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The title tells it all.Please note that I did not write this myself ,I just got it off another site so that other people can reach it.Here is the original page

Step 1: Materials

Not pictured:Tubing
Not Pictured:Syrup
pic1:your carbonator
pic2:coke connector
pic3:pepsi+everyone else connector
pic4:co2
pic5:syrup pump (flojet)
pic6:selector valve(optional)
pic7:valve pack


The person who actually wrote this said you can get most of these at eBay.

Step 2: Cleaning Used Gear

Pump:Wash with soapy water and a good degreasing agent
Ice bin:Contact manufacturer for instructions.
Carbonator:Remove sensor and wash tank. DO NOT DUNK OR SPRAY!let it airdry btw the sensor is thar red thing
fountain heads:remove label and wash behind it be sure to remove any spray

Step 3: Installing the Damn Tank

Take your double regulator (or primary regulator if you have two) to the local welding supply place when you get your CO2 tank. They should be able to give you the proper fittings and reducers to connect your regulator's primary port to the tank itself. His local shop went so far as to connect & test it for him.

The wall behind the tank is a mirror, so don't get confused ;) Before putting the tank in its place, be sure to put two eye-bolts into the wall on either side of where the tank will sit. Then, use a small length of chain and some fastener hooks or clips. Secure the tank to the wall tight enough that, no matter how you tip it, its center of gravity will cause it to stand back upright. The idea is that if anything knocks or hits the tank, it won't fall over and bust its tap, causing the tank to become a rocket (which is a very bad thing, and could cause injury/death.) If you need help with what is considered an appropriate fastening system, ask the welding people. As you can see in the picture below, that tank isn't going anywhere.

A word on regulators; they pass the "primary" pressure, usually hundreds or thousands of psi, through their primary ports. They also "tap" that primary pressure to send a lower amount of pressure to their secondary ports.The gas exits the cylinder at way too high of a pressure; the regulator taps that high pressure to provide the lower pressure we need AND also passes the high pressure on to the other primary port. In a dual-regulator situation as shown in the picture (which is really just two regulators connected together with a threaded fitting), the high pressure gas (red) enters on the right-primary port of the first regulator. It is tapped to provide 100 psi to the carbonator feed (blue). BUT that high-pressure gas also simultaneously passes out the other primary port to the second regulator. That regulator taps the high-pressure feed to provide the syrup pumps with gas (55 psi). Finally, the high-pressure gas exits the primary port on the far left to hit the pressure gauge to give us a tank reading.

If you are unclear as to how regulators work, TALK to the people at the welding supply place. Admit up front that you don't know much about CO2 gas or regulators, and ask them for info. Also, look at your regulators. They will typically list on the back which are the primary and which are the secondary ports.

If you are going to setup a system with two single regulators, what you do is split the output of the first regulator with a brass T barb, then send one side to the carbonator, and the other to the second regulator, which steps the gas down yet again to the pressure needed by the syrup pumps. DO NOT use the primary pressure. The gas exiting the tank will burst the hose.The carbonator input pressure should be 95 to 100 PSI.

For syrup kegs, the pressure should be about 30 PSI.

I have had conflicting reports about syrup pumps, however I looked at the system my local Pizza Hut was using and they run their syrup pumps at slightly less than 60 PSI, so that is the figure I am going to go with. Update: after getting my system working, I found that my pumps worked best at 55 psi. Whatever you do, look at the labels on the syrup pumps; they will list a maximum pressure. NEVER exceed this pressure.



When you are ready, turn the screws (or handles) on your regulators to cut the pressure off completely (the regulator will have it printed on the unit which direction decreases the pressure). Once you have the regulators set to OFF, slowly turn on the CO2 cylinder's main output. You should see the high pressure gauge show a reading of hundreds of psi. You can use a solution of soapy water to check for leaks. Or, turn the handle off again and let it sit overnight. If the regulators are truly shut off, the pressure gauge for the main tank should show the same reading in the morning as it did the day before. If it has moved visibly, then you have a small leak somewhere. This leak could drain your system of CO2 rather quickly over a period of days.

When you connect your lower pressure gas lines, be sure to test those with soapy water as well. Nothing will be more annoying than getting everything setup and going and coming back the next day to find that all of your CO2 has leaked out.

Step 4: Syrup Pumps

The syrup pumps will take a lot of time, simply because you need one for each flavor of drink that you will have. Find a piece of plywood or a long board and mount the pumps to that board. Then, mount the board to the wall. Trust me, it is a LOT easier that way.

One you have all the pumps mounted to the board, but before you put the board on the wall, take the time to hook up the gas lines between each of the pumps. If you don't already have them, you will need a number of brass barbed T junctions, and the worm clamps to attach them. You can also use plastic barbs (which are usually rated for 125 psi or more), or stainless steel ones (my syrup pumps came with these, so I used them).

