loading

How To Pan Fry the Perfect Steak

Featured
Picture of How To Pan Fry the Perfect Steak
One of my favorite meals to cook for myself is a pan fried steak. Steak is a tricky food to get right, but I have perfected my method for cooking one. This step-by-step instruction will explain in detail how to pan fry a steak for yourself.

This tutorial is for people with prior cooking experience and should not be attempted by anyone who does not feel comfortable in the kitchen. This is a very precise and time sensitive process that could easily turn into a tough, leathery disaster. But this steak is surprisingly easy to prepare as long as you properly prepare and follow each step.
 
Remove these adsRemove these ads by Signing Up

Step 1: Tools and Ingredients

Here is a list of supplies you will need to cook your steak

Tools:

A Stove
One frying pan suitable for the size of your steak
Tongs
a knife
a plate
A clock or timer

Ingredients:

One steak
Olive oil
Butter
Salt
Pepper
Fresh Garlic (or Garlic Powder)



Step 2: Shopping For A Steak

Picture of Shopping For A Steak
The first step is to locate the steak that you wish to cook. I always buy my steak at Tacoma Boys. They have a quality meat selection. It is a bit more expensive, but in my opinion, it is worth it. 

The steak I chose was a 8oz Kobe Petite Sirloin steak. It is small enough for one person and a relatively inexpensive cut of meat. Find a steak that looks tasty to you! If you have the money for a nice New York Steak go for it, but for this tutorial we will be working with a petite sirloin steak.

While you are at the store, make sure you have the rest of your ingredients such as olive oil, butter, salt, pepper, and garlic. A grocery store is a perfect opportunity to pick up some fresh garlic if you prefer that to garlic powder.



1-40 of 102Next »
LivT1 month ago

Turned out super delicious! It was my first time making a steak in the pan. Thank you!!

KatH41 month ago
no2windowl1 month ago
MatthewS301 month ago
Succulent and perfect. Free from bacteria and flavor.
image.jpg
MatthewS301 month ago
I simply took my steak and covered it in salt and pepper, beat it handely and threw it in the microwave for 10 mins. Garnished with a sprig of rosemary and a glass of plastic bottle vodka!
shawn.thomass5 months ago

Half right and half wrong. Salt doesn't burn but pepper does. Rub the salt in THEN let it sit and ... cure (not warm0 . Letting the steak sit for a while allows salt, a natural tenderizer, to do it's job as well as it lets the outsides of the steak to cure or seal which helps keep the juices inside. Searing the sides also helps seal in the juices but only necessary to do this once per side ... constantly flipping the steak every minute will toughen the steak so high heat to sear then turn down to medium and cook till blood comes to the surface on first side and then cook the other side for an equal time to first side. . Another mistake made in this persons ideas was in 'how to pick out a steak' and then they never said how to pick out a steak. Pick out one that is lightly marbled with fat throughout. NOW you have a perfectly cooked steak. One more tip: Be careful trusting these how to posts. They can be created by anybody and rarely are experts.

Heston cooks a steak using this exact same method. By allowing the meat to sit and reach room temperature and flipping every minute gives a stronger sear while allowing the interior to slowly reach its desired temperature. This is the proper way to cook a medium rare steak with the best results and best crust. But it is very work intensive and not used as much by non-michelin star chefs. Also not a good technique if you like your steaks well done. Flipping a steak does not make it tough. Over cooking it will make a steak tough. Also cooking a sub-prime cut quickly will make meat tough or prime cuts slowly. Spot on concerning pepper which will burn at high heats.

I believe this myth was busted. Or was is good eats busted? Either way its just a myth and has no merit.

