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Step 1: Materials

A Mill
A Vise
Vise Nuts and Bolts
A Rubber Mallet (Or piece of wood.  Or your hand.  Just something softer than the vise)
Wrench
Dial Test Indicator
Shop Towel
And a collet (that fits the dial test indicator)

If, like me, you're not lucky to own all this equipment, you can get all of this and more with a TechShop membership!(http://techshop.ws) (I made it at the TechShop)
<p>I think that it is important to note. You squared the vice using the fixed jaw instead of the movable jaw. I think that you probably did this intentionally, it is better to measure against the fix jaw when possible to remove errors due the slop that is inherent with the movable jaw.</p>
Great job! Thanks for posting it! This has been a task that I've put off for a while but I just finished doing my Bridgeport. Beware of amateurs with a Bridgeport! <br> Thanks again,. <br> Ken
That's a dead blow hammer i believe, do you recommend that over a rubber mallet? Does it really matter?
good instructable. im an aprentice in a machine shop. ( i have to square up the vices all the time) i can now do it with 2 taps ofthe mallet :) . I have been told that you shouldent dial in the fixed jaw. instead you should put a parrelel in the vice prowd of the jaws lock the vice down so that it is clamping with alot of pressure. and use the stylus on the parralel. this is because the fixed jaw can have a tendency to move. &quot;you always set up everything in the way its going to be used&quot; Eg clamping . ( this isnt suposed to sound agressive ) :)
Not aggressive at all. Sounds like a fine idea, especially if you have a beat up vise. Thanks!
My brother has been wanting to make a <a href="http://www.heraldryandcrests.com/heraldry-crests-products/embroidery/" rel="nofollow">family crest</a>. Do you have any advice I could give to him? He seems really excited. I think he's planning it as a gift for someone in our family.
Nice! thanks. <br>
I clamp a ground bar in my vise that sticks up some and let the indicator ride against that. Vise jaws aren't always in the greatest shape. The ones I'm seeing in your pictures have certainly taken some shots. Perhaps how I'm doing isn't the easiest way though? Also, when I worked in a tool and die shop I was taught to slide the vise into position. Makes sure chips and junk don't end up under the vise. We didn't just drop a vise onto a table. <br> <br>A lot of people call what you describe here, &quot;tramming a fixture&quot;. In your case specifically tramming a vise. You're not really squaring it, so much as making it parallel to the ways.
I clamp a ground bar in my vise that sticks up some and let the indicator ride against that. Vise jaws aren't always in the greatest shape. The ones I'm seeing in your pictures have certainly taken some shots. Perhaps how I'm doing isn't the easiest way though? Also, when I worked in a tool and die shop I was taught to slide the vise into position. Makes sure chips and junk don't end up under the vise. We didn't just drop a vise onto a table. <br> <br>A lot of people call what you describe here, &quot;tramming a fixture&quot;. In your case specifically tramming a vise. You're not really squaring it, so much as making it parallel to the ways.

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