This isn't a very good picture, but you get the idea. For some reason, my set of six pumps included five Flojet pumps and one Shurflo pump (pictured center.) At any rate, you can see the gas line (entering from the left side, lower bit of tubing.) It makes its way through each of the T junctions to the next, and also to the syrup pumps themselves.

Once that is done, mount the board on the wall. You do not need to have the pumps below the syrup, as they will "suck" on the bag.

Step 5: Hook the Pumps to the Fountain

Next, you need to run the syrup feed lines to the fountain. Be aware that a few flavors, like root beer, will leave any aftertaste in the tubes so you can't ever use them for another beverage; You'd have to replace the tubing for the syrup feed. This tubing is typically 1/4" ID reinforced hose, as the pumped syrup is at a decent pressure.

Last step is to run the syrup source lines. This is typically slightly larger 3/8" tube. Put the correct bag-in-box style connector for that flavor on one end, and connect the other to the syrup pump. This is a very low pressure connection, and can use standard non-reinforced tubing. I would recommend, however, that you use something slightly stout (not the really thin vinyl stuff), because the suction could collapse the hose.

As you can see, the CO2 gas input is marked with an arrow. You can't see it very well, but there is a blue spout that is the CO2 exit. If you want to vent the CO2 outside your house for some reason, you would connect all the blue vent ports together and run that line to the outside.

The larger product "in" hose is shown top, and the slightly smaller output hose is also indicated. You can also see the black tabs that can be slid out to remove the fitting completely. Watch out for the rubber O-rings! Without them, you won't get a good seal.

Here, you can see that I have hooked up the six syrup pumps to the back of the unit. Notice that one in the middle isn't hooked up - now is a really good time to be VERY familiar with the diagram on the back of your unit:

If your unit doesn't have one, contact the manufacturer and get the manual, or check their website. You definitely want to have this information. Pay attention to the cold plate (rectangular block at the bottom of the diagram that everything passes through.) As you can see, starting from the left, we have syrup 1-3, an "open" connector, syrup 4-6, plain water x2, and soda water x2**. Be sure to follow this layout correctly. I suggest labeling all your hoses, syrup pumps, etc so you don't get confused and hook the wrong thing up somewhere.

** Plain water vs carbonated water: Most of the time, what they really mean is "shared lines vs direct lines". The "carbonated water" inputs both feed a "common" tube that connects to all the fountain heads except for the ones that have direct lines (plain water). The labels have nothing to do with whether or not you use carbonated vs non-carbonated drinks in each line. You can very well hook up carbonated water to all four and use only carbonated beverages. Or you could hook up carbonated water to the soda water inputs, and to one of the plain water inputs, yielding five soda water heads. Then put plain water on the second plain water input, and hook up pink lemonade or orange juice to the sixth head.

Notice in the enhanced diagram what is happening. The blue lines are the ones on the back of the unit marked "CO2 water" or "soda water". They are feeding fountain heads (valves) 1, 2, 3, and 6. However heads 4 & 5 are NOT connected to these inputs at all. They have direct lines to the rear connections, marked as "plain water 1" and "plain water 2".

Step 6: Install Carbonator,the Heart

Next, you need to run the syrup feed lines to the fountain. Be aware that a few flavors, like root beer, will leave any aftertaste in the tubes so you can't ever use them for another beverage; You'd have to replace the tubing for the syrup feed. This tubing is typically 1/4" ID reinforced hose, as the pumped syrup is at a decent pressure.

Last step is to run the syrup source lines. This is typically slightly larger 3/8" tube. Put the correct bag-in-box style connector for that flavor on one end, and connect the other to the syrup pump. This is a very low pressure connection, and can use standard non-reinforced tubing. I would recommend, however, that you use something slightly stout (not the really thin vinyl stuff), because the suction could collapse the hose.

See this picture:

As you can see, the CO2 gas input is marked with an arrow. You can't see it very well, but there is a blue spout that is the CO2 exit. If you want to vent the CO2 outside your house for some reason, you would connect all the blue vent ports together and run that line to the outside.

The larger product "in" hose is shown top, and the slightly smaller output hose is also indicated. You can also see the black tabs that can be slid out to remove the fitting completely. Watch out for the rubber O-rings! Without them, you won't get a good seal.

Here, you can see that I have hooked up the six syrup pumps to the back of the unit. Notice that one in the middle isn't hooked up - now is a really good time to be VERY familiar with the diagram on the back of your unit:

If your unit doesn't have one, contact the manufacturer and get the manual, or check their website. You definitely want to have this information. Pay attention to the cold plate (rectangular block at the bottom of the diagram that everything passes through.) As you can see, starting from the left, we have syrup 1-3, an "open" connector, syrup 4-6, plain water x2, and soda water x2**. Be sure to follow this layout correctly. I suggest labeling all your hoses, syrup pumps, etc so you don't get confused and hook the wrong thing up somewhere.

