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Light up dark areas in your home during daytime using this green and sustainable concept. Recycle used clear plastic soda bottles, add water+bleach, then install. After installation this solar light bulb can provide approximately 55 watts of light from the sun! 

The comments below have noted that this is like a solar tube or deck prism. 

The communities who benefit from this idea live in areas where the houses hardly have windows and live in darkness even during daytime. Their solution up until this innovation was to turn on the light bulb and use electricity.



Source: www.isanglitrongliwanag.org

Materials:
*PET soda bottle
*Galvanized Iron (GI) sheet
*Rubber sealant
*Bleach
*Filtered Water

Step 1: Cut approximately 9 x 10 inches of GI sheet (corrugated or flat)

(Filipino: Gumupit ng yero na may sukat na 9 x 10 inches.)


*Here is a how-to video
<p>I'm assuming the bleach is to stop the water going mucky. So you think you could use something else like vinegar? </p><p>I want to install one in my sons cubby house, and I don't trust him not to somehow at some point break it open. Even though it would be a weak solution, I don't want to risk it. </p>
Don't quote me on it because I don't know for sure but I believe it's because the way the bleach mixes with the water is how it reflects so much light but I personally don't know too much about chemistry so you could try it but I don't know
<p>All that the bleach is doing is keeping algae from growing in the solution. Any anti Algal would work, but beware, the lights usually last for 5 years until they degrade. (get foggy, break down or otherwise become unfit to refract light).</p>
<p>Lets see a 8W LED bulb {=60 watt incandescent} has an expected life of 50,000 hours (&gt;15 years) and uses 11 KWh/hr a year WHILE a solar light bulb {=55 watt incandescent} has an expected life of 14,600 hours (~5 years) and uses 0 KWh/hr a year. For the monies saved over the years, it isn't to much of a problem for the user to change the <strong><em>recycled</em></strong> soda bottles every five years! :-)</p>
<p>Your hours are off.</p><p>A LED is calculated as 3 hours use per day .</p><p>50,000 hours divided by 3 divided by 365 =45 years.</p><p>Apparently the solar light gets way more hours per day especially in the summer.</p><p>We don't think twice to throw a plastic bottle away, but in some countries plastic bottles are recycled which will put food on the table, so a plastic bottle is still a luxury for many of them. Sheet metal is expensive in those countries compare of income and such solar lights require silicone or other substance to seal it which will not last long either.</p><p> Solar lights making their grounds in those countries because the electricity can not be relied on. Power goes out on a constant bases every day and that is the reason those solar lights are getting more popular despite that is hard getting the materials for an individual to make those. </p>
<p>Chlorine in bleach is to prevent water going green from Algae.</p>
<p>Chlorine in bleach is to prevent water going green from Algae.</p>
What kind of bleach are gonna put in ? Just like commercial bleach?
<p>cool but this soda solar bottle bulb doesnt work on dark night. Moonlight maybe dont now. </p>
<p>Can not work at night .....no Sun</p>
<p>1 ) Chlorine in bleach is to prevent water going green from Algae.</p><p>2 ) Can not work at night .....no Sun </p>
<p>Great for desert areas... Not direct sunlight, yet you are lighted up with shelter... If you need... Then just grab your AC and just live your life out.</p>
<p>LOL if you had AC, you could just plug in a flourecent light bulb...</p>
<p>Hm... Can you do this without busting your roof open? Maybe... Place them on windows? Except it won't work at noon... Then, another amazing thought... What if people wayyyy back then could do this, and they could have made a clock out of it? like... think... If it went dark in the room, it was noon. If it was bright on one window, it was morning, on the other, evening... Then when it was dark altogether, then it was night.</p>
<p>Amazing idea. Free. Unlinke the Crowdfunding ideas which seek a millions to fund the development of a product the poor cannot afford.</p><p>This won't work under many non-solar conditions but when it does work it must be a miracle for these folks.</p><p>Now if the liquid could be made to store the light similar to fireflies and fish...</p><p>Have you tried using longer tubes, for instance an eight foot tall pipe in the corner of a room? Or a long clear plastic pipe and maybe diffuse its surface? Plastic fiber tubes are used to transfer light from one end to the other.</p>
<p>AMAZING! WHAT A GREAT PERSON THIS IS!!!!!!</p>
<p>My grandfather used this trick to light a work area in his barn when I was a kid. </p>
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Can it be installed on a roof made of bush? Just like huts. I doubt that heating can lead to accident but i am not sure about it. I want to install it to needy at my native place
<p>How long will this last? I don't mean how long per charge. Will the water and bleach have to be replaced, and if so, after how long?</p>

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Bio: This is the official account of Isang Litrong Liwanag (A Liter of Light). MyShelter Foundation&rsquo;s latest venture is a sustainable lighting project which aims ... More »
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