Introduction: How to Make Rolling Cornhole Boards

Picture of How to Make Rolling Cornhole Boards

Going to the beach is fun and all, and cornhole makes it even better. However, lugging the boards from your car to the beach can be a pain, so with my dad's help we added a variation to nesting cornhole boards: rolling boards! This Instructable builds upon two of my previous ones:

Nesting cornhole boards: https://www.instructables.com/id/How-to-Make-Nestin...

Standard cornhole boards: https://www.instructables.com/id/How-to-make-Cornho...

To build these boards, you will follow the Nesting cornhole boards Instructable so that both the nesting and standard boards have been constructed, but not yet puttied. Also, the chest pull will be installed in a different location.

Parts

  • 32 1/2" long 5/8" iron rod
  • 5/8 inch ID tubing, ~4 inches
  • 2 hairpin cotters that will fit the 5/8" rod
  • 2 10" pneumatic tires, 5/8" axle size (Harbor Freight SKU 30900 Haul-Master Tire is what I use)

Tools

  • Oil can
  • 5/8" paddle bit
  • 3/4" paddle bit
  • Drill press
  • Small drill bit, diameter slightly larger than hairpin cotter
  • Metal punch
  • Hand drill
  • Tape measure
  • Pencil
  • Awl

Step 1: Making the Axle

Picture of Making the Axle

Use a grinder to cut your 5/8" rod down to 32 1/2" in length. Use the grider to smooth out the edges of the cut so that the wheels will slide on easily.

1/8" from the ends of the rod, use a metal punch to make an indentation for drilling a small hole for the insertion of the hairpin cotter. Insert the hairpin cotter sized drill bit into the drill press. Clamp the rod to your drill press with one of the indentations under the bit. Oil the indentation and slowly drill through the rod, applying oil throughout the drilling process. Repeat this on the other end of the rod and verify fitment of your cotter pin.

Step 2: Making the Axle Holes

Picture of Making the Axle Holes

On the sides of the standard board on the ends opposite the leg attach points, measure 3 1/2" from the end of the board and make a mark. Measure 1 3/4" from the edge of the 2x4 to find the center of the board. Make an indentation at the intersection of the marks with an awl. Nest the boards together and turn them on their side. Hold the boards tightly together and drill with a 5/8" paddle bit, keeping the bit as square to the 2x4 as possible. You will drill through both the standard and the nesting board. Do this on both sides of the boards while nested.

De-nest the boards and use your 3/4" paddle bit to bore out the axle hole ON THE STANDARD BOARD ONLY. Use the 5/8" paddle bit to ream out the hole on the nesting board.

The next part can be a bit frustrating, but patience here will pay off in the long run. Re-nest the boards and attempt to insert the axle. I can almost guarantee it's not going to fit. Un-nest the boards, ream, and re-nest until the axle fits through one side of the set. If the axle doesn't line up at all with the axle hole on the other side, keep reaming. When it starts to line up, on the second axle hole you will be able to see from where wood needs to be removed from the hole, so ream that side. Eventually, after much frustration, cursing, and thrown wrenches, the axle will go all the way through! However, you need to make sure that the axle can slide through fairly easily with minimal twisting and force. It should fit snugly, but shouldn't require a hammer for removal. Use your judgment.

Step 3: Fitting the Wheels

Picture of Fitting the Wheels

I usually finish off the wheels after I am done painting and clear-coating each set, however this step can be done before painting. Personal preference. I do this after painting to verify the axle hole fitment post-painting in case paint gets into the axle holes. If fitment is messed up post-painting, drill the paint out.

Insert the axle into the boards while nested. Measure the axle to make sure even portions are sticking out of each side of the boards. Slide a wheel onto the axle and install one of the hairpin cotters. Hold your 5/8" ID tubing up to the rim of the tire and cut it to fit between the rim and the hairpin cotter. I apply a drop of oil to the tubing for ease of movement. You can also grind the axle down a bit where the tubing goes if it is difficult to take off. Place the tubing on the axle and install the hairpin cotter. Go to the other side of the axle and repeat the process.

Step 4: Finishing the Rolling Set

Picture of Finishing the Rolling Set

Once the boards are painted and clear-coated, you're almost done! Center and install the folding chest pull to the top of the standard board. Install the chest pull so that it will fold toward the ground during play so that it will be out of the way. You can put the spacer board, the standard board's legs, and all of the beanbags into the standard board prior to nesting. Stacking the beanbags may prevent proper nesting, which will prevent axle installation. When you get everything in the right place and place the nesting board into the standard board and achieve nesting perfection, you can now install the axle and wheels!

With the wheels installed, you are ready to roll!

WHEN PROPPING THE BOARDS AGAINST A WALL, CHOCK A WHEEL OR THE BOARDS WILL FALL AND YOU WILL BE VERY, VERY SAD. I speak from experience and a messed up paint job or two.

I hope you enjoyed this Instructable! Let me know if you have any questions or suggestions!

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Bio: I'm a graduate student at Georgia Tech in Electrical Engineering. While at The Citadel for my undergrad degree, I ran a business making cornhole ... More »
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