** Plain water vs carbonated water: Most of the time, what they really mean is "shared lines vs direct lines". The "carbonated water" inputs both feed a "common" tube that connects to all the fountain heads except for the ones that have direct lines (plain water). The labels have nothing to do with whether or not you use carbonated vs non-carbonated drinks in each line. You can very well hook up carbonated water to all four and use only carbonated beverages. Or you could hook up carbonated water to the soda water inputs, and to one of the plain water inputs, yielding five soda water heads. Then put plain water on the second plain water input, and hook up pink lemonade or orange juice to the sixth head.

Notice in this enhanced diagram what is happening. The blue lines are the ones on the back of the unit marked "CO2 water" or "soda water". They are feeding fountain heads (valves) 1, 2, 3, and 6. However heads 4 & 5 are NOT connected to these inputs at all. They have direct lines to the rear connections, marked as "plain water 1" and "plain water 2".

Step 7: Drainage

Next, you need to run the syrup feed lines to the fountain. Be aware that a few flavors, like root beer, will leave any aftertaste in the tubes so you can't ever use them for another beverage; You'd have to replace the tubing for the syrup feed. This tubing is typically 1/4" ID reinforced hose, as the pumped syrup is at a decent pressure.

Last step is to run the syrup source lines. This is typically slightly larger 3/8" tube. Put the correct bag-in-box style connector for that flavor on one end, and connect the other to the syrup pump. This is a very low pressure connection, and can use standard non-reinforced tubing. I would recommend, however, that you use something slightly stout (not the really thin vinyl stuff), because the suction could collapse the hose.

See this picture:

As you can see, the CO2 gas input is marked with an arrow. You can't see it very well, but there is a blue spout that is the CO2 exit. If you want to vent the CO2 outside your house for some reason, you would connect all the blue vent ports together and run that line to the outside.

The larger product "in" hose is shown top, and the slightly smaller output hose is also indicated. You can also see the black tabs that can be slid out to remove the fitting completely. Watch out for the rubber O-rings! Without them, you won't get a good seal.

Here, you can see that I have hooked up the six syrup pumps to the back of the unit. Notice that one in the middle isn't hooked up - now is a really good time to be VERY familiar with the diagram on the back of your unit:

If your unit doesn't have one, contact the manufacturer and get the manual, or check their website. You definitely want to have this information. Pay attention to the cold plate (rectangular block at the bottom of the diagram that everything passes through.) As you can see, starting from the left, we have syrup 1-3, an "open" connector, syrup 4-6, plain water x2, and soda water x2**. Be sure to follow this layout correctly. I suggest labeling all your hoses, syrup pumps, etc so you don't get confused and hook the wrong thing up somewhere.

** Plain water vs carbonated water: Most of the time, what they really mean is "shared lines vs direct lines". The "carbonated water" inputs both feed a "common" tube that connects to all the fountain heads except for the ones that have direct lines (plain water). The labels have nothing to do with whether or not you use carbonated vs non-carbonated drinks in each line. You can very well hook up carbonated water to all four and use only carbonated beverages. Or you could hook up carbonated water to the soda water inputs, and to one of the plain water inputs, yielding five soda water heads. Then put plain water on the second plain water input, and hook up pink lemonade or orange juice to the sixth head.

Notice in this enhanced diagram what is happening. The blue lines are the ones on the back of the unit marked "CO2 water" or "soda water". They are feeding fountain heads (valves) 1, 2, 3, and 6. However heads 4 & 5 are NOT connected to these inputs at all. They have direct lines to the rear connections, marked as "plain water 1" and "plain water 2".

Step 8: Bringing It All Together

At this point you should have completed these tasks:

  • Installed CO2 tank and regulator
  • Mounted syrup pumps
  • Placed carbonator and connected to fresh water supply
  • Run your CO2 hoses to connect one regulator to the carbonator and the other to the syrup pumps
  • Connected the syrup pumps to the dispenser
  • Connected the soda water feeds to the dispenser
  • Put the proper bag-in-box connectors on the syrup feed hoses, and connected them to the syrup pumps

First, follow the carbonator startup procedure if you haven't already: Turn on the fresh water, leaving the pressure release valve open to allow air to escape. (you will hear noise). When water comes out, close the valve. Turn on the CO2 and set the regulator for 100 psi. Plug in the carbonator. Vend plain soda water out of one of the other fountain heads until you get a nice fizz. This will probably take a couple of gallons of water to get it going right.

Now add ice to the ice bin (enough to cover the cold plate), and wait 15 minutes before attempting to vend soda. While you are waiting for the ice to cool everything down, work on the syrup pumps. Nothing will work right if the carbonated water isn't cold when vended, because it will lose its carbonation almost immediately.

