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Charoset, חרוסת in Hebrew, is a traditional food eaten by Jews on Passover. It is a part of the seder plate. Charoset represents the bricks that were made by the slaves in the Passover story.

On Passover, Jews all over the world celebrate what it means to be free. Jews think about what it means to them to be freed from slavery. Passover is one of the major Jewish holidays.

Traditionally, charoset is made with apples, cinnamon, walnuts, and wine. This recipe uses grape juice in place of wine. I hope you enjoy!

Step 1: Tools and Materials

To make charoset you need:

  • 2 or 3 apples
  • a small bag of walnuts
  • about 8 oz of grape juice or red wine
  • 2 or 3 tbsp of cinnamin
  • a knife
  • a cutting board
  • a food processor

The grape juice and cinnamon are to taste. The grape juice will make the charoset more liquidy. The choice is yours.

Tip: Using different types of apples can make the charoset taste better! I like to use gala or another sweet apple and a tart apple to add a contrast in flavor.

Step 2: Chop Apples

Using an apple chopper, makes cutting the apples faster. Make sure you throw out the core and the seeds. Chop up both apples.

I ended up only needing two apples to fill the container.

Step 3: Place in Food Processor

After you chop the apples put them in the food processor.

Step 4: Add Other Ingredients

Add in the walnuts and cinnamon.

It is easier to add the grape juice after the rest of the charoset is in the container.

Step 5: Pulse Until Combined

Using the chop setting on the food processor, pulse until all the ingredients are combined. You want the finished product to be fairly fine. About halfway through, you may need to scrap down the sides with a spoon.

Step 6: Pour Charoset Into Container

Pour the charoset into the container. Use a spoon to get it out of the machine.

Step 7: Add Grape Juice

Add in the grape juice. You want the finished product to be smooth, but not soupy.

Step 8: Mix It All Up

Mix all the ingredients together. Add in more grape juice or cinnamon as needed. The finshed product should be brownish with a hint of purple.

Step 9: Enjoy!

Eat your charoset with matzah or plain!



It always tastes better after it sits for a little while.

Step 10: For More Information...

For more information on Passover and the seder plate please see the following:

Passover from the History Channel

Passover Seder

Reform Judaism Passover

Sample Seder for Young Children

There are also a lot of children's books that teach about Passover as well as many different types of Haggadahs. Here are a few of them:

Let My People Go by Tilda Balsley Illustrated by Irene Richard

Penny and the Four Questions by Nancy E. Krulik Illustrated by Marian Young

The Mouse in the Matzah Factory by Francine Medoff Illustrated by Nicole in den Bosch

Passover Around the World byTani Lehman-Wilzig Illustrated by Elizabeth Wolf

The first two videos are from the Maccabeats and are songs/prayers that are sung on Passover. The last video explains the seder plate and what goes on it and is from the Union for Reform Judaism.

<p>Pesach sameach :)</p>

About This Instructable

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Bio: I am a English teacher and future librarian who is interested in finding projects for a future makerspace. I also teach Hebrew School, hence the ... More »
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