Recently I purchased a new BBQ. I don't have a grill lifter and I want to add handles to the grills to make it easier to add more charcoal or pieces of wood for smoking.

Obviously I would need to have some oven mitts grill mitts to lift a hot grill. With clumsy mitts though I wouldn't be able to grab the grill - I need a handle (preferably two)

Step 1: What you'll need

Per grill we need to assemble these parts:
2 U-Bolts with cross plate
8 smaller washers
4 larger washers - make sure they're wider then the gap between the grill bars
4 additional nuts for U-bolts

<p>This is a very great and straightforward procedure. The important part here is that it's very easy to do and helpful for your BBQ grilling. You may also want to check our US made pig roasters here in http://www.lacajachina.com/</p>
How did you close the lid without moving the &quot;handles&quot; in?
<p>On this grill, the lid is a half dome. There was enough clearance.</p>
<p>There is some controversy over the topic but do try to use stainless steel quality parts instead of any kind of galvanized hardware. Heating zinc at high temperatures is no good for you. </p>
<p>I agree that stainless steel would be best, however, the zinc plated parts would need to heat up to over 600 degrees before it would be of any health concern.</p>
<p>Natural/lump charcoal grill can easily reach temperatures of over 1000&deg; F.</p>
<p>IF the charcoal in the grill pictured in this instructable reached 1000 degrees (which it couldn't), there wouldn't be anything left of the meat to even talk about. Try to keep it in perspective. </p>
<p>Sure it could. I've measured my lump coal fire with my Fluke 62 and it goes off the scale (932&deg; F maximum). Some sources claim lump charcoal can get up to 1400&deg; F. It wouldn't vaporize the meat, but great for a quick sear.</p>
<p>If you honestly believe that the grill in THIS instructable is capable of reaching those temps, then I suppose there isn't any point in further discussion. You win. Happy?</p>
<p>It has nothing to do with the grill. The fuel will burn as hot as the fuel burns.</p>
<p>Like I said, you win.</p>
<p>Zinc/galvanizing should NEVER come in contact with food. The food itself can cause a negative reaction with the zinc. At any temperature.</p>
<p>Quote your source. Know your facts. http://www.fda.gov/food/guidanceregulation/retailfoodprotection/foodcode/ucm188064.htm</p>
<p>600 degrees Farenheit or Celcius?</p>
<p>It never ceases to amaze me at the brilliant ideas I see on here! Just last night I was watching my hubby grill on our Green Egg that has the round grill and lifter and worried he would eventually get a nasty burn. Then I find this today. Already shared it with him. </p>
<p>Great idea. </p><p>PS: I would do the bottom grill too. Help to avoid dirty hands for clean up.</p>
<p>Thanks ckeefe. I added the pic of the bottom grill completed. I had done it but simply not posted the pic.</p>
<p>One of those &quot;Gee, why didn't I think of that!&quot; things. Genius!</p>
<p>Brilliant! So simple but perfectly effective! Great idea. Thanks for sharing!</p>
Awesome idea!
Great, or grate, idea!
<p>Thank you - glad you liked it.</p>
<p>What an awesome idea!</p>
<p>Thank you Sir</p>
<p>Great Idea. This is so simple it's brilliant.</p>
<p>Thank you Michael - much appreciated.</p>

About This Instructable


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Bio: I'm typical. I love my kids, I like food and love cooking. I'm into martial arts, BBQ's, grilling, and cars.
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