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Today, I am germinating orange seeds. I sailed a lot on the internet, so I find as a tree grown from seed can take up to 15 years, so I decided to try to reduce the chronology of its growth in this project, I have covered two phases here ;

1. Faster Germination Method and
2. Re-Potting,

This is a fairly simple process and its a good beginner DIY project. For this I am using a glass bottle, paper towel, tap water, container and soil, generally it went great and I am very happy, I hope you like this project.

Materials Required for Growing Oranges :-

  • Oranges
  • Bottle
  • Paper Towel
  • Water
  • Container or Pot
  • Regular Soil (Compost mix)

Note: - Plastic Container aren’t necessary, but its just help make the process go faster.

Step 1: Choosing, Extracting and Peeling of Seeds.

Get fresh oranges and make sure they full of juice, the best way to find seeds squeeze them and feel good factor after selecting orange, the next process is to extract the seeds, cut the orange in half and choose seeds and try to collect as many as you can, wash the seeds before peeling seeds.

Note:- Peeling seeds can be difficult in the first attempt, I damaged many seeds in peeling. So take time in the process. Slow and steady is the right way.

Step 2: Seeds on Paper Cloth

Now adding all the seeds on paper towels and spray water, not over do it. This can cause the seed to germinate.

Step 3: Bottle Germination Process

Fold gently paper towel and spray water on it, here I am using clean glass bottle for germination. Gently push the paper towel in bottle and sealed with a cork or a piece of wood.

Step 4: Uncapped Bottle After 7 Days

Uncapped bottle after a week and eliminate all seeds from paper towel, also careful about seeds elimination, I lost some seeds in the disposal.

Step 5: Seeds in Container

Add all the seeds in the container, here I am using the plastic container for propagation, adding regular soil mixed with compost, then loosen the soil for seeds, adding seeds and cover with soil and spraying a Little water.

Step 6: Final Look and Getting Good Progress

Here are the images of 1 month progress;

  1. After 3 days it shoots some green buds.
  2. After a week 6 buds grown little.
  3. After 2 weeks it grow little further and
  4. In 3 week it remain same length
  5. After the 4th week a month later it was gone with 2 strong shoots, but it might be fertilizing too much, there leaves getting brown also shoots a new leaves, I hope its a natural process.

I will continue to publish the growth of this plants in the comments section, I hope it will not take too long until the fruit stage. I hope you like this project. Please share your experience with any research on orange plants. Thank you!

