loading

Step 3: Mixing Oogoo

Mix By Volume
As stated before, Oogoo is simply a mixture of clear silicone caulk and corn starch. It can be mixed anywhere from 5 to 1 to 1 to 2 silicone to corn starch by volume. Up to a point, the more corn starch you add the faster it will set up. I like to mix it in small disposable cups using a Popsicle stick that is wrapped with Gorilla Tape to create a spatula. See pic4. Once it cures the Oogoo peels easily off the tape wrapped stick and the mixing/spreading stick can be reused.

Mix In Small Amounts
A good starting mixture to try out is 1 corn starch to 1 silicone by volume. It is easiest to mix it in small quantities so as to have plenty of time to work it. To see how it works, you could start with 1 tablespoon silicone caulk to 1 tablespoon of corn starch. You can reduce the amount to as little as 1/4 tablespoon corn starch to 1 tablespoon silicone if you want more time to cast it or sculpt it. I rarely mix up more than 3 tablespoons of silicone at a time.

The dry starch and sticky silicone do not want to easily mix. But if you are persistent and keep quickly stirring and mashing the mix, they will eventually merge into a thick paste. The resulting Oogoo is very sticky and will stick to anything that you spread it on. Most things it will stay well glued to. On a few things like some plastics and metals, it will easily peel off after it has cured.

The resulting Oogoo is a nice reflective white but I recommend coloring it so that you can easily see if you have an even mix. See the coloring step.

WARNING: While mixing, Oogoo will give off the strong smell of Acetic acid which can be irritating to the eyes and respiratory system. I strongly recommend that the mixing and forming be done outside or in a VERY WELL VENTILATED room. You should also wear nitrile gloves while mixing as the uncured silicone contains other solvents that might be absorbed by the skin.

One recurrent problem with silicone caulk is that once opened, it will tend to set up in the tube tip. To get a good seal I have had good luck using Gorilla tape wrapped over the tip. See pic4b. If you leave a quarter inch gap between the wrapped tape and the tip you can squeeze out just enough silicone to seal the tip well from air and moisture.


​Will Oogoo have more or less amount of strength as Sugru?
Will this stick to brick outside in Florida?
Most likely.<br>Why don't you try it?
<p>I am curious if this material would be suitable for repairing shoe soles.</p>
<p>The Sugru website recommends putting it on shoe soles, and then texturing it to make non-slip shoes.</p>
<p>J great stuff J just wondering if this stuff<br>is food safe?</p><p>The dentist wanted 120 yoyos for a new set<br>of bruxism guard (night grinding) so I<br>mould my self a set from alginate and cast one from plaster and used sugru to<br>mould which worked very nicely probably better then the first ones I got from<br>the dentist.</p><p>However I learnt that these are not food<br>safe thus I&rsquo;m looking for another material to use.</p><p>It be great if this stuff would work if not<br>can you recommend a material that is?</p>
<p>You can buy non-toxic silicon for aquariums.</p>
<p>Probably too late to be of much use but if you rename this &quot;sports mouth guard&quot; they are under $10 at sporting good stores. Basically the same thing. No medical proffesional involved.</p>
I'm a retired dentist. I used to recommend sports mouth guards regularly. Back then, they were $6 at WalMart.
For the mouth guard, why not get the kind that athletes use? I've seen ones that can be softened in hot water, then when you bite them they take on your custom shape.
They now sell tooth grinding mouth guards at every pharmacy for about $20. It includes a tray and silicone mouth form. You soften it in boiling water then bite down on it for a couple of minutes and you have a custom fitted mouth guard. I've used them on and off for years.
<p>There is a one component food-safe version of silicone caulk. It is still based on the water-curing, acetate-releasing mechanism which this project is using.</p>
<p>I think aquarium sililicone sealant is considered food safe(actually fish safe, but that should be the same)</p>
<p>and that is?</p>
<p>Oogoo is awesome, but if you make it with the regular clear hardware store silicone it is extremely NOT FOOD-SAFE, don't put it in your mouth. You can buy two-part food-safe silicone mold making material, that might work for what you are describing. (Do your homework on that, I'm just suggesting it as a possibility.) When trying to find this sort of information, the first thing you want to check is the msds (safety data sheet (SDS), material safety data sheet (MSDS), product safety data sheet (PSDS) etc.) It's what the hospital uses to figure out how to treat people who put things in their mouths...</p>
<p><a href="http://www.msdssearchengine.com" rel="nofollow">http://www.msdssearchengine.com</a></p>
Can this be used to serve food or water off? How toxic is it?
<p>There is non-toxic silicon available to use for fish tanks.</p>
<p>Hey, does anybody know if I could remove this? Real sugru apparently comes off if you need it to, and I'm planning to attach some sugroo/oogroo to my locker, but it can't be permanent. Does anybody know?</p>
I made a cord snap keeper and the edge of a white IKEA lack shelf. When I was done. It did not come off &quot;easily&quot;<br><br>
<p>I have more trouble keeping it stuck than removing it.</p>
<p>i do not know. but try this on a piece of metal then try different ways of taking it off.</p><p>For hot-melt-glue i use rubbing alcohol (RA) and tweezers. i close the tweezers then dip the point in the RA, then press the tip where the glue meets the metal. the RA then flows between the glue and the metal, separating the two.</p>
I've been looking for a compound that i can use for gap filler on a pair of &quot;frankenboots&quot; i made. The soles dont quite match up with the upper so i need something that can fill in the gaps but, will remail flexible, and that will be water repellant. Has anyone used oogoo for anything comparable?
Based on what I just made, this will be perfect
Sugru SHELVING brackets hold weight; I'm wondering if anyone has experience with Oogoo to hold a SHELF?
<p>I haven't had a lot of success with this stuff sticking. I've tried using it like a rubber shield on several objects (thermos bottles, car keys, keychain lights, etc.) and it always lets go a lot easier than I'd prefer. In the picture is a bumper I made for a battery bank. Those holes are where neodymium magnets were stuck. They held for about a week of use before I started finding them stuck to each other instead of the battery. In this application, it's held onto the plastic case quite well. Not so much, the car key, bottles, etc.</p>
Maybe try embedding he magnets in the material, so the oogoo surrounds them completely , also maybe less cornstarch to silicone willake it stickyer

About This Instructable

1,829,795views

5,415favorites

License:

Bio: I believe that the purpose of life is to learn how to do our best and not give in to the weaker way.
More by mikey77:4D Printing: Make a Collapsible Lantern     3d Printing: Zizzy-A Robot Assistant 3d Printing Servo Controlled and Other Valves 
Add instructable to: