Step 3: Set up your hammock

this is very easy now that you have your parachute cord. find two trees about 9 feet apart and strong enough to hold your hammock up. the distance between them is a matter of personal preference  and also depends on your hammock, so experiment and you will find what you like.

wrap your parachute cord around the tree tightly enough that it wont slip down. how do you wrap it around? however you want, that's whats great about the rope you made. you can wrap it once, twice, tie a ravens head, feed one end of the rope through the loop, any way you can make it work on your tree. just keep in mind that any knot you tie and sleep on will probably not come out very easily. parachute cord is not easy to work backwards with (but you should be able to get away with not tying any knots, just loop it around and put your carabiner in the two end loops).

now take your carabiner and put it through the loops in the cord. put one end of your hammock on the carabiner. repeat for the other tree. your hammock should hang in a gentle curve, you don't want a huge sag as your rope, hammock and trees will bend and stretch as you settle in.

Many people have expressed concern about the rope damaging the trees. Here on the west coast most of the trees I hammock on are huge and tough, and paracord wrapped around them doesnt seem to do any damage. If you live somewhere where your trees aren't as hardy and have thinner bark, you could use flat webbing for climbing or polypropylene truck straps. Just wrap these around the tree a couple of times and hang your rope and hammock from that. 
I am a proud owner of a Hennessy Hammock A-Sym Expedition, and can't agree more with the comfort afforded over sleeping on the ground. In response to rope damage to trees, the Hennessy uses two lengths of seat-belt strap material, which is looped preferably twice around each tree; the hammock ties into these loops. One major drawback could be the lack of comfort in cooler weather. (This would apply to all hammocks.) While most don't have a problem with this in the middle of the summer, in higher elevations you can easily experience lower 50 degree temps in May or August. Normally on a foam or Thermarest style mattress, you are provided a good margin of insulation against the ground. When you are in a hammock, the sleeping bag's insulation is compressed (like it is on the ground), however now you only have a thin piece of nylon between you and the night air. (I suffered an entire night of no sleep and shivering because of my ill-preparedness) Hennessy has come up with an insulating system, which amounts to another length of fabric stretched closely underneath the main hammock, into which you can stuff pine needles, leaves, or any other suitable material to provide a thermal barrier to keep the cool wind off your rear end. A Thermarest mattress inside the hammock is an OK alternative, however this adds considerable bulk to your pack. Some people recommend sleeping on a foil car sunscreen or even an emergency "space" blanket. Unless certain precautions are taken, there is a HUGE problem with these materials. The foils are an absolute barrier - in this case, a vapor barrier. Moisture leaving you WILL condensate on these foils in cooler temps - you will become soaked and miserable. The KEY is to affix the "space blanket" somehow to the OUTSIDE of the hammock. This will reflect your radiant heat back to you, but keeps the inherent moisture away from your sleeping bag. I also have the Amazonas Traveler, and use it regularly. What a lightweight marvel! It doubles as my pine needle and leaf holder in colder weather, I simply attach it with sew-on velcro bits I've affixed for this purpose. (put the scratchy sides on the outside of the upper hammock, so the lower one doesn't chafe when it is used as a hammock itself.) If you want to do cold-weather hammocking, try it out at home where you can easily retreat inside if your system failed for some reason. I have been using the hammock in the DEAD of winter VERY COMFORTABLY. Just use a little common sense to keep Jack Frost off your rear end!
I've found that the foam pad inside the sleeping bag works fine for insulation. while it does add some bulk to your pack, there is hardly any weight to them. i usually roll mine up, put it in my pack and unroll it to fill the space and act as an inner wall. this helps the pack stay open as i pack it, and keeps things from poking against the thin nylon.
Your method for packing the foam pad sounds great! Not only does it protect the nylon, but with today's internal frame packs, I'm sure it would make it much easier to see and get to the necessary contents of your pack when making camp! Cool Idea!
<p>The problem I tend to have with packing my ridge rest like this is that I have to empty and repack my backpack every morning.</p>
I have the Hennessy A-Sym as well and in the cold weather I use an Exped downmat 9 inside the hammock. I've been using it for three years and its great. It also compacts much smaller that the ThermoaRest.
<p>A nylon climbing sling is also really handy, as well as reliable like all climbing gear. They are really light and hard to tangle, so you won't have any problems with them.</p>
I just picked up the ENO hammock and hope to get out next weekend to try it out. Good article and tips.
How do you get the foam pad inside the sleeping bag and then yourself inside it? I've only been able to zip up the foot box a foot or 2, hook my feet into it, then tuck the bag's zippered edges between my body and the foam underneath the bag. (all this because once i'm in the bag i can't move around)
I think you hit the nail on the head with hammocks over sleeping on the ground. and like you said with the addition of a tarp you can eliminate the need for a tent... but better still, try to find a G.I. rain poncho. they serve double duty. Rain gear, and one of the most compressible tarps i have ever seen. they have gromets in the middle of all 4 sides and at all 4 corners. if you set up your hammock with carabiners you can just slip the gromets at the corners of the poncho through them. it should fit nice and tight making a peak when you lay in the hammock. no extra rope needed... also, as far as knots, i use about 5 ft. of rope at each end, and fasten the ends together in a fisherman's knot so the length of the loop can be adjusted from about 1.5 ft. to 2.5 ft. . then in the middle i tie a figure 8 Knot leaving a 2-3 inch loop at the end for my carabiner...
The reason a military poncho is so good a tarp, is because it's designed to be. It's even referenced in the army training manuals, notably the section about shelters, as being used for a bashsa, a wigwam cover, etc.....
Light infantryman checking in. I can swear to the poncho being useful as a hammock, and as a tarp. It'll support your weight, and in the tropics, where the bugs are thick on the ground, it'll make for a much MUCH better sleep. If you get two, you can make an overhead shelter for yourself as well for rain.
What do you do about the head opening in the poncho? Doesn't rain come through that opening or puddle in the hood during heavy rains? Also, does anyone have any suggestions for the best place to get a military poncho, without enlisting, of course...
It isn't that much of a problem. You lay it flat along the rest of the surface and it should sort of meld flat to the rest. And it is a bit of an expedient. In a heavy rain, you are going to get a little moist. I can't imagine that military ponchos will be hard to find. Any surplus place in the world will have them, as will suppliers like Cheaper Than Dirt or Brigade Quartermaster. Enlisting isn't the best option. When you change stations they ask for the stuff back ;)
he is also correct, its not an issue.
The new ones issued nowadays dont have the head opening. they have a fastener system around all edges. <br>
No, there's a drawcord to cinch it around your face when you wear it. Pull it all the way closed and use the string to lash it to an overhead branch. You'll almost never get wet, but taller folks will wish for more coverage. I've been planning on buying a lighter weight nylon taffeta fly that's bigger than a poncho. 30 oz. taffeta will hold up a reasonably careful adult. There's a nice 'ible on here about making a hammock with ONLY fabric and rope, no assembly required.
Busybody here would like to make a comment - don't you get back pain after sleeping like that? <br>In many regions of Brazil, people sleep in hammocks - especially in the northeast and the north - but they do it differently, learned from the natives: <br> <br>http://www.baciadasalmas.com/images/2005/como_dormir_numa_rede.gif <br>(sorry, couldn't upload the picture, I don't know why) <br> <br>This is good, because your spine is straight and you can move somewhat and there's breathing space. : ) <br>
None of those pics are of me, they're my buddies from Scouts. I'm not sure about them, but I sleep in mine diagonally. <br>
Instead of getting the underquilt you could just modify your sleeping bag to have the hammock inside of it.
Surprised that no-one has mentioned tie-down straps, either the ratcheting or slip style for wrapping around the tree &amp; hooking to the hammock. Super easy, much stronger then necessary, light weight &amp; compact &amp; can be used for many other things when camping also.
Exactly, many people use straps to wrap around trees to protect the bark. The polypro straps are popular because they're lightweight and strong, as you said, but also have almost no stretch under load. I used 3/4&quot; tubular climbing webbing with loops tied in the ends, and I find the little bit of stretch helps to &quot;soften&quot; the hang.
I don't own a bed, I 've been sleeping in a hammock for 3 yrs now and wouldn't trade it for anything. If I decide to do some outdoor snoozing it will be with a Hennessy for sure as the bugs get bad here.
Cool! I slept in a hammock for a while in high school. I just moved into my own place and found myself sans bed for the first time ever and this afternoon my new hammock went up in my room! It's the best!
It's also worth pointing out that some areas actually have ban on ropes strung around trees, lest they damage the tree, but it's usually specifically round ropes or cords. You can buy (right...) or make a set of wider (1.5 -- 2 in) straps instead and most places have no problem with them. The concern is simply that the tree bark may actually recieve rope burns. I think it's maybe more an issue with tent/tarp guywires that flap in the wind and rub, but then it's hard to say what the weight of a person tensioning it and rolling around restlessly all night would do.
rei used to have a scrap bin full of the ends from their rolls of 1&quot; tubular webbing. usually real cheep. if that is unavailable brand new webbing is quite cheap.
I inherited a small, dilapidated old cabin in the woods. Really, there's no room for a bed, so I tried hanging a hammock from the rafters. Works like a charm for sleeping, but I can't snuggle with the girlfriend!
Oh but you CERTAINLY can, ask any mayan or central american ;)<br>Hammocks (hamacas) are used from the Yucatan peninsula to Venezuela, some people don&acute;t even have beds!<br>look up the hamacasutra and you&acute;ll see LOL<br>
Check out Clark Jungle Hammocks (www.junglehammock.com). For a mere $600+ you can get yourself a two man hammock tent. ;-)
Crap, it's just two hammocks tied together at one end and tied wider on the other end! <br> <br>Make two &quot;sheet&quot; hammocks, place a separator on one end where the &quot;heads&quot; go and voila... just use good, strong rope and it can probably be done for under $20, minus the rain cover, but even that's not expensive with a tarp. <br> <br>I just made a simple sheet hammock this past week with cheap rope and had three individuals in it at one time (not sleeping, just testing). The rope was only rated at 120 lbs... but it held. <br> <br>I like the two man version though from the site; nice idea!
i use thie thin lightweight paracord to hold my hammock up aswell but people argue with me saying that i need to buy one og those wide straps the are easier then cord as it doesnt hurt the tree.... so far no tree i know has died from me but do you thhink i should leave the paracord?
i have some tree huggers and when i go camping with the boy scouts and on the appalachin trail hikes they work great!
Trees are, believe it or not, very tough. especially the kinds of trees you tie hammocks to. I have yet to see any real damage to a tree that i used paracord on. when i tie my hammock up i usually tie it to large conifers: Pines, redwoods, etc. these have very thick, tough bark that is pretty impenetrable to a humble bit of rope. If you choose to tie your hammock to a piece of rope tied to webbing tied around a tree thats fine, but thats just more knots and rope that can/will fail. and like i said, trees are tough.
To go along with the webbing strap debate, I made my own with a sewing machine but you could also do it by hand. Sport Chalet has webbing in different widths and also the cord (i think I used Spectra cord) sold by the foot. They also have a wire end melter that they use to cut the straps which makes it so you dont have to later. I folded the last six inches of each end of 2 straps and sewed three straight lines width wise to make loops at the end. Put it around a tree and pull the one loop through another and you're in buisness. To make the length coming off of the tree shorter just wrap the loose end around the tree till you have the right length.<br>
i like how you put the pad inside the sleeping bag!!
By lying at an angle the hammock will form a flatter bed. Some people find this better for their backs than the usual slumped posture.<br><br>
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i would use steel carabiners. whine they may ad extra weight you dont have to worry about micro cracks forming like they do in aluminum. even if they weigh more you only have to bring 2 insted of 4. (the conversion rule i was taught is that 2 steels = 4 aluminums. go figure.
Don't tie ropes around the tree.. use three or four long bungee cords, that go around the trunk, slip into the carabiner easily, cause friction, so as not to slide down, and is easy to disassemble in the morning. Plus, bungee cords are good for so many other things.
Bungee cords? You are joking, right?
Our Scout Troop uses bungee cords. They work great!
Boy scouting has changed! In my day, we learned how to use rope and tie knots.
Well, yes. We do that the most. I was just saying that sometimes we used bungee cords when it was raining and such, when we didn't want to set up in the rain.
I've used them with my hammock several times, no problem, easy to get around the trees and take apart, holds good, and I haven't noticed any wear or tear on the rubber.<br />
I hope he is. However, they are the hot ticket for rigging the rain fly.
Great job on this Instructable, HAL. I've thought about the insulation problem. This is my work-around: string-up the hammock, sit in it, then zip the sleeping bag around you and the hammock. It's basically a DIY Hennessy Hammock made of rope, cloth, and a sleeping bag. I'm thinking of making an instructable of my own to explain this set-up, referencing another &lt;http://www.instructables.com/id/Instant-Hammock/&gt; Instructable. Again, thanks for the great instructable and the inspiration.<br/>
Wouldn't there need to be a hole in both ends of the sleeping bag for? I don't think you can anchor a hammock to only one tree....
we thought about that, but the problem is that the hammock is both too wide and too long for the sleeping bag, unless you get a custom sleeping bag designed for that. but then it would be much larger and therefore heavier than necessary. putting a thin and light sleeping pad inside the sleeping bag underneath you really works well. i have stayed warm and dry every time i have used that method, and i've never experienced the condensation problem that some others have mentioned. somebody please try it an tell us what you think.
the last time i went camping with a hamick i had one with a insect screen and i rolled on it, broke it and fell to the ground.
Do anyone has the experience of using a hammock as a backpack? The question is how to wrap a EVA pad into a hammock and how could I load it on my back. Thanks!

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