Instructables

How to Use a Horizontal Bandsaw (With Accuracy and Precision)

Featured
This is a horizontal bandsaw.  It's usually used to cut stock to rough length, but with a couple of tricks and a bit of finesse you can use it to cut accurately (within a few thousands) again and again.
 
Remove these adsRemove these ads by Signing Up

Step 1: Measure and Mark the Workpiece

Picture of Measure and Mark the Workpiece
DSCF3062.JPG
DSCF3065.JPG
DSCF3070.JPG
First, measure and mark your workpiece.  Using a little Dykem Blue makes the scribed line a lot easier to see, but isn't absolutely necessary.  Use whatever tool is appropriate to mark the desired cut line.  Here, I use a digital height gauge and make a mark at one inch from the end.

Step 2: Safety First

Return to the machine and make sure the emergency stop is activated (pressed in) and the feed rate is set to zero.  People like to leave these active after using the machine.  On the TechShop saw, the feed control knob is located on the top of the machine.

Step 3: Insert the Workpiece into the Horizontal Bandsaw

Lift the bandsaw head by the red handle until there's enough clearance for the workpiece to fit.  Lightly secure the workpiece in place by sliding the moveable jaw of the vise against it.  Don't clamp it into place yet, we'll need to slide it back and forth to locate the cut accurately.  Loosen the blade guide and move it as close as possible to the workpiece.  Dont' move the guide so far in that it will impact the workpiece as it drops, however.  If the guide is too far out, you might not get a straight cut, but it isn't worth risking damage to the machine.

Step 4: Prepare for Positioning

With the feed rate set to zero, disengage the emergency stop (twist the knob counter-clockwise until it pops out).  Press the feed button and turn the speed knob to lower the bandsaw head.  Keeping an eye on the rate of descent, lower the blade until it's just above the workpiece.  Re-engage the emergency stop and set the feed rate back to zero.
It helps to check blade tension, as a loose blade wiggles, slips and will loose more teeth, and an over tight blade may break more often
Phil B1 year ago
I do not have access to one of these, but thank you for the information.
Pro

Get More Out of Instructables

Already have an Account?

close

PDF Downloads
As a Pro member, you will gain access to download any Instructable in the PDF format. You also have the ability to customize your PDF download.

Upgrade to Pro today!