How to Multiply Your Spider Plants

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Introduction: How to Multiply Your Spider Plants

The Spider Plant, or Chlorophytum comosum, is possibly the most popular house plant. They are good at purifying the air in your home and they are very easy to maintain. The purpose of this instructable is to teach you how to make more spider plants from your starter plant.

Step 1: Finding the Baby Spiders

If you have had a spider plant you will already know that periodically the plant will send down stems with little plants, or spiders on them. If you look closely you can see that there are roots starting to develop on some of these baby spiders. Carefully hold the baby spider plant and separate it from the stem being sure not to break the roots off of it.

Step 2: Option #1: Starting the Baby in Water.

You can take the baby plant and set the roots in a cup of water for a week or two so the roots may grow bigger. I use a blank CD to keep the whole plant from falling into the cup. Be sure to check the water every couple days, if the plant goes dry for too long it may die.

Step 3: Option #2: Starting the Plant in Dirt Immediately.

 If you have a plant that is already going and you want to thicken up the growth in the pot you might just want to add the baby to it right away. In that case just dig a little hole and plant it in. After you finish planting it remember to water the plant right away. If you want to start a totally new plant use a small pot, a 2 inch pot would be plenty big to start one. Just use your best judgement in the proper size.

Step 4: Spider Plant Care

Spider plants are very easy to care for. Make sure that they have enough sun and water and they will be fine. If you are not sure if they need water just stick your finger in the soil, if it is dry water it, if it is moist leave it alone. Occasionally the leaves will turn brown and die off, this is normal. Just pull off the dead material or snip it off with a scissor and the plant will look good again. If you have any questions of comments please leave one below or send me a message, I will gladly try to help you out.

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Questions

I pinched my spider plant Arm do I need to cut that it has a baby at end ?

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38 Comments

Hi, I have the same issue as thebat777, I to would like to know what to do with my spider plant that has a now growth growing from the middle of the plant and now has a hybred growing from it. Should I cut it off and try to grow another plant or leave it be? Thank You

Can a spider grow only in water?

This is my spider plant. My mother gave me this last September ALMOST dead. It's now overflowing with babies!!! I'm fixing to pull pups off and put them in pots. I've always had it in the corner by window where sun shines thru and change potting soil every three months and use only miracle grow soil.

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1 reply

wow yours are so Beautiful!!!

I'm curious.... Ive noticed on my spider plant, and on yours like in your pictures... that some of the tips die. Should i trim the dead part off or leave it be? I don't want to kill it by cutting one that's not totally dead! Just thought it might make it look better! Thanks!!

3 replies

i read somewhere that its caused by too many minerals in the water and to use rainwater instead, not tried it myself.

It's the salt in the water. they say to use spring water or rain water, we have babies growing all over the place in our Office.

I trim mine back to the fresh leaf to keep it looking nice. I've had my plant for 25 years, they will make new leaves and old ones will die off but you won't kill your plant by cutting back the tips. I sometimes give mine a haircut when the whole thing gets too crazy, they just keep growing.

Nice. How much light do these need? I know they grow indoors but where i want it to go it wont get any direct sunlight.

Also can these be grown in only water? this could be an interesting one to throw in a hydroponics system.

1 reply

These spider plants are in my office - I have no windows, so they've never seen sunlight. I bought two grow lamps (red and blue LED types) on Amazon and the plants began growing like crazy.

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Here in florida, spider plants aren't just for indoors, although the recent stretch of cold weather may have some adverse effects = (  Spider plants tend to spread quickly and make great ground cover.. nicely done "ible"

2 replies

Really? I have several spiders growing outside the house. They do fine in Central Florida (Silver Springs)

Same here in south east Texas, and yep my spider plant almost died this past unusually cold winter. Thankfully it was large and I had it in a large pot and the center survived. It's a great multiplying plant.

(thanks for the instructable)

I got babies from my sister in law and kept them in water until ready to plant and now once planting they are dying....makes me very sad. She is far away and I cannot get any more

user

what do you do with the long stem which hang down on the plant

5 replies

I trim mine back near where it comes from the plant. After a while it will dry out and you can pull it out with ease. I leave the for a while, mine has pretty white flowers and lots of babies. You can start more plants if you like with the babies.

the long stem will produce babies which later you can make more plants with..

The long stems often put out tiny, delicate white flowers, but only when they're 'in the mood'. I've never noticed any rhythm or reason for them to suddenly flower, so you may have to be patient!

It will flower and seed probably when the "babies" don't reach water or soil to continue propagating. Probably also why the babies will grow babies to try to reach the ground..but they are babies so they eventually give up.

right, what you do is either take them off and root them in water once the plantlets have, what i call root buds, but i would not advise this because the roots that form are water roots and they may not take once potted into compost. another way is to place a pot close to the parent plant and peg down the plantlets and they should root in a couple of weeks. this is the best and most reliable way of propagating chlorophytum (spiderplant). the last way is to take them off, then put them into a plantpot. this method takes about two to three weeks. overall, you have three ways. i have two spiderplants in my greenhouse and it was one plant but i split it into two. they are the most vigorous ones i have ever had and i have a lot of babies. some are rooted and others are just forming. i have estimated about 50 babies from one with 3 stolons and 6 from the other. keep them slightly potbound to get more stolons. after the babies are off the mother, cut the stolons off as low down on the plant as possible. one of mine has got a seed pod and i would like to know if anyone has any tips on growing them from seed. mine are the type with green leaves and a white stripe down the middle. i know the seedlings will be all-green but i have no idea what to do from collecting seeds and then trying to germinate them. all tips are welcome. thank you.