For my particular dispenser, ten 8lb. bags of ice filled up the ice bin about half way.

As you start turning up the regulator for the syrup pumps, they will all start pumping immediately, and won't stop until they have pressurized the line between them and the dispenser! If you have enough bag-in-box units, hook them all up to a syrup pump. Turn the pressure on until it reads about 50 psi to start with. All hell is going to break loose. Don't worry. Start with the first pump. (It is easiest if you have a helper for this.) Have your helper vend out of the soda head connected to that syrup pump. You should see it start to suck syrup and send it to the fountain. When you see that the 1/4" feed line to the fountain coming from the pump is full of syrup, have your helper stop vending soda. (It helps to have a bucket nearby that they can dump the glasses into). You may need to massage the line a bit, or even hold the box of syrup above the pump at first to help it get going.

Now move on to the next pump, and the next, and so on until they have all stopped pumping. They make a "woosh-click-woosh-click" noise when they are operating. If you are having trouble getting a specific pump to operate, but it is making the "woosh-click-woosh-click" noise, then take the BIB connector off the end of the hose. Take a glass of water and pour it into the hose, while holding the hose above the syrup pump. While your assistant vends from that line, hold the hose up in the air while keeping the end dunked into your glass of water. The pump should be able to get started with the water, and you can reattach your connector.

Ultimately, if you have a pump that just won't do anything (just sits there hissing as the gas escapes), turn the gas off then disconnect it from the system and bypass that pump. (You can use a barbed splice piece to make this easy.) The pump may be defective. You can try disassembling it and cleaning it, but I have never done so myself.

As with everything in the soda system, the syrup pumps operate based on pressure. They will continue to pump until they have pressurized the line between the fountain head and the output fitting. As soda is vended, the line gets depressurized, and the pump will trigger into action for one cycle, causing the line to be pressurized again, and so on. That's why as you vend soda, the pumps will make a "woosh-click" cycle every few seconds.

Don't get frustrated now! Just keep working at it.

Throughout all this process you may have found a fountain head that doesn't work, a busted syrup pump, etc. Try to combine all the defective items into a single line. Then, you can simply use five flavors instead of six (assuming a six-head unit). You can do this permanently, or until the new parts you need arrive.

Now you will need to make sure to vend enough soda from each fountain head to full clear out both the soda line and the syrup line feeding that head. It is better safe than sorry here - a bag has a LOT of syrup in it, the tank has plenty of CO2, and you aren't going to run out of fresh water.

When you are feeling confident, take a small taste and see what you think. If the water tastes funny, vend more to flush the system out further. If the drink tastes very sugary, the fountain head may be set too rich. If the drink tastes like mostly soda water, then it may be set too lean. Usually, there are two screws inside the fountain head. The further screw adjusts the water flow rate, and the closer one adjusts the syrup flow rate. Typically, screwing it in further increases the flow, but it should be obvious what does what. You can adjust to your liking to get things started.

To calibrate the fountain heads properly, you will need a brix cup. Update: I have gotten my brix cup and calibrated my fountain. You can see that page here, but don't forget to check out the Final Thoughts page.

Cheers!
This is a great Instructable, but you need to add a main image of the final project to the intro step. Please do that and leave me a message when you have so that we can publish your work. Thanks!
Are you even in the admin team?
There's a bug,I intended to reply to admin.
Oh
Ok done
<p>I just install a new CO2 tank in our property but getting confused with this pump. What's the blue outlet tube for? Because when I open the CO2 tank, the air is coming out from that blue tube and it's so noisy... Is it normal?</p>
<p>The blue port is the exhaust port for the CO2. As the pump opperates and comes up to presure, CO2 will come out the blue port once the lines are primed it should stop and you should only hear it occasionally as syrup is dispensed. If it runs continusly you probably have a problem with the pump</p>
Great Instructable, I think I might do this but with one of the &quot;Wunder Bar&quot; soda guns like the have in the bars. Now that would be awesome!
Just hook it to my vein dude!
But then you can't taste it!<br />
I think i'd rather have the gun thing where all the flavors mix together. Just because it's easier to store the gun.
fantastic. I actually got an entire systems for free today, - took it all apart, and this is exactly the info that I needed to setup my new system. Thanks for compiling this!
Where did u get one of these for free??? You know these systems typically cost like $1000, You are soo lucky!!
"Installing the damn tank" LOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOL
Wow! i didn't know soda fountains worked like that!
Great instruction manual...thanks! I've been working on this for weeks and I'm "getting close" but I'm running into a few little issues. 1st: I have a Pepsi machine and the correct pepsi connector's for BIB (I bought them from Pepsi). I can't figure out how to hook the darn things up to the box. Is there a trick I'm just not getting? Thanks
I can't help you since I did not build one.You can mail the person who originally made these at the website I linked you to.I wish to help you,but I can't.Sorry!

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