MateoFish4 months ago

Personally I do it a little different. When I buy a steak I like thicker cuts because they are easier to cook (i.e. easier to avoid overcooking). I buy them at least an inch, sometimes an inch and a half thick. I disagree with warming the steak, I actually do the opposite: I put salt/rub on the steak and then put it in the freezer for up to an hour, or just a few minutes if I'm in a hurry. This is because I love medium rare steaks that are also seared on the outsides to the point that they are almost like an outer crust for the steak. Then, when searing the steak, don't use olive oil, use another oil that has a higher smoke point (I use canola oil, but you can experiment). Olive oil doesn't get hot enough to properly sear a steak, it'll start to smoke if it gets too hot (which isn't good for you, so don't do that). I wait until the pan is about 450 degrees (using a laser thermometer, which is awesome and cheap and you should get one if you're serious). Then I leave for about 5-7 minutes per side depending on how thick the steak is. Then I turn down the stove to medium, and using a steak thermometer (also invaluable), cook the steak until its 145 degrees internally. You should try and cook evenly on both sides or else the middle won't be even. I try and guess and if I'm good I can get away with only one more turn, but sometimes I'm off and flip the steak a few more times, which is fine. It sounds tough, but if you do it right you'll have a perfectly cooked steak, with a crunchy outer crust and hot pink center. If all this sounds too technical, you can skip everything and just get a steak thermometer, make sure it cooks until 145 on the inside, and you'll have a good steak every time.

ArtC15 months ago

Searing a steak does NOT "seal in" juices. That's been utterly debunked. What it does do is kick-start the Maillard reaction, which is a good thing. Also you DO want a cool or cold piece of meat, not one at room temperature. This allows you to get a good, flavorful char on the outside, without overcooking the interior.

ChrisLF825 months ago
"Wellness"? I know what you mean, but never heard anyone else use that term...
Wow, it was amazing!!!! I followed your instructions, although I changed them a little bit for a healthier way. But I was glad to have a better understanding of how to pan fry a steak thanks to you. I will highly recommend anyone to try it. I enjoyed the steak chased with a Ginness Blonde American Lager (you should try this beer, it was awesome too). Keep posting!!!
Softneck5 months ago

First time i tried to Pan Fry a steak and it did NOT work out as planned, see i usually cook naked and did not expect all the splattering of the juices and grease. It had burnt me below the belt BAD!! When i went to the hospital they explained to me that I will be fine, BUT apparently have a different problem called "micro-penis syndrome" I was not pleased to find out how small my penis really is. Very embarrasing, but steak came out great.

ArtC15 months ago

Searing has nothing to do with moisture, and everything to do with kick-starting the

Maillard reaction. By all means, do it.

This was amazing to say the least

RobertaA5 months ago

I can't believe I have never pan fried a steak! Only grilled or broiled. This was delicious. The taste makes up for all the splatter, lol. Thank you for posting this.

sassayone6 months ago
First time pan-frying, so delicious!!! Thanks for sharing.
Toniluv6 months ago
MY BEST STEAK EVER! THANKS A BUNCH:)

I like the drinking beer part the best.

I am 67 yrs old. never knew how to cook a good steak. I thank U very much for the instructions. I have never bought a good piece of meat and this Xmas I did. I did now want to mess it up. Again thanks.

One is never to old to learn! Cute dog you have.

I am 67 yrs old. never knew how to cook a good steak. I thank U very much for the instructions. I have never bought a good piece of meat and this Xmas I did. I did now want to mess it up. Again thanks.

I am 67 yrs old. never knew how to cook a good steak. I thank U very much for the instructions. I have never bought a good piece of meat and this Xmas I did. I did now want to mess it up. Again thanks.

I am 67 yrs old. never knew how to cook a good steak. I thank U very much for the instructions. I have never bought a good piece of meat and this Xmas I did. I did now want to mess it up. Again thanks.

I am 67 yrs old. never knew how to cook a good steak. I thank U very much for the instructions. I have never bought a good piece of meat and this Xmas I did. I did now want to mess it up. Again thanks.

I am 67 yrs old. never knew how to cook a good steak. I thank U very much for the instructions. I have never bought a good piece of meat and this Xmas I did. I did now want to mess it up. Again thanks.

I am 67 yrs old. never knew how to cook a good steak. I thank U very much for the instructions. I have never bought a good piece of meat and this Xmas I did. I did now want to mess it up. Again thanks.

I am 67 yrs old. never knew how to cook a good steak. I thank U very much for the instructions. I have never bought a good piece of meat and this Xmas I did. I did now want to mess it up. Again thanks.

