals off the plastic, try re-gluing it using a thin layer of super glue.

<p>Just made it. As regards mixing, I found a quicker, cleaner and more through way. I was forced to rethink the mixing process as my wife looked at the clouds of cornstarch and growing pile of broken popsicle sticks with some dismay. And I was getting frustrated as the mixing process was not easy.</p><p>I spread a plastic bag open on its base, squeezed a pile of silicone caulking into the bottom. I measure a similarly sized heap of corn starch next to it (giving a rough 1:1 mix), then I closed the bag, without sealing it, forced everything into one corner and mashed/kneaded it with my fingers on the outside of the bag.</p><p>It all mashed together very quickly and very evenly, and very cleanly. It scraped easily off the bag when I started to use it.</p><p>When moulding it around the joints in the pic, I found initially that I started too soon while the mixture was too sticky. I think, because I managed a very quick mix, I had longer to work with the Oogoo. And after I finished the work in the pic, I still had a soft still-kneadable and non-sticky lump to play with.</p><p>Really wonderful stuff!</p><p>In case you're wondering, the make in the photo is a prototype for a project and I didn't waste any bits - after I prove the concept, I will build a permanent model and use real PVC cement.</p><p>Great stuff, this Oogoo.</p><p>PP</p>
<p>Is this Oogoo UV stable? I'm want to repair my van's deteriorating window seal which will be in the sun and weather.</p>
<p>I don't know about this &quot;Oogoo&quot; but for my old car I used a clear acrylic sealant. It works perfectly and sets clear and flexible..better than silicone. Cost about &pound;10 a tube. Make sure it's the &quot;outdoor&quot; variety otherwise it becomes soluble in water.</p>
<p>I'd suggest comparing silicone compounds and finding one that brands itself as &quot;UV resistant&quot; or &quot;won't crack or fade in sunlight&quot; etc.</p>
<p>J great stuff J just wondering if this stuff<br>is food safe?</p><p>The dentist wanted 120 yoyos for a new set<br>of bruxism guard (night grinding) so I<br>mould my self a set from alginate and cast one from plaster and used sugru to<br>mould which worked very nicely probably better then the first ones I got from<br>the dentist.</p><p>However I learnt that these are not food<br>safe thus I&rsquo;m looking for another material to use.</p><p>It be great if this stuff would work if not<br>can you recommend a material that is?</p>
<p>Probably too late to be of much use but if you rename this &quot;sports mouth guard&quot; they are under $10 at sporting good stores. Basically the same thing. No medical proffesional involved.</p>
<p>There is a one component food-safe version of silicone caulk. It is still based on the water-curing, acetate-releasing mechanism which this project is using.</p>
<p>and that is?</p>
<p>Oogoo is awesome, but if you make it with the regular clear hardware store silicone it is extremely NOT FOOD-SAFE, don't put it in your mouth. You can buy two-part food-safe silicone mold making material, that might work for what you are describing. (Do your homework on that, I'm just suggesting it as a possibility.) When trying to find this sort of information, the first thing you want to check is the msds (safety data sheet (SDS), material safety data sheet (MSDS), product safety data sheet (PSDS) etc.) It's what the hospital uses to figure out how to treat people who put things in their mouths...</p>
<p><a href="http://www.msdssearchengine.com" rel="nofollow">http://www.msdssearchengine.com</a></p>
Will it stick to glass, I want to make a mold of a glass but don't want it to stick and ruin the cup.
<p>Amazing I seen your proprietary video . At least I think it was yours . With the little red box ? This opens a whole new world for people with Ideas . If I had only known years ago . There were soo many project that got stopped or rerouted . For lack or the abilities that something like this enables . Save money by making your own parts the list goes on . God Bless </p>
<p>Once the caulk-type tubes of silicone are opened, they will cure internally and become useless in a short time. If you have a food-saver type vacuum sealer, the tube can be sealed inside and will last much much longer. Even the low priced hand pump version will increase the shelf life of the unused silicone. The gallon size bags are difficult to find locally, but I checked Amazon and they are available there.</p><p>It's also possible (but not tested) that any unused oogoo left over could be saved in a vacuum bag.</p><p>If you use the hand pump vacuum bags, add a piece of adhesive tape on the vacuum flap of the bag to ensure it doesn't accidentally release and let air inside.<br></p>
<p>Can I use corn flour instead of corn starch?</p>
<p>Sure you can. Will it work? Maybe. Try it out and let us know. Mikey77 did a lot of research which probably included flour and decided cornstarch is best. Personally I'll stick to cornstarch but I would experiment with flour if I was in a hurry and I ran out of cornstarch.</p>
To be fair, it seems the brand he mentions in the article has been discontinued (at least that's what I was told by two hardware stores) GE seems to just be making the II and Supreme line. He only says 100% silicone and that it has be the type that smells a certain way and is clear. They have sealed tips in the store so you can't smell them. It just makes finding the ingredients take a bit of research. I went ahead and bought two to try because I'm still not sure which will work. FYI for those searching, some online stores seem to categorize it under Sealants and not Caulks. I hope anyone else who is still making Oogoo can comment with what specific products they use.
<p>Walmart still sells the right stuff. You don't have to smell it to ensure it's the correct product. Look on the label and you'll see it has a &quot;warning&quot; that says acetic acid is released during cure. Acetic acid is vinegar. The wrong silicone has a similar warning, but the release chemical has a longer name I've forgotten.</p>
<p>corn flour will work as its just the name used for corn starch in other countries and also to the people asking any brand of silicone will work just look for it to say 100%silicone and clear on the label ones that are not clear have a colouring agent and are considered caulk and not silicone as well the smell comes with the clear part as the colored ones dont have the smell if you are here wanting more info try a quick google of oogoo they even have an info card that pops up for it now since this instrucable basically started a crafting revolution.</p>
<p>Corn flour (as found in the US) is <em>NOT </em>the same as corn starch, and has very different properties. Corn flour is basically whole corn, finely ground (vs cornmeal, which is coarsely ground). Corn starch is derived only from the endosperm of a corn kernel, and has different properties -- primarily due to the higher concentration of starches (as the name suggests). The flour contains the gluten as well as the starch, whereas corn starch has been refined and separated from the other components of the corn.<br><br>That all said, since corn flour does <em>contain </em>starch, it may still get the job done in a pinch... but results may vary :)</p>
<p>I got mine at the Dollar General store. I got a tube just a couple of weeks ago - . It was either $3 or $3.50 for the tube.</p>
Has anyone tried plasticising gelatin with PEG, corn syrup &amp; vodka?<br> It would seem to have similar properties, although probably softer.<br> Using 100% silicone sink edge sealer, baby powder &amp; mineral oil seems to work well too!<br> Looking up plasticising in chemistry! (See! Those classes we took in high school ARE useful!)<br> Anyone have a recipe for the gelatin recipe to maximize plasticization?<br> Great stuff!!! Time to crack that old chemistry book?
This is a great tutorial. Love learnibg new DIYs.. Cannot at this time, but, will consider upgrading to &quot;premier&quot; to learn more of what you do. Thank you for this post.
