Step 6: Lay out the platform

Because the decking came in 12' long boards, I made the treehouse 6' long. So you need to cut the decking in half, and lay it out. Leave a small gap between boards for drainage. Cut two of your 2×6 boards the same length as the decking, and the other four to the width of your decking less the thickness of two of the 2×6's (which will be more like 1 1/2" each).

How did the tree react to the galvanized bolts through the trunks? Did it display any indications of health issues or weakening? I imagine I'd have used stainless bolts instead.<br>Great treehouse!
<p>Just fine. Here's a photo of one of the holes after I removed the 1/2&quot; lag screw when I took down the treehouse after 4 years. No sign of disease or damage; just some squishing of the bark when it couldn't grow any further.</p>
That looks good, thanks :-)
<p>Great process, maybe someday for my kids. :) </p>
<p>Great job. I am getting started and your design looks like the best I have seen for my situation. In looking at your list of materials, you list 3-3/4&quot; diameter x 10&quot; long lag screws. Should the quantity be 4 instead of 3? How are you attaching the 2 x 8 to the other side of the tree trunk that has a 2 x 8 on both sides? Of course, the next question would be if you did add a lag screw where I am talking about, how do you keep that lag screw from interfering with the lag screw that attaches the other 2 x 8?</p>
<p>The 3 10&quot; long ones were used for the 2 trees at one end and for the braces. The 2 8&quot; screws were used on the single tree. Remember that these have to go through the 2 x 8 and leave some room for growth, so in the treehouse shown each of these penetrate the 12&quot; trunk about 5 1/2&quot; only. If your tree is smaller, you could simply offset the lag screws slightly in height. Good luck with the build.</p>
Thanks! Sorry, I thought the 2-8&quot; screws were to be used on the 2 x 4 diagonals. What is your opinion on 5/8&quot; diameter lag screws instead of 3/4&quot;? So far 5/8&quot; is the largest size I can buy individually.
<p>Well, this treehouse survived for 4 years just fine with 1/2&quot; lag screws, but these trees grow slowly and don't move much in wind. Fastenal.com has the 3/4&quot; ones available online.</p>
<p>do you know what property class have these lag screws? so I can know their resistance...</p>
<p>See <a href="https://www.fastenal.com/content/product_specifications/LAG.HDG.pdf" rel="nofollow">https://www.fastenal.com/content/product_specifications/LAG.HDG.pdf</a> </p>
<p>One other thing to note is...what kind of tree you are building this on? Pine and poplar trees are very soft and may lose the lag screws. Oak, hickory, ash and elm are much sturdier and will be structurally more sound. Look into what kind of trees you will be dealing with. Looks like fun. </p>
<p>Oak (see step 1)</p>
<p>Excellent work!</p>
<p>The only issue is that having the house attached to the tree it will always break in time. Trees are always growing and moving wiht the wheather. Google and find tecnhiques that will leave a treehouse free from the tree and lasting longer.</p>
<p>Of course, which is why this instructable contains information on how to mitigate these effects. If you're looking for a house on stilts that you can put near a tree, I recommend seamster's <a href="http://www.instructables.com/id/Backyard-Fort/" rel="nofollow">Backyard Fort</a>.</p>
<p>dreams come true:-)</p>
<p>nice </p>
<p>nice </p>
<p>nice </p>
<p>nice </p>
<p>i will play in thayre :)</p>
<p>Thanks, this is one of the best tree house instructables out there. I'm my first tree house deep in the forest where I have to hike all the materials in so I'm trying to do as much reading as I can before hand. I'm curious how your tree growth has impacted you design and if you would have made any changes because of that? I'm putting short galvanized pipe on my main bolts to make a sizeable gap between the tree and the frame of the tree house.</p>
<p>Ha, funny you asked; the tree has just grown to the point where I'm right now (well, on weekends) in the process of taking it down. I'm going to put it back up using bigger bolts (probably 1&quot;) and perch the treefort supports a little further away to give it more room to grow (see my commentary at the end of step 4). I'm not sure why you're adding the pipe, though - it won't help the strength any - or are you putting the supports on TOP of the pipe to allow movement at one end?</p>
I read about the pipe method in one of Pete Nelson's books, it basically serves the same purpose as a big stack of washers or the collar of a tree house attachment bolt. I'm probably not describing it well, if it all works I will post an instructable.