I am 67 yrs old. never knew how to cook a good steak. I thank U very much for the instructions. I have never bought a good piece of meat and this Xmas I did. I did now want to mess it up. Again thanks.

I am 67 yrs old. never knew how to cook a good steak. I thank U very much for the instructions. I have never bought a good piece of meat and this Xmas I did. I did now want to mess it up. Again thanks.

BennettG made it!7 months ago

Fantastic!

image.jpeg
BennettG made it!7 months ago

Fantastic!

image.jpeg
Warndog218 months ago

Of age be damned. If you can cook a steak good enough for me you've earned that beer at any age!

wildjackal8 months ago

I read your method, Martha Stewart's, then I came back to yours because it was better. And that's not nothin. I follow your procedure for searing, but once I finished searing it, I moved it to the oven broiled it to finish. Great flavor. Thanks.

neffk1 year ago

Nice work. I'll have to try the petite sirloin. So far, eye of round is my favorite cut. It's not too expensive and it can be cut into nice uniform steaks.

BTW, you are NOT sealing in juices. That's a myth that's over 100 years old. I've heard it many times myself but it makes no sense. If the juices were sealed in, why is it sizzling? You should sear the meat so it tastes delicious.

olrob neffk1 year ago

My selection of a good inexpensive steak is to pick one (e.g. from Stop&Shop) that sells for over $11.00 a pound and whose price is marked down to over half the original price. It has been aging(?) for a few days before the meat manager reduces the price. I bring it home and put it in the back of the freezer. I must have over 10 in the freezer now. They are arranged so the oldest is in the front. When I want to cook steaks, I select the oldest and put them/it in my warming oven (an area in the fireplace containing 2 heating lamps) with one or both lamps on until they feel defrosted. I then let them sit in the open for a time before I start cooking. I have had some that look "freezer burned" but they cooked fine and tasted great.

gsloan olrob8 months ago
If you get freezer burn, I learned about a trick and tried it on some ribeye that I had with freezer burn...
Take frozen beef steak and unwrap ... then using Cool Whipped topping layer some on a large enough flat plate or tray. Lay the steak onto this layer of topping and then cover the entire steak with a thick coating and let the steak thaw at room temp if you are planning to cook within a few hours or refrigerate if you plan on another day. To cook remove steak from your tray with tongs and place it on a hot grille and cook asmyou normally would. The topping will just melt off and offers a slightly sweet flavor to the steak. My theory is that it somehow absorbs into the burned area in the steak. But it works and I didnt believe it would, and my wife absolutely hates freezer burn and usually would not even continue eating a freezer burn steak if I was being cheap and trying to sneek one by her tastebuds. I told her what I was doing and I just asked her to taste it. It was even acceptable to her.
wb6mri1 year ago

This sounds pretty good with one exception I grew up in a family of chefs (for real one was one of Patton's) all old world/country trained as was I. Here is my issue with the method. once you sear the steak, roast, or any uncoated meat sear it in your olive oil/butter that is smoking turn over now leaveit in the pan or throw it under the broiler pull it out after checking with a meat thermometer flip over finish off basting the meat then pull it out place on a plate for 5-10 minutes cut away.

The other thing I was never allower to cook anything in anything other than good old fashioned "Lodge" or "Griswald" cast iron. You can cook in anything you want but good black cast iron even if you buy it second or third hand rusty and all will last you till you die. I have a chicken fryer that I bought 10 years ago from a grand mother of a friend who had it for 30 years before me and still great.

I hope this is helpful to a few people. And if anyone wants some cast iron recipes let me know and I'll do a cast iron recipe Instructable.

gsloan wb6mri8 months ago
I would like to see a collection of the cast iron recipes.... i have a great collection of old and varied sizes from 24" down to 6" and most all are old except the big ones are older Lodge and I say older to mean 1980 or before that a little. I used them a lot for campfire cooking.
gsloan wb6mri8 months ago
Great looking steak.... i prefer grilled an smoked over charcoal..
1-40 of 102Next »