loading

Step 10: Making Silicone Paint

Pic13 shows the final robot pumpkin head with LEDs all on. I used it to experiment with different mixes of silicone paint.

This is not a new idea, but silicone paint is easily made. Simply add naphtha or mineral spirits (paint thinner) and oil paint to the silicone caulk until you get the consistency of paint you want. The only problem with the paint is that it dries much weaker than silicone caulk alone or Oogoo. It has lower adhesion and lower tear strength. Even so, it is useful for some things.

I like a 1 corn starch to 3 mineral spirits (or Naphtha) to 3 silicone caulk for a translucent white gel-like paint. For a paint that is thinner and closer to an oil paint thickness you can use a 1 cornstarch to 4 mineral spirits to 2 silicone caulk. The more solvent you add, the weaker the final strength and adhesion will be.

You can also use acetone, xylene, or toluene but they all have nasty fumes and take several days to dissipate in thicker applications. The Naphtha has the advantage that it evaporates fast and loses most of its smell overnight.

Solvents that give off less noxious fumes and can be used to thin Oogoo and Oogoo II are turpentine and Citrus Solvent. Their only problem is that they can take several days to evaporate in a thicker cast of silicone rubber. For paint thicknesses they work fine but set up pretty slow.
<p>HELP: <br>Can someone in Australia provide the Brand Names of the Caulk used please, there are so many to choose from.</p>
<p>Silicone is either neutral cure or acetic cure (it will say on the packaging) - acetic cure is what you want and should be available in several brands and in clear, white or black (maybe more colours too)</p>
<p>Mark</p><p>I bought Parfix Window &amp; Glass (Clear) from Bunnings. I tried a Selleys white, but it has a different composition and doesn't set hard, more like rubber. From what I read, it seems any clear silicone should work. This one had a definite scent of acetic acid when opened &amp; it was the cheapest brand on the shelf :-) Seems to have worked.</p>
<p>Can I use corn flour instead of corn starch?</p>
<p>Sure you can. Will it work? Maybe. Try it out and let us know. Mikey77 did a lot of research which probably included flour and decided cornstarch is best. Personally I'll stick to cornstarch but I would experiment with flour if I was in a hurry and I ran out of cornstarch.</p>
To be fair, it seems the brand he mentions in the article has been discontinued (at least that's what I was told by two hardware stores) GE seems to just be making the II and Supreme line. He only says 100% silicone and that it has be the type that smells a certain way and is clear. They have sealed tips in the store so you can't smell them. It just makes finding the ingredients take a bit of research. I went ahead and bought two to try because I'm still not sure which will work. FYI for those searching, some online stores seem to categorize it under Sealants and not Caulks. I hope anyone else who is still making Oogoo can comment with what specific products they use.
<p>I got mine at the Dollar General store. I got a tube just a couple of weeks ago - . It was either $3 or $3.50 for the tube.</p>
<p>corn flour will work as its just the name used for corn starch in other countries and also to the people asking any brand of silicone will work just look for it to say 100%silicone and clear on the label ones that are not clear have a colouring agent and are considered caulk and not silicone as well the smell comes with the clear part as the colored ones dont have the smell if you are here wanting more info try a quick google of oogoo they even have an info card that pops up for it now since this instrucable basically started a crafting revolution.</p>
<p>help us out here...what brand of silicone DOES work?</p><p>Exactly what product did you buy to produce and prove out this instructable?... I can't afford to buy, open, sniff-test and throw away a $10 buck product based upon speculation and vague recommendations. I do, however applaud your time and effort in producing this instructable.</p><p>Chas</p>
<p>You can often tell from the warnings and directions on the tube. Most silicones will say something like &quot;use in well ventilated area&quot;, &quot;produces strong odor&quot;, &quot;May cause irritation&quot;</p>
<p>@<a href="http://www.instructables.com/member/hesynergy" rel="nofollow">hesynergy</a> Vague recommendations? Harsh! Did you by any chance check how many views this Instructable has had since it was posted 6 years ago. Or have you googled Oogoo? This Instructable is an institution that kicked off an entire craft revolution. Guess how vague the rest of us found it.</p>
<p>I just mixed up a batch with GE Supreme 100% Silicone, and it worked beautifully.</p>
<p>mikey77 is my hero. How many people create their own subculture, craft and construction technique all in one Instructable. </p>
<p>Cheers guys :)</p>
<p>J great stuff J just wondering if this stuff<br>is food safe?</p><p>The dentist wanted 120 yoyos for a new set<br>of bruxism guard (night grinding) so I<br>mould my self a set from alginate and cast one from plaster and used sugru to<br>mould which worked very nicely probably better then the first ones I got from<br>the dentist.</p><p>However I learnt that these are not food<br>safe thus I&rsquo;m looking for another material to use.</p><p>It be great if this stuff would work if not<br>can you recommend a material that is?</p>
<p>There is a one component food-safe version of silicone caulk. It is still based on the water-curing, acetate-releasing mechanism which this project is using.</p>
<p>and that is?</p>
<p>Oogoo is awesome, but if you make it with the regular clear hardware store silicone it is extremely NOT FOOD-SAFE, don't put it in your mouth. You can buy two-part food-safe silicone mold making material, that might work for what you are describing. (Do your homework on that, I'm just suggesting it as a possibility.) When trying to find this sort of information, the first thing you want to check is the msds (safety data sheet (SDS), material safety data sheet (MSDS), product safety data sheet (PSDS) etc.) It's what the hospital uses to figure out how to treat people who put things in their mouths...</p>
<p><a href="http://www.msdssearchengine.com" rel="nofollow">http://www.msdssearchengine.com</a></p>
<p>Lots of cool applications possible. Thanks for posting such a useful Instructable!</p>
<p>Just FYI there are TWO types of Silicone I - clear and white. (I'm not referring to Silicone II which is also white.). I've found the white Silicone I to be far less effective than the clear version.</p>
<p>Curious, has anyone tried this with baby powder?<br>In the wiki description, sugru is made with talc.<br>While corn starch is a better choice for baby bottoms, might the mineral talc be a good choice of this? Experimenting soon.</p>
<p>Most baby powder nowadays *is* corn starch. Mineral talc was found to be dangerous to babies. So the only difference is price and scent. Usually the foodstuff version is cheaper.</p>
<p>Most baby powder nowadays *is* corn starch. Mineral talc was found to be dangerous to babies. So the only difference is price and scent. Usually the foodstuff version is cheaper.</p>
<p>I have a wooden object that I want to duplicate in a different material .. possibly HDPE. can I use saran warp to keep the Oogoo from sticking to the wood so that I can make a mould? </p>
<p>Is this Oogoo UV stable? I'm want to repair my van's deteriorating window seal which will be in the sun and weather.</p>
Sugru SHELVING brackets hold weight; I'm wondering if anyone has experience with Oogoo to hold a SHELF?
<p>Hey, does anybody know if I could remove this? Real sugru apparently comes off if you need it to, and I'm planning to attach some sugroo/oogroo to my locker, but it can't be permanent. Does anybody know?</p>
<p>i do not know. but try this on a piece of metal then try different ways of taking it off.</p><p>For hot-melt-glue i use rubbing alcohol (RA) and tweezers. i close the tweezers then dip the point in the RA, then press the tip where the glue meets the metal. the RA then flows between the glue and the metal, separating the two.</p>
<p>will this work for casting aluminium? if no, could it stand lead?</p>
<p>use the lost wax method. <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lost-wax_casting" rel="nofollow"> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lost-wax_casting</a></p><p><a href="http://www.onlinemetals.com/meltpt.cfm" rel="nofollow">http://www.onlinemetals.com/meltpt.cfm</a></p>