<p>Look forward to seeing it.</p>
<p>Thanks so much! I had already started all wrong and after seeing yours with the 2x10 underneath and freeing the 2x8 from the tree movement I was able to do a quick fix to make mine much sturdy. Thanks.</p>
Thanks for you insight. I used your plans as a source. Although my treefort does not resemble yours on the outside, it does have some similarity. <br> <br>Here is a link to my Treefort: http://kurt-zeppetello.blogspot.com/2013/08/tree-house-or-fort-construction.html <br>
Nice job, it looks great. You should consider writing it up as instructable (you've done all the work already!) and entering it in the Fort contest on right now.
Sorry, I see someone else asked this below, and you answered it!
Ha, well spotted, I'd forgotten myself. The fact that two people asked means I probably should edit that step to explain myself better...
How can rafter ties be used when the angle between the &quot;perpendicular&quot; 2 X 6 boards is not square (i.e. not perpendicular at all but several degrees off)?
If you look at the first photo in Step 8, you'll notice that the rafter tie is not flush to the wood as I'm nailing it. However, it provided very little resistance to widening the angle beyond 90&deg;, so I guess I just hammered it open slightly as I was nailing.
Just wanted to reach out and say thanks. My 11 year old son has been bugging me for a year for a tree house, and while I'm okay with tools, taking this task on was proving daunting. These are great instructions and I have modified based on needs. Got the joist attached to the tress today. Moving on to the frame next weekend. Thanks!
Thanks, I appreciate it. Best of luck with the build; let me know if you have any questions as you go along.
This has been such a good post! Thank you so much! I think I could only do this if I hired a <a href="http://www.affiliatedroofers.ca/services/residential-roofing/" rel="nofollow">roofer in Vancouver</a>! Thanks again!
Good Father. Congratulation!!!!
Question about the rafter ties. In my configuration, the 2x10s and 2x6s are not at right angles. How did you manage to attach the rafter ties? Did you somehow bend each of them to match the angle of the join? Or were your angles close enough that it did not require any modification?
Mine were pretty close, and yeah, I just hammered them flat. Good luck with the build!
this how-to was really easy to follow. cool stuff. The attached images showed my finished product. Kids are having a blast! <br>Just need the basket with the pulley now, and perhaps a zip line. <br> <br>All fun stuff. Thanks,
Great job! Looks really good, and you have pretty much the perfect tree for it, too.
That is a legit tree house
this is great my dad keeps on saying he will make a tree house he never does
You have some very lucky/fortunate kids to have a dad to make them so many awesome things! I love all your instructables - esp the bed - this one and the rubik's cube drawers! AMAZING!!!!!
Many thanks Holly, glad you like them. Making things for your kids is super rewarding, as no doubt you've found yourself!
Great designs on your tree house. Simple and attractive and unique. Nowadays there are many type of designs on building a tree house but for me having a simple tree house is enough and attractive especially for kids. Actually I have seen many kinds of house designs here (http://buildatreehouse.org), tried on using there various tips on house designs.
Good job on sharing how to build your tree house. You can also add treehouse kits for your tree house to add some essence. I have bumped into a site which they sell tree house kits also kits for kids which is cool (http://buildatreehouse.org). They also have tips on how to build a tree house which I also used for my tree house building.
Great post on how to build a tree house. It's really important for a builder to know what kind of tree or where you would build your tree house. Of course you have to choose a tree that's strong and big enough to be build. There is also some tips on how to build a tree house here (http://buildatreehouse.org) if you want some cool, various tips. Nice job on your tree house.
I have 10 aceres. about 2.5 is forstry. I have 2 forts. 1 in the trees and 1 on poles me and my sis have wars. im still upgrading my forts with rails, shelves, airsoft gun turrets, ext
And i keep a dune buggy under it

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Bio: By day, I teach and document solutions to problems. By night... hmm. I should probably get out more.
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