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Hello Instructablers.

I do quite a bit of driving these days. I visit customers in country towns and some days spend five to six hours behind the wheel.

I like to use my Samsung Galaxy Tablet for music, navigation, CRM, and emails. For navigation and music I had to find a way of mounting the tablet to make it as safe as possible to use while mobile.

My first attempt was made from a plastic travel mug, duct tape, and a coat hanger. It worked quite well, but it was truly ugly.

My next effort (with valuable assistance from my daughter Lucy) gave a much more satisfying result, and that is what I will be setting out in this Instructable.

The basic concept is a plastic frame to hold the tablet supported by an upright that is anchored by a cast silicone block ("Oogoo") made to fit snugly in the centre console cup holder.

Step 1: Materials and Equipment

Materials
2 x Perspex or Plexiglass sheets 350x260mm (I got mine from eBay for $5 per sheet).
1 x Plywood to make a template the same size and thickness of your tablet.
2 x Plywood strips approx 40x200mm.
6 x countersunk head screws (or strong glue if you prefer)
2 x 500g tubes of silicone sealant
1 x 500g bag of corn starch (corn flour)
optional oil based paint for colour.
optional copper pipe or similar to make pen holders if desired.

Equipment
Heat gun
Jigsaw ( with blades for wood and plastic)
Drill
Clamps
Plastic freezer bag (large size)
Disposable rubber gloves
Container and spoon for mixing silicone
Simple workshop tools (screwdriver, hammer, marker pen, etc.)

Step 2: Make the Tablet Frame


• Place your tablet on the plywood sheet and mark around it.
• Cut out the sheet to make a template the same dimensions as the tablet.
• Cut out the three extra strips of plywood to hold the hot folded edges of the perspex.
• I found the A4 sized sheet of perspex was exactly the right size for the Galaxy Tab. If you have a different tablet, cut the sheet to suit allowing about 30mm on each side and at the bottom for folding.
• Cut the bottom two corners off the perspex to allow for folding.
• Clamp the template to the perspex sheet with the top edge flush and equal overhang on each side.
• With the heat gun, carefully heat one edge of the perspex until it becomes soft and pliable.
• With gloves on your hands use one plywood strip to fold the edge of the perspex around the template and clamp it in place until it cools and hardens.
• Repeat this process for the remaining side ant the bottom edge.
• Mark the locations of buttons.
• Remover the template.
• Cut away any perspex that covers buttons.
• Test the size with the actual tablet. Mark and cut holes for the headphones and power sockets.
• If the size is not right you can simply reheat the perspex and it will return to its original shape.

Step 3: Make the Upright


The upright is the part that supports the frame and holds it in the correct position. The frame is attached to the top part of the upright and the bottom part is cast into the silicone base.

• Cut perspex 350mm long and 50mm wide.
• Drill some holes into the lower part to help it key into the silicone base.
• Heat and bend the bottom part to lock it into the base.

•Consider what else you can cast into the base of the unit. I made two pen holders from short lengths of copper pipe - about 60mm long with one end flattened.




Step 4: Cast the Base


This is the fun part. It's pretty messy so use disposable rubber gloves

• Mix silicone and corn flour at about 1:1 ratio by volume. For more details see Mikey77's excellent Instructable How To Make Your Own Sugru Substitute. This works much like mixing bread dough. It doesn't seem to cooperate at first, but soon comes together to form a nice elastic dough. I just used my hands and added more flour if it continued to be too sticky.
• When you have a nice elastic ball of dough drop it into a clean plastic freezer bag. This will protect the car.
• Push the bottom of the upright into the dough and squeeze the dough to get it into all the holes and to eliminate trapped air.
• Insert the pen holders or whatever accessories you have chosen to include.
• Drop it into the cup holder of the car.
• Manipulate the upright to get it into a good position and push the dough so it completely fills the space within the cup holder.
• Leave it all in position for a few hours to let it cure. Make sure the car windows are open.

Step 5: Attaching Frame and Final Positioning

• Once the silicone has cured you can remove the plastic bag.

• Position the upright and the frame in the car at the ideal positionand mark where to attach them. Remember that final adjustment will be made later.

• Attach the frame to the upright using countersunk screws or glue.

• Use the heat gun to carefully heat and soften the upright.

• Position the tablet frame as you want it and hold it in that position until the perspex cools and hardens.

• Make sure the unit doesn't block any controls or gauges.

• If it's not as you like it simply reheat and try again.


I found the upright to be slightly too flexible making the thing quite wobbly. I rectified this by gluing an extra strip of perspex behind the upright.

Once the glue is dry the unit is ready for testing. Drop the tablet into the frame. Plug in your leads and you're ready to rock and roll.

Step 6: Conclusion


This system has worked well for me, and I think it looks OK for a prototype. I would be really interested to hear your suggestions for improvements, or new ideas using the cast silicone base concept.
I hope you have enjoyed my Instructable; if you like my work you might like to visit my Etsy shop at this link.

Step 7: Formlabs


I have created this Instructable especially to enter the Formlabs contest. The prizes include Formlabs' impressive FORM 1+ 3D Printer. I would truly love to get my hands on one of these in order to:



• Start experimenting with creating replacement water pump parts for remote locations, and get my colleagues in the water pump industry thinking about the the new opportunities that technology like this brings.
• Modelling structures like bridges, stadia, etc.
• Making artworks using my own 3D AutoCAD drawings.
• And a plethora of other stuff that hasn't been thought of yet.



Thanks Formlabs for providing the inspiration for this project and for the massive range of great ideas that I'm sure this contest will reveal.

Step 8: SAFETY

After many comments from concerned readers I have decided to add an extra step to point out what should be obvious.

Don't let small children use power tools without very careful supervision.
Don't use a tablet while driving a car.
Don't use a tablet holder in your car if it is against the law.

You have been warned!




anyone ever tried food coloring for the silicone I thought I read that somewhere i didnt try it
<p>This is awesome. I use my phone for GPS since my regular GPS is slow/old/inaccurate. I have trouble finding a mount I like. This will be my next project. Only change I might make would be the bar attaching the cup holder to the back plate. I'll likely use a flexible tube like you find on a desk lamp. Thank you for the idea.</p>
<p>Good idea. I hope you can share a picture when make it.</p>
<p>I absolutely adore this instructable. First and foremost because you have your young daughter helping you and learning that girls can do shop projects. I grew up in the 70's when girls were not allowed to take shop. Kudos to you. I'm sure this is semi illegal depending where you live but it could be adapted to a back seat workstation or movie station as well. Sorry for all the naysayers, but I'm sure you are going to use this item in the most legal and safe way. It doesn't diminish the project or your awesome Dadness:)</p>
<p>Thanks Puggirl. I'm so glad that someone gets that this concept can be adapted to other purposes. </p>
<p>What's the minimum size?</p>
<p>Ha ha,you are very funny.</p><p>The kid is very young,is it better now smart guy?</p>
<p>I must thank for this amazing instructable. I was struggling to find one suitable Samsung Note 10.1&quot; holder as space between dashboard and windscreen doesn't allow me to fit any available tablet holder. Improvisation that comes in my mind would be that bottom piece which seats in cup holder can have an upper circular ring with tooth like formation which would lock into a ring in bottom ring of the table holding frame. If required, remove it, turn it and replace it at an different angle. This would give flexibility of angle in which the car driver wants. Additionally, it comes in my mind to have something which also gives flexibility of setting height.</p>
Great ideas.<br>Mine is not at all adjustable without the heat gun.
<p>Hi Guys and Gals,</p><p>Great Idea and design, but these are illegal in the UK and Europe, Any such screen that can be seen / watched by the driver in a total NO No. Even turned of they are not allowed.. Nav screens are to a specific spec and meet the codes.</p><p>Sorry but thought i must raise this.</p><p>Roger</p>
<p>Thanks for your comments. Good point about the varying road rules around the world.</p>
<p>I saw part of what you wrote: &quot;Thanks for commenting. Your anti-american sentiment <br>might not adhere to the &quot;be nice&quot; policy though. By the way; do you know <br> what side of...&quot; It's not being anti-American. I was guessing that's where you are but obviously it could be anywhere.</p>
<p>Very good point. I was going to say the same myself. </p><p>This is a very bad idea as it's so easy to be distracted and risk other people's lives as well as your own. It seems that in the States, there is very little regard for things that could be dangerous to others. (I can only presume you are in USA.)</p>
<p>☺</p>
<p>Give it a rest. It's a Photo-Op</p>
<p>You got it.</p><p>It was also an opportunity to learn about the workshop and making stuff.</p>
<p>Soooo many people forget, it is 95% maturity level and competence. Being little or big, has VERY little to do with the equation. I know plenty of &quot;big people&quot; that I would let use a 12&quot; handheld wood saw...</p>
<p>Quite right. Thanks.</p>
<p>sorry, ***wouldn't***</p>
plexiglass is a very good idea. its tranceparent and easy to use.
<p>Thanks. Yes it's good stuff. Haven't used it before.</p>
<p>I think the only thing that comes to mind right away is to maybe use a single piece of plexi to form not only the upright but to go straight into the cup holder as well. It could then be fit into the cupholder which would let you use almost all of the space of the cupholder</p>
<p>Good idea. Worth a try next time.</p><p>One advantage of the silicone is the weight helps hold it in place.</p>
<p>cool I might make a smaller of this for my ipod.</p>
<p>please share a picture if you do.</p>
<p>Nice, food for thought. The great thing about this site. Forgot to mention, &quot;cute kid&quot;.</p>
<p>thanks</p>
<p>I love this brilliant idea. Thanks for sharing this!</p>
<p>thanks</p>
<p>Wait a minute. She's not old enough to drive! lol nice article though.</p>
<p>ha ha thanks</p>
<p>OK, I have to ask, are you one of those people I see going down the hwy at 75 MPH with their eyes on something other than the road? If people are smart enough to pull over to attend to the tablet, then I have no problem with this.</p>
<p>I'm not one of those people.</p>
<p>I am guessing the little girl was just posed there. I think it is a cute way to get both Dad/Kid time, and get your kid involved in something that does not involved a controller/joystick and a TV.</p><p>Good going Cammers. on Dad skills and on 'ibles. I am trying to figure a similar solution for our car, but we have a Mustang and the drink cup is too far back, but I may incorporate some of what you have done.</p>
<p>You guessed correctly. Just fun pictures with some exposure to the workshop along the way.</p>
<p>great idea </p>
<p>Thanks</p>
<p>I see you like to encourage your daughter to do things whilst she is still young well done when both my children were 4 and 6 i took them into work with me at weekends and started them welding nut and bolt men together to give them something to do everyone told me i was mad letting a 4 year old boy and 6 year old girl gas weld but they both had fun and did not do anything stupid i always believe it is better to learn haw to do something when you are young than wait until you are older as most the time if you wait then you are not interested when the time comes.</p><p>a great tablet holder by the way i like working with acrilic sheet as it is much easier to work with than many other materials i have a laptop holder i made on a swing out arm above my work bench, i wish i had thought about bending the sides up like you did i just bent the front and back then made fitted sides which i glued together but it worked ok plus the glued sides help support the base to stop it drooping so much.</p><p>a great instructable many thanks, i keep thinking i will put one up but i normaly remember about doing one when i have finished the project.</p><p>regards Poppy Ann. </p>
<p>Thanks.</p>
Great idea for tablet holding maybe it could be a kit with my table lols. But anyway really good especially the plastic clean look although a word of advice only use for gps it could cause accident
<p>Thanks. I really just use it for music while I'm mobile. And occasionally for navigation. </p>
<p>Do you/can you pop it out when not in use? I was wondering how it would hold up to hot summer/freezing winter temps. </p>
<p>Yes. The base is made to fit the cup holder, but its not adhered to it.</p>
<p>sweet, after all the car instructables, finally a car I recognise..<br><br>Might try this out, even though my AU Fairmont has the crappiest cup holders known to man</p>
<p>By far on eo fth ebest solutions i have ssen yet;</p><p>all mounts are made in black material, so when the tablet is not in the car, you have an ugly post war spider-kind-a-thing sitting there, this transparent material is simply genious.</p><p>The mix of silicone and flour, never heard of it, but if it can hold your tablet in place, it must be really strong.</p><p>So your solution combines 2 eye openers for me.</p><p>I was lucky to be able to stick my tablet on my dash on a perfect location with just a few magents. But my smartphone still needs a cradle so i am about to check out how your idea can work for that.</p>
<p>Thanks BG. All the best for your phone mount. Please share some pictures of the result.</p>
hopefully the little girl did this kids need to know how tools work. they can be very dangerous but doesn't mean she or anyone should be afraid!

About This Instructable

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