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How to Bake a Fresh Pumpkin (for pie, etc)

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Step 2: Baking and Waiting

Picture of Baking and Waiting
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Next you'll actually bake the pumpkin halves.

Line a large pan with the tin-foil. This is kinda optional, but it saves a lot of time in clean up since the juices will run out and burn during baking. Because of the juices, you'll want to use a pan that has edges to it, not just a flat cookie sheet.

Lay your pumpkin halves face down on the pan.

Set the oven to around 350 degrees, or around 180 Celsius.

Stick the pan in the oven, and then wait for about an hour and a half to 2 hours. The actual time will vary depending on how thick your pumpkins are and how hot your oven actually gets.

You can check the pumpkins every so often to see if they are tender by sticking a fork in them.
Once they're nice and soft that means they're done.
 
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peg.morin.93 months ago

Beautiful seeds! Bake the rinds with butter, salt, brown sugar. Feed the worm farm the core top and bottom and stringy stuff (they'll be in heaven)! Plant the seeds in small brown feeder cups in the indoors pre-spring tip past the last frost and them put them in the fresh tilled bed, and you'll have your own family pumpkin farm next October. For winter planting I have discovered leeks, scallions, and artichokes are quite hardy plants through this season! Small rectangle planter boxes are great for the leeks and scallion, little and big soldiers in a row! I am experimenting with the artichoke in a half-barrel, seems to like it, it's alive and well. If you have the room you should consider a bee hive and chicken coop yourself, Organic, self sustained, small farms, is the biggest and most important thing that humankind can be doing right now. Good luck to us all!

DSCF4019.JPG
peg.morin.93 months ago

Beautiful seeds! Bake the rinds with butter, salt, brown sugar. Feed the worm farm the core top and bottom and stringy stuff (they'll be in heaven)! Plant the seeds in small brown feeder cups in the indoors pre-spring tip past the last frost and them put them in the fresh tilled bed, and you'll have your own family pumpkin farm next October. For winter planting I have discovered leeks, scallions, and artichokes are quite hardy plants through this season! Small rectangle planter boxes are great for the leeks and scallion, little and big soldiers in a row! I am experimenting with the artichoke in a half-barrel, seems to like it, it's alive and well. If you have the room you should consider a bee hive and chicken coop yourself, Organic, self sustained, small farms, is the biggest and most important thing that humankind can be doing right now. Good luck to us all!

DSCF4019.JPG
peg.morin.93 months ago

(I have cut mine into 5 large chunks). DON'T THROW THE SEEDS AWAY! THAT'S SILLY, at the least. This is my Plan: I will plant the seeds just pre-spring in the house until the last frost and put them in the large raised bed. I have half wine barrels for tomatoes and peppers and artichoke inside the bed perimeter. The top and bottom core and orange string I have saved for the small worm farm I maintain (to my own delight) in our garage. I have big but quite modest plans for this next spring/summer. I am going to plant only melons and pumpkin in the large and deep organic raised bed (kitchen garden) 30 feet from my back kitchen door. This bed also houses two of three of my peach White Blood Peach Trees. I also hope to build a good size chicken cope and maintain 1 hive of bees. My neighbor Becky is allergic to bees so she has to sign off on this before I get me self a queen (which right now is the ordering time for the Queen Bee to be posted out to you come February.) I have 3 different types of Japanese Myrtle, a large trunked green Myrtle; near the kitchen sink window is the finer trunked red Myrtle; and lastly, an Upside-dowl bowl shaped Green Myrtle bush. Bees love these trees and in the summer they are in a steady hum state of activity that is an incredibly lovely summer sound. I have noticed a dramatic decline in this bee population over the past few years. I want to mitigate that with a hopefully GMO hive of my own. There are neighbors, one in particular, I mean that is obvious, and well cared for, who plant pot/Marijuana plants and I'm quite sure they are scripted. Anyway, I think my bees will like being over there too. My area is low mountain, Pine, Spruce, Oak, low count but some deer, hotter than hell summers and wet cold winters, only a little snow here but am surrounded by three dormant volcanic mountains, ( Shasta, Trinity Alps, Lassen) North of the Madre's on the Pacific Crest Trail. If you want to get of sense of this terrain in an excellent book i highly recommend Wild by Cheryl Strayed (And they just made it a movie with Reese Witherspoon, I can't wait to go see it!!!) peace out friends! Feel free to Facebook connect with me if you too are into gardening, survival prep, liberal spiritual thinker!

tqwerty4 years ago
When I do this I cover the pumpkins with tinfoil as well as line the pan. That way, you don't get the uneven burnt skin which can result in burnt insides and burney taste. It tastes much better that way and more of the juices stay in seeing as it roasts and steams at the same time