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Step 4: Build a strong foundation

As mentioned, I paid someone else to do the foundation. It cost in the neighborhood of $6k. Worth every penny.

Be sure and talk the plan (pictured below) over with whoever is setting up the site so that the garage gets poured in the right spot. They know their business, so ask for their advice. In my case, there was a utility pole that was interfering with the planned driveway somewhat. My plan originally called for a 2' set back from the property line, but based on the recommendation of the concrete guys, we pushed it out to 3' in order to clear the utility pole with some cushion. They moved their lines and no sweat, but once the forms are in place moving the placement gets more difficult, and once the concrete is in, then forget it.

The key steps to getting the foundation in are to lay out the lines for the foundation relative to the property lines, and to set up the site for the pour. To get the site ready the hole needs to be dug, the soil compacted, backfilled with suitable class-5 gravel, the forms erected in accordance with the lines, and reinforcement placed in the hole. The photo below shows my site just before concrete pour. You can see the grid of reinforcing metal rebar, the class-5 gravel and the forms.

Before you can pour in the concrete, you will need to have the site inspected by the city. They need to check and make sure you aren't doing anything stupid, are following code, and have placed the structure correctly based on the drawings signed off on by the city during the permit process and in agreement with property survey markers. This inspection will be arranged by the concrete subcontractor and everything should go smoothly if you have communicated with them well. If you are on your own, you just need to put in the call to the inspector and arrange a time. When you get your permit with the city they will give you a checklist for the inspector to sign as well as a phone number for your assigned inspector. Inspectors are friendly and helpful in general so don't hesitate to call and ask them questions. If they can answer a question on the phone it saves them a trip out to your job site.

With the forms inspected, the concrete can go in. One key thing to talk with the concrete guys about is the anchor bolts that will go into the foundation. The building code require anchors to be embedded in the concrete so that the bottom sill plate of the framing can be bolted to the foundation. There are specific rules about the placement of these bolts. Every six feet, within 12" of any cut in the sill plate, etc. Your concrete guys should know the rules. Make sure they know and clearly make where you are putting in your access door(s) and overhead door(s) so they can place the anchors correctly. In my case I had to have a single course of block around the foundation so that also required communication so that the openings would fit my doors.

After a day or so the concrete guys will come and take down to forms and clean up any spilled concrete. Be sure to communicate any concerns you have about the job if any at this time because this is the time that they will be expecting to get paid. Sometimes you will pay half up front and half upon completion. Once they get the second half of the money it can be hard to get them to come around and correct any problems so speak up before you write that check.

The next inspection you will need is the framing, so after a few days (~4) to let the concrete cure you can start building. Right about that time, you should expect a bunch of rain. Actually the rain will probably start as soon as the truck driver who delivered your lumber drives away.

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<p>This is awesome, such a thorough guide!</p><p>Also, great advice there in Step 11, I guess you learn something new every day.</p>
<p>Do you know how long a project like this usually takes? My sister and her husband have been wanting to build a garage outside their home for the past few weeks but they are traveling for the summer. They are trying to decide when would be the best time and how long it would take. I will have to pass these tips on to them though, thank you . </p><p>&lt;a href='http://www.toplinegarages.com.au/' &gt;&lt;/a&gt;</p>
The concrete takes a few days to do and then you need to let it cure a bit. Talk to the contractor on that, my guess is a week. <br><br>For us in MN, the best time to build is in September since it is still warm, one of the driest months, and less bugs. <br><br>If you have a slab with block and bolts for your sill plates, all the materials on-hand, a good set of plans, and a capable crew of 4-5 you could get the walls up, sheathed, windows in and the roof trussed and shingled in a weekend. After that, a day for electrical, a day for doors, and a day or two for siding. You could have a basic garage like mine done in a week. You only really need a crew for the walls and roof, I did the rest on my own on weekends and it took like 4 weekends or about 8-10 days of hard work.
<p>Would it be easier to do in the summer? I'm not sure if they have enough time with their jobs and kids to work on it themselves so it might be beneficial to hire someone for help. Although, doing it on the weekends seems like a great option. That way, friends and family can come and help if needed. </p>
<p>Please stop spamming Instructables.</p>
I want to build a 24x24 garage but do it in two steps. Is it safe to use a 12 foot 2x4 wall with the ridge pole on top of that and install the rafters to just one half. I plan to build a second 12x24 section next summer. My concern is whether the roof will be strong enough with just one half built. I was planning on a 6-12 pitch. My roof framework is 2x6 roof joists on 24&quot; centers and the walls are 2x4 on 12&quot; centers.
That was very informative and I liked your humor throughout. I have framed a couple small additions to my cabin in the past, using a framing book for guidance. I feel very comfortable building a garage myself now. My only change to your instructions, will be to use PBR, rather then Miller lite. Thanks for your great instructions.
Just wondering if you had checked into metal roofing (like I've seen installed on primitive cabins). It seems like it would go on a lot faster, but perhaps I'm wrong.
Does rebar just lie there on the gravel or is it elevated to be surrounded by concrete? If lifted, what with? Does rebar have to be tied?
Hi <br>The rebar must be elevated enough so the gravel that is contained in the wet concrete will fit under it. The minimum is 1&quot; and the maximum, for a 4&quot; thick concrete, should be 1-1/2&quot;. If you've got old concrete blocks, you can break them and use the pieces as supports, but make sure you tie the rebar to these or they'll fall off while pouring concrete! Other items would be used bricks, pieces of concrete. NO organic materials that will decompose should be used! If you want to spend some $ and do it nicely, go to a contractors supply house and ask for 'rebar chairs'. These come individually and in 5' strips, which can be cut to short pieces. <br> <br>Yes, the rebar needs to be tied together. This helps to keep it in place while you're pouring the wet concrete, and it does give strength. <br>The rebar must also overlap where it is tied/spliced together. The rule for how much overlap is: 18 x Diameter (in inches). So if you're using 1/2&quot; diameter rebar, 18 x 1/2&quot; = 9 inch overlap. If using #6 bar (rebar is named in 1/8&quot;, so #6 = 6/8&quot; or 3/4&quot; diameter) the required minimum overlap is 18 x .75, or 12&quot; overlap.
Building your own garage is tough. As soon as we got do the garage doors part of it I just let the pros come install it. <a href="http://www.thedoorworks.ca" rel="nofollow">garage doors</a>

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