<p>I enjoyed going through all. I always planted lemon seeds, but none sprouted. From a horticulture point of view, trees from seeds don't produce quality fruits. </p>
If right planning &amp; caring to plants, anything can be grown from seeds. I disagree , do some biological research seeds can be produce quality fruits.
<p>Will this work with tomato seeds? I tried germinating and then planting some cherry tomato seeds but they never sprouted.</p>
The easiest way to grow tomatoes from seed is to cut one or two in half and expel the gel like liquid into a small container, along with the seeds, of course :) Place this container into a large Ziploc and put in a warm location with Ziploc open for the first day or 2 and seal it after. I like to put mine on top of the fridge. After a few days, check for a layer of fuzzy mold growing on top. The more liquid you started with, the more mold you need to wait for to ensure all seeds get treated with the enzyme that results from the decomposing tomato product. Once you are satisfied with the mold growth, gently clean the seeds in cool or warm, not hot water and either dry for preserving, or go ahead and germinate with your preferred method. If using store bought tomatoes, I always germinate a portion from each batch before preserving to verify the seeds are viable since alot of farmers are growing gmo or sterile plants. Its best risk but an heirloom plant or seed and preserve seeds from these for future use!
You can try this but it's very hard to remove tomato seeds protective layer, you can simply cut tomatoes and lay the slices on top of the soil. The sun does all the work and the seeds fall through the slice and grow up through the rotting tomato slice, almost acting like its own self-made compost in the early stages of growing. I hope this will work, let me know if you trying another attempt.
<p>Great guide, thank you. I have successfully germinated lemon, grapefruit and lime seeds in the pat (many years ago) despite living in the middle of the UK. I just let my seeds dry out and then planted them in my own home made compost/fertiliser. Sadly I did not know how to properly care for them back then and they died after 12 months :( You mention this method of slicing tomatoes and just laying them on the soil. I've seen first hand nature growing this same way. It happens where people discard a half eaten (for example) cheese and tomato sandwich. As long as local wildlife does not get to the tasty treat the sandwich will degrade leaving the sliced tomato to do its stuff and the seeds germinate and produce new plants. They are quite successful at producing new tomatoes this way.</p>
<p>Let one go over-ripe on the vine, then let it decompose in a small amount of water, eventually washing out the seeds....<br>http://permaculturenews.org/2014/07/08/save-tomato-seeds/</p>
Yes, I have made orange wine also. It is delicious. I cannot imagine grapefruit wine though. The process is very simple and available online and in books. We have specialized stores here that sell all the supplies. Other fruit works just as well.
<p>Did this decades ago when I was in high school. We live in Florida, so that was a big advantage. We planted the seeds and when they sprouted, kept transplanting into larger containers as needed. At about 2-3 years, we set one out in the back yard. This was a grapefruit, and we had fruit on that tree for about 30 years. It finally died a while back, but my Mom froze the juice and had it year round. We were lucky and did not have to use a graft to get good fruit, but that is something to definitely consider when trying this. Grafting one or more varieties of orange onto a stock has been done with success also. </p>
@CaitD1 Good to hear that I revived your good memories, also how you froze juice for a year long consumption ?
To juice oranges and grapefruit for freezing, just juice with a regular juicer and pour the juice into sterilized glass containers. Be sure to leave room for expansion caused by the freezing before capping and just put in the freezer. Thaw in refrigerator as needed. If your juice is a bit sour, you can also add a bit of sugar to taste. With the grapefruit, we did not do that.
@CaitD1 thanks, well that's the normal, I thought you preserving like wines. :)
<p>I've grown tons of oranges directly in soil (usually put them in <br>another potted plant and re-pot later), but they never get more than <br>some 10cm tall... It's like they just stop growing taller, even though <br>they seem to thrive and have a big enough pot</p>
well you can follow this instructible, I'm posting updates on regular intervals.
<p>Are these gonna be small like bonsai?</p>
<p>Only if you treat them like Bonsai, i.e. trimming the roots etc. Could be fun to do that too. </p>
@eileenlilley ​bonsai is for decorations, I'm going to grow as a huge tree and harvest before 15 years. That's the whole objective of this project.
Yeah, if you try and it works out, that would be great if you make an intractable on that.
<p>@mrcheatak No</p>
To help grow a nice strong healthy tree it is a beneficial to pick all fruit as soon as you see it ,not letting it ripen. This lets the tree put down strong roots and leads to better harvests in the future.
<p>On most fruit trees you should should pick off the fruit the first year. This is mainly to keep the heavy fruit from breaking the tender branches which are not strong enough to hold the weight. Even after the tree is strong enough to support the fruit, you need to cull out the fruit to where they are no more than a hand's-width apart. At least that's the rule for peaches and probably holds true for most fruit trees. This allows the tree to give more resources to fewer fruits which makes them bigger and better. </p>
@caruncles Okay surely I will try, also I'm going to re shaping the oranges in star and square shaped by Japanese trick.
Hmm, after years of waiting that's pretty sacrificial effort not letting it ripen. Thanks to your suggestion. If both of my plants survived till fruit stage i will do with one of them.
<p>I have a neighbor with an lemon tree and she likes to create seedlings to give away. Her method.... cut a lemon in half... and bury each one.. she is very successful at creating lemon plants... ;O)</p>
@rgalka hmm that's great, I saw this method in tomatoes. Thanks for this info.
<p> This a good fun project, but be aware that citrus trees are usually composed of root stock with scions grafted on them to make a healthy plant that is true to the parent plant.</p><p> Also, you never know what the fruit will be like when it eventually does bear. Random genetic experiments like this seldom produce fruit as good as the fruit it came from.</p><p> If I was going to commit time, space and energy to a fruit tree, I would decide what I want and buy a grafted seedling from a reliable source. </p>
<p>Yes at the right time will come, I will use the grafting technique in one of my plant and another plant will grow wild.</p>
<p>Why would you think this is a good grafting stock? Or top scion? Let us know how the experiment comes out?</p>
<p>well I don't know its a good parent stock or not but it survived in 30 seeds in the process of germination, so I believe this is it, these small plants gives me fruit one day, if all goes well. Sure, I will keep posting the progress here.</p>
@sharpsick Indeed, in my country (Spain) planting citrus trees from seed is forbidden for farmers, since citrus diseases can spread if not using the right root stock.
<p>Thanks I shall try this, although its too cold here to grow outside here, it would be nice to have on the window sill.</p>
<p>Nice project. But does it need warmer enviroment than room temperature or is room temperature good enough? </p>
Well I planted on my rooftop in bigger pot and trust me he got hell of a sunlight.
Fantastic ! I am going to try this . Thank you for sharing !
Thanks !
Pretty good my freind, a little off on your Grammar but that's perfectly understandable. I like it though, you can also do this with limes, lemons, any citrus fruit really. Right now I'm doing it with kiwis. thanks, getysburg <br>
<p>Thanks! <br>I will try to improve in next instructible. Also, I love to see your kiwi germination, I tried in winters but I failed to propagate. </p>
Yeah I've been thinking about making an instructibles, but I want to wait until I have the plants a little bigger you know? But I'll probably start a new batch of seeds germinating so I can show the plants side by side.
Very interesting, I can't wait to try this m&eacute;thod. And very good pictures, good idea to keep the oranges in the field of your pictures. <br>
Thanks dear, appreciation brings more ibles. That's only thing I want here.

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