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Step 8: Framing the overhead door header and top plate

With the other three walls framed, you will want to tackle the big overhead door opening. Since most of this wall is empty space, it is easier to build two little walls on each side with the jack studs for the main beam and then lift the overhead door header into place. You can nail the top plate in place across the king studs before lifting the main beam in order to add some rigidity to the walls before hefting the big beam. The sequence of sketches below give an idea of one way to do this.

You will want to include at least two jack studs on the ends (as pictured) in order to support the large span and mass of the header beam. You can either bond nail the two 2x12's that make up the header beam on the ground and lift them both or you can lift one in place, end nail it to the king studs, hold it in place and lift the other one up and bond nail and end nail it as well. My opinion is that nailing the header together first while heavier is easier if you can muscle it. You will want at least four people for this job. Two to lift the header from the ground, and two on ladders at each end to hold and nail the header in place. You should also toe nail the header to the jack studs for security while you finish the wall.

The final step in framing the header beam is to cut and place cripple studs between the top of the header beam and the top plate. End nail them to the top plate and toe nail them into the header beam.

Once all four walls are up, take your 2x4 bracing across the top plates off. Then measure and cut another set of 2x4's that will nail on top of the top plate to form a double top plate. At the ends, be sure to cut the 2x4's so that the topmost top plate will overlap the lower plate and connect the two walls together. While nailing on the double top plate, measure across the opposite corners of your four wall at the top. If the measurements are off, then your walls are not completely square. Get someone to help wrestle the walls and corners so that the measurements are close and the walls square before nailing on the top plate.

With the top plate on and the walls square, nail on corner braces across the top plates again. Double check that the walls are square by measuring across the garage corner to corner as in the sketch. Once you start sheathing it will be difficult to square up the building so take your time here.

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<p>This is awesome, such a thorough guide!</p><p>Also, great advice there in Step 11, I guess you learn something new every day.</p>
<p>Do you know how long a project like this usually takes? My sister and her husband have been wanting to build a garage outside their home for the past few weeks but they are traveling for the summer. They are trying to decide when would be the best time and how long it would take. I will have to pass these tips on to them though, thank you . </p><p>&lt;a href='http://www.toplinegarages.com.au/' &gt;&lt;/a&gt;</p>
The concrete takes a few days to do and then you need to let it cure a bit. Talk to the contractor on that, my guess is a week. <br><br>For us in MN, the best time to build is in September since it is still warm, one of the driest months, and less bugs. <br><br>If you have a slab with block and bolts for your sill plates, all the materials on-hand, a good set of plans, and a capable crew of 4-5 you could get the walls up, sheathed, windows in and the roof trussed and shingled in a weekend. After that, a day for electrical, a day for doors, and a day or two for siding. You could have a basic garage like mine done in a week. You only really need a crew for the walls and roof, I did the rest on my own on weekends and it took like 4 weekends or about 8-10 days of hard work.
<p>Would it be easier to do in the summer? I'm not sure if they have enough time with their jobs and kids to work on it themselves so it might be beneficial to hire someone for help. Although, doing it on the weekends seems like a great option. That way, friends and family can come and help if needed. </p>
<p>Please stop spamming Instructables.</p>
I want to build a 24x24 garage but do it in two steps. Is it safe to use a 12 foot 2x4 wall with the ridge pole on top of that and install the rafters to just one half. I plan to build a second 12x24 section next summer. My concern is whether the roof will be strong enough with just one half built. I was planning on a 6-12 pitch. My roof framework is 2x6 roof joists on 24&quot; centers and the walls are 2x4 on 12&quot; centers.
That was very informative and I liked your humor throughout. I have framed a couple small additions to my cabin in the past, using a framing book for guidance. I feel very comfortable building a garage myself now. My only change to your instructions, will be to use PBR, rather then Miller lite. Thanks for your great instructions.
Just wondering if you had checked into metal roofing (like I've seen installed on primitive cabins). It seems like it would go on a lot faster, but perhaps I'm wrong.
Does rebar just lie there on the gravel or is it elevated to be surrounded by concrete? If lifted, what with? Does rebar have to be tied?
Hi <br>The rebar must be elevated enough so the gravel that is contained in the wet concrete will fit under it. The minimum is 1&quot; and the maximum, for a 4&quot; thick concrete, should be 1-1/2&quot;. If you've got old concrete blocks, you can break them and use the pieces as supports, but make sure you tie the rebar to these or they'll fall off while pouring concrete! Other items would be used bricks, pieces of concrete. NO organic materials that will decompose should be used! If you want to spend some $ and do it nicely, go to a contractors supply house and ask for 'rebar chairs'. These come individually and in 5' strips, which can be cut to short pieces. <br> <br>Yes, the rebar needs to be tied together. This helps to keep it in place while you're pouring the wet concrete, and it does give strength. <br>The rebar must also overlap where it is tied/spliced together. The rule for how much overlap is: 18 x Diameter (in inches). So if you're using 1/2&quot; diameter rebar, 18 x 1/2&quot; = 9 inch overlap. If using #6 bar (rebar is named in 1/8&quot;, so #6 = 6/8&quot; or 3/4&quot; diameter) the required minimum overlap is 18 x .75, or 12&quot; overlap.
Building your own garage is tough. As soon as we got do the garage doors part of it I just let the pros come install it. <a href="http://www.thedoorworks.ca" rel="nofollow">garage doors</a>

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