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Do you hate those blank vacant lots on the side of road and city streets? Have you wanted to put a flower garden in one of those lots but have been afraid of being arrested? Do you not have the money to buy all those flower transplants? Is the lot just to hard to get into? And think of how many times you have seen a bare plot with nothing in it or a neglected flower bed that you just wished you could plant on? Well the seed bomb is just right for you. The seed bomb is cheap compared to buying transplants, is natural and organic, easy to make, pocket sized, and you can easily cover a large area with seed bombs in a very short time. The seed bomb is also a great weapon in the guerrilla gardeners arsenal when the guerrilla gardener needs to quickly get the job done.

Step 1: Materials

All materials in this instructable are cheap or free, easy to find, and are natural and organic.


Clay from your area if available or if clay unavailable in your area you can use crayola air dry clay and is found in walmart for about $5.00 (used to protect the seeds from insects, birds, etc. that might eat them)
Water (For forming clay, do not water seed bomb when finished)
Seeds native to your area (Check with your local Nature Conservancy or your state's department of natural resources for which seeds/plants are native to your area)( buy seed mixtures of native flowers and plants. Not only will they grow well, they will not crowd out other plants, disrupt bird and insect populations, or do other environmental damage)
Compost or worm castings
Yogurt container top or any large flat surface


For the dried red clay mix 5 parts clay with 1 part compost and 1 part flower seeds, put some careful drops of water into the mixture(make sure not to make it into a goopy sloppy mess!), Knead with hands into a ball, flatten it out and cut to desired size. Now just make into a small ball and let it dry in the sun. Now you have a red clay seed bomb.


<p>When used for permaculture<br>seed bombs/balls are great, but it's ILLEGAL to dump seed bombs on private<br>property. Dumping is a TRESPASS. Here's what's going on in my part of the<br>upper middle class world: whenever a neighbor has a problem with another neighbor<br>he or she bombards their neighbor's house with seed bombs. Seed bombs not only ruin landscapes that cost<br>thousands of dollars to plant but they also invite rodents. That's correct--rats, white footed mice,<br>brown mice, chipmunks, rabbits, squirrels, many birds and their predators are<br>attracted to seed balls/bombs. The rodents chew up expensive roots on bushes,<br>trees and herbaceous plants as they desperately try to eat all the seeds and<br>moss. Rodent's poop also attracts their<br>predators, and those predators tear up the garden looking for rodents. As if<br>this is not bad enough some have decided to throw glass shards inside the seed<br>balls.Seed bombing private<br>property, other than yours, could cause the destruction of property and it is<br>illegally dumping. Dumping is against<br>the law and a person can get a fine, arrested or sued for such acts. As for children, anyone teaching them to<br>throw seed balls on private property other than their own, is encouraging<br>bullying and unlawful behavior, and therefore corrupting minors.</p>
<p>How many years of blighted property should one endure before attempting to cover it in regional flowers?</p>
<p>Easy to make and they work great. I never attracted and critters from these .</p>
<p>that's great - I love it. </p>
<p>Even though it might add a little bit to the expense of making the <br>&quot;bombs&quot; couldn't you use catfish dough ball bait for the interior of the <br> &quot;bombs&quot;, perhaps the stuff with blood mixed in.</p>
<p>I think that would attract critters who could eat them - and also it would not be as shelf-stable as the clay. You'd have a lot of happy mice and birds though.</p>
<p>Thats spectacular...</p>
<p>This is really great. Cool idea mate</p>
<p>Cool that's just epic</p>
<p>Cool that's just epic</p>
To &quot;I AM IN THE SHED&quot;
Ok, I know this is a bit old, but I have a thought. Even though it might add a little bit to the expense of making the &quot;bombs&quot; couldn't you use catfish dough ball bait for the interior of the &quot;bombs&quot;, perhaps the stuff with blood mixed in.
Cool that's just epic
I saw this at a shop yesterday and was wondering how to make it! great!
if your &quot;planting&quot; at the right moment, and right away, I soak my seeds ahead of time. Seeds need to soak up moisture and if you soak them over night they will germinate in days.. The seed will grow right out of the small ball, roots will go down and the plant will grow up. What you are doing is hiding the seed from birds and allowing it to germinate. <br> <br>You only dry them to keep your pocket clean, a damp ball tossed into the planting bed will sprout sooner. seeds need moisture and warmth, think spring! sunshine and rain
To &quot;I AM IN THE SHED&quot; <br>Amen, and Amen some more! Grammar aside, there is a fine line between giving enough instruction, and being too long-winded. Heaven forbid that the author of an &quot;instructable&quot; expects one of two things; that the reader has a certain level of intelligence and understanding to be able to complete the project, or that they will be able to simply ask the author a simple question to clarify things. Slamming someone never clears up confusion, and often adds to the problem.
what do they do again?
Ok, I know this is a bit old, but I have a thought. Even though it might add a little bit to the expense of making the &quot;bombs&quot; couldn't you use catfish dough ball bait for the interior of the &quot;bombs&quot;, perhaps the stuff with blood mixed in. You could just stuff the seeds into the dough balls, then make little raviolis with them and the clay, and then coat the outside of those with compost? Another option would be to roll the dough bait in the seeds and then cover with clay. The dough bait would have moisture as well as a compost like composition ready to go.
Going by the comments, a lot of people don't understand how these things work. Of course, the instructions don't explain it either.&nbsp;<br /> <br /> The clay is there to protect seeds from being eaten, especially by birds. Birds won't eat things covered with clay or clay dust. So alternatives like papier mache wouldn't work (and would possibly be more expensive.)&nbsp;<br /> <br /> The seed bombs shouldn't break open. In fact they should stay relatively intact even after they have been wet by rain a few times. That way the seeds stay protected and moist.&nbsp;When the seeds germinate, they will break through the clay.&nbsp;<br /> <br /> They seeds don't need water right away. They will stay dormant until rain comes. If the seeds are the right for the area, then they will do fine. Of course, not every single seed will sprout.&nbsp;<br /> <br /> But the comment about using plants that are native to the area is an important one. Buy seed mixtures of native flowers and plants. Not only will they grow well, they will not crowd out other plants, disrupt bird and insect populations, or do other environmental damage.&nbsp;