<p>HELP: <br>Can someone in Australia provide the Brand Names of the Caulk used please, there are so many to choose from.</p>
<p>Silicone is either neutral cure or acetic cure (it will say on the packaging) - acetic cure is what you want and should be available in several brands and in clear, white or black (maybe more colours too)</p>
<p>Mark</p><p>I bought Parfix Window &amp; Glass (Clear) from Bunnings. I tried a Selleys white, but it has a different composition and doesn't set hard, more like rubber. From what I read, it seems any clear silicone should work. This one had a definite scent of acetic acid when opened &amp; it was the cheapest brand on the shelf :-) Seems to have worked.</p>
<p>help us out here...what brand of silicone DOES work?</p><p>Exactly what product did you buy to produce and prove out this instructable?... I can't afford to buy, open, sniff-test and throw away a $10 buck product based upon speculation and vague recommendations. I do, however applaud your time and effort in producing this instructable.</p><p>Chas</p>
<p>You can often tell from the warnings and directions on the tube. Most silicones will say something like &quot;use in well ventilated area&quot;, &quot;produces strong odor&quot;, &quot;May cause irritation&quot;</p>
<p>@<a href="http://www.instructables.com/member/hesynergy" rel="nofollow">hesynergy</a> Vague recommendations? Harsh! Did you by any chance check how many views this Instructable has had since it was posted 6 years ago. Or have you googled Oogoo? This Instructable is an institution that kicked off an entire craft revolution. Guess how vague the rest of us found it.</p>
<p>I just mixed up a batch with GE Supreme 100% Silicone, and it worked beautifully.</p>
<p>mikey77 is my hero. How many people create their own subculture, craft and construction technique all in one Instructable. </p>
<p>Cheers guys :)</p>
<p>Lots of cool applications possible. Thanks for posting such a useful Instructable!</p>
<p>Just FYI there are TWO types of Silicone I - clear and white. (I'm not referring to Silicone II which is also white.). I've found the white Silicone I to be far less effective than the clear version.</p>
<p>Curious, has anyone tried this with baby powder?<br>In the wiki description, sugru is made with talc.<br>While corn starch is a better choice for baby bottoms, might the mineral talc be a good choice of this? Experimenting soon.</p>
<p>Most baby powder nowadays *is* corn starch. Mineral talc was found to be dangerous to babies. So the only difference is price and scent. Usually the foodstuff version is cheaper.</p>
<p>Most baby powder nowadays *is* corn starch. Mineral talc was found to be dangerous to babies. So the only difference is price and scent. Usually the foodstuff version is cheaper.</p>
<p>I have a wooden object that I want to duplicate in a different material .. possibly HDPE. can I use saran warp to keep the Oogoo from sticking to the wood so that I can make a mould? </p>
Sugru SHELVING brackets hold weight; I'm wondering if anyone has experience with Oogoo to hold a SHELF?
<p>Hey, does anybody know if I could remove this? Real sugru apparently comes off if you need it to, and I'm planning to attach some sugroo/oogroo to my locker, but it can't be permanent. Does anybody know?</p>
<p>i do not know. but try this on a piece of metal then try different ways of taking it off.</p><p>For hot-melt-glue i use rubbing alcohol (RA) and tweezers. i close the tweezers then dip the point in the RA, then press the tip where the glue meets the metal. the RA then flows between the glue and the metal, separating the two.</p>
<p>will this work for casting aluminium? if no, could it stand lead?</p>
<p>use the lost wax method. <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lost-wax_casting" rel="nofollow"> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lost-wax_casting</a></p><p><a href="http://www.onlinemetals.com/meltpt.cfm" rel="nofollow">http://www.onlinemetals.com/meltpt.cfm</a></p>
<p>Dear Mikey77 and all of the helpful commenters here, thank you! This stuff is the bomb! My husband and I have been using it for 4+ years to make relief sculpture molds for our costumes. Over that time we've refined the method specifically for this purpose. Many artists ask us how we do it , so we just made a pdf booklet called &quot;Oogoo for artists&quot;. Check it out here</p><p><a href="http://organicarmorarts.com/product/oogoo-for-artists-book/" rel="nofollow">http://organicarmorarts.com/product/oogoo-for-arti...</a></p>
<p>I cannot express how amazingly wonderful this is without falling back on expletives. So just let me say from the bottom of my impoverished sculptor's heart, Thank You!</p>
<p>I found out that Zippo lighter fluid is also quite a good thinner for Oogoo, it cures at almost the same speed and I can't find any difference in cured texture. Granted, I didn't use a huge amount, just enough to make it easy to mix and spread. </p>
<p>When this cures, is it very flexible, or does it get rigid?</p>
<p>I wonder how long will it last or if it rots over time, maybe attract ants, roaches or other bugs?</p>
<p>Nope, it does not attract them. Made mine around one year ago, still the same like when it was made. The only thing is that it does not feel powdery anymore, since I use 1 to 1 ratio.</p>
<p>I put the silicone and the starch in a zip lock bag and stir it by kneading the bag until it begins to release from the bag. I can then handle it without it sticking to my hands. Time is short at this point, so I have my project set up already.</p>
it works and its a lot cheaper but it is messier and has some things it cant do but it feels real nice when its dry

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