<p>Dear Mikey77 and all of the helpful commenters here, thank you! This stuff is the bomb! My husband and I have been using it for 4+ years to make relief sculpture molds for our costumes. Over that time we've refined the method specifically for this purpose. Many artists ask us how we do it , so we just made a pdf booklet called &quot;Oogoo for artists&quot;. Check it out here</p><p><a href="http://organicarmorarts.com/product/oogoo-for-artists-book/" rel="nofollow">http://organicarmorarts.com/product/oogoo-for-arti...</a></p>
<p>I cannot express how amazingly wonderful this is without falling back on expletives. So just let me say from the bottom of my impoverished sculptor's heart, Thank You!</p>
<p>I found out that Zippo lighter fluid is also quite a good thinner for Oogoo, it cures at almost the same speed and I can't find any difference in cured texture. Granted, I didn't use a huge amount, just enough to make it easy to mix and spread. </p>
<p>When this cures, is it very flexible, or does it get rigid?</p>
<p>I wonder how long will it last or if it rots over time, maybe attract ants, roaches or other bugs?</p>
<p>Nope, it does not attract them. Made mine around one year ago, still the same like when it was made. The only thing is that it does not feel powdery anymore, since I use 1 to 1 ratio.</p>
<p>I put the silicone and the starch in a zip lock bag and stir it by kneading the bag until it begins to release from the bag. I can then handle it without it sticking to my hands. Time is short at this point, so I have my project set up already.</p>
it works and its a lot cheaper but it is messier and has some things it cant do but it feels real nice when its dry
it's actually works but it can't quite do all the things sugru can but its a hole lot cheaper!!!
<p>Does anyone know how to make this a little bit harder and more rubber like? More cornstarch or something?</p>
<p>Back in 2010, when Picaxe was still relevant =3</p>
<p>wow!</p>
<p>Wow! Very cool project! I think I will switch over to this. I like Sugru, but it is way too expensive! I see you have done some extensive testing on Oogoo's properties.</p>
<p>I've tried to make my own ooggoo but I think I have some problem.<br>Two days after making the oogoo and it is still sticky.</p><p><br>I used 2:1 silicon:corn starch + 2 drops of color.<br>I have a small flat rectangular left over. I can roll it to a cylinder and it will stay that way until I reopen it.<br>Is this normal?<br>How long does it take for the ooggoo to get to its final stage?</p>
<p>Hey, does anybody know if I could remove this? Real sugru apparently comes off if you need it to, and I'm planning to attach some sugroo/oogroo to my locker, but it can't be permanent. Does anybody know?</p>
<p>Just wanted to add this, since I didn't want to deal with cleaning up measuring spoons, and to make it easier to do any size batch. From my calculations, if you are doing 1 tbs parts, by weight it is 0.729 oz (or 0.73 oz, depending on how far your scale goes) GE Silicone I to 0.28 oz of Corn Starch. I haven't made anything yet, but I'm gearing up to. Thank you for this Instructable!</p>
<p>Great job! Just wondering, is it supposed to be so... Slippery feeling? Or is that because I have to sand it down a little to give more of a rubber feel?</p><p>Also, for anyone wondering, I have used Vaseline as a mold release, and it does prevent the silicone from sticking. All you have to do is use a thick coat of vasilene over the mold, and the silicone (If its what your using) will not stick.</p>
<p>Great stuff. I used it make a rubberized casing for some electronics. </p><p>I found it was pretty sticky to work with while wet, so my hand molding tended to leave the rubberization on the finished product looking pretty lumpy.</p><p>does anyone have any good suggestions for applying an even coating of it on a surface such as a metal housing?</p>
<p>Wow - great post! Thanks! <br>Question: Do you have a feel for how well this would survive over time inside a dishwasher? (I need to do basket repair)</p>

About This Instructable

1,593,071views

4,476favorites

License:

Bio: I believe that the purpose of life is to learn how to do our best and not give in to the weaker way.
More by mikey77:3d Printing: Zizzy-A Robot Assistant 3d Printing Servo Controlled and Other Valves 3D Print A Micro-Light 
Add instructable to: