Instructables
Picture of How to fix a YLOD PS3... with an oven.
To start, I'll first just admit that I have always been an XBOX 360 fan boy. I have done my fair share of ridiculing the PS3, and even deterred people from buying one. But that was all before Gran Turismo 5, which literally had me convinced at first sight that a PS3 was something that I had to own. So, I bought one. A broken one. A YLOD one. Now, some might think that was a stupid choice, with good reason.

However, because I was an XBOX fan, I was very familiar with the Red Rings of Death, or RROD for short. And because I am an aspiring engineer and experienced tinkerer, I had gotten very familiar (and very good) at fixing consoles with this problem, thanks to the many helpful tutorials posted on sites like xbox-experts.com. Once I discovered that the YLOD is basically the same problem as the RROD, I made the choice to buy a broken PS3 and fix it. This tutorial explains how I did it, using tips, tricks, and methods I have used to fix XBOX's in the past.

BE AWARE THAT PERFORMING THE METHOD WILL VOID VOID VOID YOUR WARRANTY (which is probably expired anyway if you are fixing a launch console). I will also say right now that I AM NOT RESPONSIBLE for any damage you may do to your PS3 or your oven (I'm talking about a conventional kitchen oven BTW, not a microwave!) by following this guide, and I do not guarantee a fixed console. But I will say that if you follow this guide, your chances are good.
 
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Step 1: Background & Theory

Picture of Background & Theory
So what causes the YLOD? There are several prevailing theories, including a faulty power supply, corrupted hard drive, or virus circulating through the PSN (which is probably 100% false). But, while I'm not saying that these AREN'T the cause of your particular case of YLOD, I will say that most likely, the cause of your issue are the solder balls underneath the RSX (basically the GPU, or Graphics Processing Unit) and  Cell BE (basically the CPU, or Central Processing Unit) chips. These can be seen in the picture on this page. This style of fastening the chips to the board is know as BGA, or Ball Grid Array. What you really need to know though, is that under the chips their are hundreds of tiny balls of solder, which pass information from the chip to the motherboard. These balls are constantly submitted to intense heat due to the chip above them, which is being cooled by a huge heat-sink and fan.

This would all be hunky dory, except for the lead free solder which composes the chips. The European Union, a political and economic union of 27 countries, banned the importation of electronics containing lead in 2006, which has caused most electronics manufactures to switch to lead free solder in their products, even those sold in the U.S. (thanks to Entropy512 for the information). Unfortunately lead free solder has two (theorized) weaknesses. The first is that with repeated, high temperature (higher than what Sony engineers intended) exposure caused by 8 hour Call of Duty marathons or similar,  followed by rapid cooling of the console once turned off, the balls begin to lose their elasticity, and eventually crack. This causes an open circuit, and when you try and power the PS3 up again, you are greeted with the YLOD. The other theory is that over time, due to the aforementioned high temperatures, the balls begin to grow "tin whiskers" which cause a short with another ball nearby, once again causing the YLOD. Which actual cause it really is doesn't matter, because the method I outline here will fix both.

This magical method is known as an oven re-flow. In a nutshell, the oven is used to heat the PS3 motherboard up to a temperature high enough to melt the solder balls underneath the RSX and Cell BE chips. When the board cools, the balls are reformed  with the help of flux, which gives them back their elasticity. Don't worry, the oven will not get hot enough to "liquefy" the solder and cause it to pool into one giant glob, but only enough to cause it to "goo up" and reform each individual ball.
After the re flow, high quality thermal paste can be used to increase the PS3's cooling efficiency and lessen the chance of the YLOD reoccurring. More info on and clarification will be given on this later.

Now, the last thing is to "critique" other methods of fixing the YLOD. The main one that you may have heard of is the heat-gun method, which works, but has several downfalls, the first of which in my mind is the price. A heat-gun costs like 50 bucks at your local hardware store. The oven method is almost free - all you need are some basic supplies, which are less than 20 bucks. The other big downfall is that the heat-gun warps the motherboard because it heats one area while other areas stay cool. This means that when you put the warped board back in the case and bolt it all in, it puts stress on the new solder balls, which is never good and will help to cause failure in the future. The oven method avoids this by EVENLY heating all areas of the board, keeping flex very minimal. The other "trick" I have heard of is using a blow dryer to heat up the innards of the console. While this also works, it does not re-flow, but instead will un-flex the motherboard over its whole area (similar to the low temp. oven bake detailed later in the instructable), which causes a temporary re-alignment of the cracked solder balls. However, after a few cycles of hard gaming, the board will warp back to the way it was, and the console will fail once again. The best way to fix  BGA related failure is to use a professional re-flow station and griddle, but these cost big bucks, and would be pointless to buy for a one time fix.

Alright, lets do it.

Step 2: Supplies & Disassembly

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Alright, so the following is what you will need:
- Four M4 X 30mm hex  bolts
- Eight matching M4 hex nuts
- Two M5 X 30mm hex bolts
- Four matching M5 hex nuts
- One pack of Blu Tack, Sticky Tack, or similar (can be found at Walmart)
- Rubbing Alcohol
- No clean flux (get on ebay and search "flux RROD YLOD" and you should find the stuff. It     comes in a small bottle with a pipet)
- Goo Gone Extreme, Goof Off, or similar
- Q-tips and Paper Towels (or Napkins)
- Aluminum Foil
- Arctic Silver 5 Thermal Compound (can be found at Radio Shack) OR if you're on a budget, you can get the cheaper ceramic based compound. It should still be an improvement over the stock paste, but AS5 will be better if you can spring for it.
-Oven thermometer (these are like $3 at Walmart, please please please use one if you want to eliminate all chances of melting components)
-A box fan or equivalent

As for disassembly of the PS3, I wont provide instructions because their are many good tutorials out there. My personal favorite is this chain of videos, which is actually a heat-gun tutorial. The guy does a great job of showing not only how to disassemble, but reassemble, the PS3.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4_Ic1_TY-GU&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vr1zyAGwnuU&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VHgCa3XEPic&feature=related

Step 3: Board Preperation

So once you've stripped the PS3 all the way down to the board, there's a few things you need to do. Firstly, the old and probably dried up thermal paste on the RSX and Cell BE chips needs to be cleaned off. This paste transfers the heat from the chips to the heat sink, and if your PlayStation's paste looked like mine did, it's obvious it wasn't doing its job. To clean it, drip a little bit of Goo Gone onto the chip you're cleaning and let it sit for about 30 seconds. This will dissolve the old compound. Then wipe it away with a paper towel, and repeat. To get the edges of the chip, soak a Q-tip with Goo Gone and wipe them off. When it's clean, wipe it down with rubbing alcohol. There are pictures on this page of me doing this, if you want to see the technique. Also clean the metal pads on the heat-sink using this same method.

After the chips are clean, all the thermal pads on the board should be removed. Be careful - some may be stuck to the metal plate that covers the top of the motherboard - make sure they either stay on it, or you pull them off and put them with their siblings that you took off the motherboard. Also, if you're fixing a backwards compatible 60GB model, be VERY CAREFUL when removing the thermal pad from the PS2 chip. It seems to be very gooey and easy to tear - I included a picture of mine after I got it off - you can see what I mean. Also remove the silver strip on top of a small BGA chip (it can be seen in my pictures) and the spongy metal looking thing on top of one of the ports on the back of the board.

Step 4: Low Temperature Oven Bake

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Alright, so the purpose of this step is twofold. First, it helps to gently unflex the mainboard, and second, it serves to evaporate moisture that has trapped itself in the board over time, which is critical to get rid of in order to perform a good re-flow. However, the motherboard can't just be tossed on a pizza tray and then into the oven. This is where the bolts come in. They will be used to create a simple stand for the board, so no parts of it will be directly touching the tray.

First, put a nut about 10mm down on a bolt you are going to use. The smaller M4 bolts go around the outside of the board, and the M5's go in two of the big holes in the middle (see pictures). Then, place it in a hole on the board. Now, take another nut and screw it down until the top of the nut is flush with the top to the bolt. Then tighten the nut underneath the board until it "pinches" the board tightly. No need to crank down on these - finger tightening  is good enough. Do this for all the bolts. Make sure when you do the M5's that the nut on top of the board does not come into contact with any chips or other small components.

Then, set the board on an even surface like a counter-top. You want to look straight on at the board and make sure it is level. If it sags or curves in the middle, adjust the middle bolts so that it does not.

Once this is done, it's time to cook. Preheat the oven to 150 degrees Fahrenheit. If your oven will not go this low, you can go as high as 170 without insulation, but any higher and you risk damaging the board. If you simply cannot get your oven to do this you can skip this step, but it is very beneficial to do it if possible.

Alright, when the oven is ready put the board on a pizza tray and pop it in the oven for 8 HOURS. That's right, 8 hours. This ensures a completely dry and straight board, and is totally worth the wait. If possible start the bake early - then you will have time to re-flow later in the same day.

Once the wait is over, take the mainboard out of the oven and let it cool completely. Now it's time to insulate.


Step 5: Insulation and Fluxing

Really the only things on the board that need to be insulated are the capacitors, which are very susceptible to heat. The ports, which I insulated during my reflow, are much hardier than I expected (I left one uncovered) and do not need to be insulated. So, if you see extra insulation in my pictures, it's just ports, which can be ignored.

I have also read about people cooking the board without ANY insulation. Honestly this worries me, and I don't think I could bring myself to do this. However, I did decide to go with "light" insulation compared to typical XBOX 360 insulation because of these reports, and it seemed to work well.

This is where the sticky tack comes in. This stuff has excellent heat resistivity, and is mold-able, which is handy. Just take it and surround all capacitors on the board. Try to keep it off of big chips and mold it as compactly as you can while still leaving about .25 of an inch of thickness around the capacitors. Once this is done cover all the globs in foil, SHINY SIDE OUT. This will help to reflect the heat.

EDIT 8/24/11 - thanks to graphicsgod, I have become aware of some possible melting hazards on the board. I highly recommend insulating the component cable jack, along with the small cylindrical piezospeaker (can be seen in the first picture) in the same way you insulated the caps.

This completes the insulation, and leaves one final step before re-flowing - fluxing. The flux re-conditions the solder balls and gives them back their flexibility and strength. You need a very specific type - No Clean. This stuff does not need to be cleaned off the board like other types of flux (which eat into the solder pads to help the solder "stick") and is very liquidy. The type of choice is Kester 951, which can be had on eBay in small bottles. Just search "flux YLOD" and you'll find it. To use it, you basically take the pipet and squirt flux under the chips you wish to reflow. Now, in reality every part of the board will be reflowed, but we only need to flux the parts that have become fatigued and failed, causing the YLOD. I have outlined these specific chips in red in two of the pictures.

Here's a video which shows how to flux a 360 - the method will work for the PS3. And you don't need to be shy with this stuff - make sure you have gotten it under the chips.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h2R_NqF5wAc

Once done, we're finally ready to re-flow.

Step 6: Reflowing

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EDIT 8/24/11 - I have revised this step to use a much more efficient reflow technique. Trust me, it's better and safer.

SHORT THEORY:
After reading a few articles on the reflow ovens used in industry, I realized that the method I was using was clunky and far from ideal.

In a perfect situation, a reflow should minimize time spent above the solder melting point, while still reaching a temperature somewhat above this melting point. The shorter the time, the less brittle the solder. Reaching the correct temperature ensures the solder "sticks" correctly. Also, the board must be the same temperature across its area so it does not warp.

When you plot these criteria against time, you get what's called a reflow profile. I have created one for the average home oven, which I've uploaded. Please ignore the "Soak" step - it is unnecessary due to the slowness of the oven.

So here's a quick run through of the profile: the board goes in the oven cold, and is kept in while the oven approaches the reflow temperature. This ensures the board is the same temperature everywhere (because the oven heats up slowly, giving the heat enough time to penetrate and soak all areas). As the reflow temperature is reached and surpassed, the solder melts. Once the correct temperature above the solder melting point is reached, the door is opened and a fan is used to gently draw hot air away from the face of the oven, which shortens the time the solder is liquid by speeding its cool-down.

An oven thermometer is used to 1) ensure accurate temperature readings, allowing for shorter times spent with the solder liquid, and most importantly 2) to make sure the oven does not reach a temperature that is much hotter than what it reports (some can go over by 20F or more).

THE ACTUAL STEPS:

Well, the time has finally come. Place the PS3 board on a counter top like you did when you prepped it for the low temp bake and check to make sure it is level. Then, put it on a pizza tray.

Put the motherboard in on the middle rack, towards the front of your oven. Place the thermometer you hopefully purchased in the oven, where you can see it through the door. Turn the temperature up to 500 degrees Fahrenheit. Relax. The oven will not reach this temperature. Take a seat on the floor and watch the thermometer. Once the needle rolls to approximately 460F, turn off the oven an throw open the door. The thermometer will rise a few degrees before it falls. Do not panic.

Take a box fan, osculating fan (set to not osculate), or similar, put it on its lowest setting, and place it OUTSIDE THE EDGE OF THE OVEN DOOR TO THE LEFT OR RIGHT, NOT DIRECTLY IN FRONT, WITH THE FAN BLOWING AIR AWAY FROM, I REPEAT, AWAY FROM THE OVEN, AND NOT NOT NOT INTO IT. The idea here is the pull hot air from the face of the oven, without creating any significant disturbance to the motherboard within. This will speed up the cool down, as explained in the theory. Once the board is close to room temp, feel free to remove it.

Congratulations! You've re-flowed your PS3. 

Step 7: Board Preparation and Re-assembly

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You're on the home stretch now. To get the board ready for reassembly, you first need to remove the sticky tack and foil. It shouldn't leave too much residue on the board - if it does, just be patient and get as much off as you can. Nothing bad will happen if you leave a little on the board - it is an excellent electrical insulator.

Next, put some new thermal compound on the RSX and Cell BE chips. I recommend Arctic Silver 5 - it is much better than the stock compound. Just be careful - it has microscopic pieces of silver in it, and will CONDUCT ELECTRICITY. So keep it on the chips. To apply it, I usually put a glob on a chip, and then take a credit card or something similar and spread it out. You don't want very much - a paper thin layer will suffice. The pics I provided show about what your's should look like.

Next, put all the thermal pads you took off back on the board. Don't forget any! If you do, you could nuke an important component and kill your PS3.

The last thing I want to mention is a trick I found in a YouTube video. The little bendy clamps that hold the heat-sink to the chips (there should be two) can be bent slightly more to increase the pressure they "pull" with, which should increase the thermal efficiency of the PS3. They are really hard to bend, but a little extra bend goes a long way, so don't overdo it. I included a picture showing me bending the clamps.

Use the video's I linked to earlier to reassemble. And now, the moment of truth.

Step 8: The Green Light

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Hopefully you will see what I saw when I turned on my PS3. If not, perhaps your YLOD is caused by a power supply issue or something, which I will not go into here. If you still believe it's the solder balls, you could try sending it to a professional reflower or get if re-balled, but this will unfortunately cost you. But if you saw a beautiful green light like I did - congrats, you have fixed your PS3. Now try to keep it in an open area where it can breath cool air, and have fun :)
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buddyslack1 month ago

Gave this a try but unfortunatly still had YLOD so tried again leaving in the oven a bit longer, put back together and still YLOD. On the plus side I can take apart and put back together a ps3 real quick now

Treagle3501 month ago

Thank you, This guide has proven to be really practical. My ps3 is now working again after the fix. But I had to use the standard AV multi out cables to get video. I will now try to use HDMI but video reset has proven of no use so far. Thus my search continues ...

kdigre1 month ago

Do I need to use blutak or can I use generic adhesive putty?

MCStrider3 months ago

Very nice work, much appreciated! My fat ps3 got YLOD first time about 18 months ago. I followed the instructions here (up to 450 degrees) and got it working again. Lasted about 8 months, then hit YLOD again. Did the process again, though let it get a bit warmer (up to 460+). Worked and lasted about 10 months, then YLOD again. Followed the process again, but used lots more flux (lots of excess on the board). Bought a new stand alone oven thermometer (for $6) and it seemed to be about 30-40 degrees behind the oven temp display (wasn't sure if this was due to the placement of the stand alone, or if one or both were a bit inaccurate). I trusted the stand alone, but had to set the oven up to 520 to get the stand alone up to 460. When I pulled the board out, some of the plastic connectors were melted (the HDMI connector and the big 2 prong connector that connects to the power supply). I suspect the temp got well above 460. Had to break off some of the melted plastic to get it back together - but everything fit OK. Confidence was not high it'd work this time (3rd time + melted parts...), but tried it out and it lives again! (note that it's only been running for one day...) Suggestion - get an accurate thermometer (or 2) and test them in the oven without the ps3 board in it....

sjgusmc214 months ago

Thank you for this great guide! I have a 7 year old Fat PS3 with 30 GB hd and it bit the bullet 2 days ago. Followed your guide and worked like a champ! I couldn't find the blue tack stuff, so I used white playdough instead and it worked great! Thank you again!

NeuroPulse11 months ago
My PS3 does not have YLOD. I get a green light and can navigate the menus, but when I launch a game or app the screen turns black and stays that way. Does that problem have the same cause as YLOD?

Make sure all your wires are correctly in, the CD drives main wires have a tendency to slip out. Make sure to snap the wires in well.

deeelwy7 months ago

My PS3 recently died with the weird blinking red light and the three beeps. After, some googling this is called a YLOD despite my PS3 not actually having a yellow LED. I guess when sony made the PS3 cheaper they ditched the yellow light for a blinking red one. Some more googling found this page. So for about $15 worth of supplies I followed your instructions except I only dried and unwarped my board for 2 hours instead of 8. To my amzement it actually worked! I couldn't believe it. Not only does it work, but it is also about 3 or 4 times faster at starting up and loading the menu. I created an account on this site just so I could post this, Thanks!

red and green make yellow.

tisaconundrum6 months ago

PS3 finally died :P Lol, i'll be fixing it again at some point.

PS3 is finally up and running again, I'd like to stress some keypoints!

The screws should all be of equal length! This will ensure that you're board straightens out correctly.
Second, the pizza board that you use should also be straight. If it's thin, this is good. the board will naturally straighten out from the heat.
Third, don't use the tack consecutive times for cooking, it begins to decay rapidly and will start sticking to your components.
Fourth, make sure you seal up the components jack! it will melt, I had the displeasure of dealing with that.
Fifth, Don't ever force your PS3 back into the casing, this will certainly break a solder ball somewhere. This isn't a big deal as you can bake the PS3 again, just be sure that you're PS3 is straight to begin with.


PS: I suggest buying all same screws (to keep consistent height), just make sure you're nuts are big enough to NOT fit through the holes of the PS3.

aredding16 months ago
I love you. I successfully fixed my Yellow Light of Don't-work-none with this guide. Thank you very much for all the great info.
rt1247 months ago

Hi, I have been reburbishing ps3s for over 3 years and previously used a heat gun for reflows. I had less than 25% success rate and for the most part when I got a ps3 with YLOD, NO VIDEO I would just throw them away. Since reading this I have begun reflowing ps3s again, my success rate in now 90% or higher. Thank you., I could of saved myself, and made a lot more money!

tisaconundrum7 months ago

Here I am again :D And my PS3 has not failed yet :D
I thank you again for this instructable.

PhiPhi899 months ago
Let me first say that although I frequent instructables.com I just now created an account to express my gratitude.

THANK YOU!!!
I was definitely skeptical of this procedure, so I put it off until I had run out of options (i.e. blow dryer with box, replacing therm paste and using blow dryer, etc..).
Yesterday I finally decided to give it a go. I followed the procedure exactly with 3 exceptions: 1) Oven was at 170 not 150, and 2) like phoneman6m7 (couldn't tag for some reason) my oven beeped at 450 saying preheat was complete--I waited just 5 mins longer; and 3) I should have listened about the insulating the component port....

To my dismay: when I opened the oven after the 500F bake smoke came pouring out, and boy did it smell! When the m-board finally cooled, I turned it over... and there was a big burnt spot! I almost trashed it right there :( I believe I may have used too much flux and it pooled and cooked. Despite my sadness I scrubbed and scrubbed the residue with shop towels and alcohol for about 30mins... I removed as much as I could, but there was still hard black carbon caked on a couple spots. I figured it was pointless, but I re-assembled the unit and plugged in the power for kicks.... IT WORKED!
....I was speechless.... Thank you Formulajake88! Thank you, thank you, thank you. I played a round of BO2, and it was flawless. :):):)

The only issue I had was: since I did not insulate the component input, it melted. I had to carve off pieces of the hardened plastic so that the m-board would fit back into the chassis.
I have a friend who also has YLOD, so I may be doing this again in the near future. Best of luck to all of you!
mixmanuk10 months ago
Many thanks for this article it worked a treat. It was the most thorough one I found and explained why certain other methods are not advisable and won't last as long. I wasn't looking for a quick fix as I'd like my original 60 GB to last me a lot longer if possible.
If you're following this from the UK (where I am) IPA (Isopropyl Alcohol) is not easy to come by...I found mine in Maplins, Servisol IPA 170...£10 mind you!
I used Ever Build Wonder Wipes to clean the majority of the compound off and then rubbed over with some IPA.
Also I got my no clean flux from Maplins..in the form of a pen (can see being used in this video http://youtu.be/MZRReDIHTe0) again £10.
I did the full bake for 8 hours at 65°C and then the actual reflow upto 235°C.
I used the instructions here (http://psxrepair.com/taking_apart_the_ps3) for the dismantling of the PS3.
Once again many thanks
NeuroPulse11 months ago
Greetings. I advise adding to use liquid no-clean flux. Put it under the CPU and GPU from the sides of the chips with a syringe.
grazer1 year ago
I think something went wrong in the oven, when I opened it, a cloud of smoke rose out... So I took it outside to settle and cool down, I hope it will work...
Followed your instructions to a t, except for the oven temperature, I end up doing 400 degrees. in the end it was successful.
Note: no you do not need the solder liquid, it helps though. other alternatives to Blu Tack, fun tack. make sure your pan is straight, my motherboard ended up warping a little bit. make sure you clean your mother board well or else it well get really smokey in the oven.
I've fixed two First Gen 80GB consoles multiple times with this method and it works every time. You become very efficient at this once you've done it a few times, but don't forget to make sure you've insulated and done all the steps (except for the long bake if you arent concerned about it). Thanks for the steps!
So many thanks!! It really worked for me! I had a 60GB ps3 that would turn on and show a green light, but no video/audio and no controller connection at all. I think this 'green light of death' is almost the same as the well-known YLOD, but not enough to let the playstation show te yellow light sign. So for people with the same problem, this works!
You only have to press and hold the button, to reset the display action. Lolz
ringo_961 year ago
The lowest setting my oven has is 170 degrees farenheit, but the oven thermometer I bought is reading 190F when set at 170. How long should I do the long bake at this temp?
Also, I bought some yellow sticky tack made by the Super Glue company. That should work just as well, right? I am assuming it's the same stuff...
Lastly, I took my PS3 in to a repair shop where they repaired it once and that lasted about 3 weeks. Then I took it back (warranty) and they couldn't fix it a second time, although I can't be sure they actually tried a second time. I am hoping to get the unit working (via your method) long enough to transfer data from the defective PS3 to my new one. Have you ever heard of people having success with this type of situation? I think they did a "reflow" the first time.
You could just pull the data out if the drive by sticking it in your computer and then using a Linux live CD pull the data out.
Can you name some alternatives to blue tak, because there is no such thing where I live
jarelll1 year ago
I don't know if you mentioned it ... But people please remember to remove your battery from the motherboard .. I popped mine in the oven loolll
mgardener1 year ago
Ok I have done this twice and it has extended my PS3 life by about 6-8 months so far! Just gone YLOD again today so wondering how many times this will work. Going to give it a go again anyway and see if it lasts until the new Xbox comes out (yeah...Im going to swap to the dark side...Sony havent exactly impressed me!). Still, Im on 378 hours of PS3 battlefield 3 so Im not giving up yet!
rdouglas1 year ago
Used this method 3 times now on an original PS3 FAT backwards compatible and getting more slap dash each time. Just done my third 'cook' with little hope and zero insulation - worked! All I need the machine to do is last an hour or so to let me back up all my stuff and I'll be happy. Great post so big kudos sir! And for everyone that's a little concerned about trying it - what do you have to lose?
ChinaMike1 year ago
I am sure having a cat nearby is also part of the inventory to do this? ;)
WhiteMerve1 year ago
Could any one confirm if there's anything i need to differently with the ps3 slim?

Also I've found a kit on eBay which comes with some copper shims to put between the gpu and cpu to help with cooling, has any one tried anything like this ?
ac_23001 year ago
So, here is my report on this:

As german Blu-Tack alternative I used Pritt Multifix. It left some residue, but I could clean that with some electronic cleaner. Forgot isolating the Multi-AV and it melted though.
I used the two power pins as a stand, because I hadn't enough screws at home. Bad idea, because it fall off under the board's pressure at about 200 C/390 F and I couldn't reattach it.
Also, the board was uneven afterwards, because I didn't use screws in the middle of the board.
With some force and metal bending I could put the PS3 back together. But I got the blinking red light.
At the end of all that I found two little chips on the pizza tray. Must have fallen off under the heat or something. My thermometer was at about 235 C/455 F when I turned it off.
Anyway, maybe someone learns from my mistakes.
9lucky21 year ago
Success!
rcamus1 year ago
This was a fail for me. I used to get the YLOD error and shutdown, but after going through the process, I now have a dead (no lights, no beeps) PS3. Anyone have any ideas on what might have gone wrong?
asbas531 year ago
First of all, I would like to thank you very much for making this guide. I got the cursed YLOD after having my 40gb for about 7 years now. Followed everything to a "T", except for the final step where you use the fan to suck out the hot air. I understand that it helps the solder solidify better, however I was worried about the motherboard itself, and tried a different method for the final cooling. Anyway, it worked for me!! On the second day now, and cranked right up no problem. I'll try posting back later for an update. I just hope it lasts unti PS4!! THANKS AGAIN!!
rcamus1 year ago
does it make a difference if it is a gas or electric oven? The gas ovens seem to heat up faster
I am willing to try this because u wanna get back to Black Ops 2XD. I've recently got this a couple day ago at first i was like WTF!?! but then i found this page it seem pretty straight to do it
rudi91 year ago
I did everything and i fixed it but when i tried to play a game once more it turned off and afterall same thing the YLOD is back! -.-
mking201 year ago
Success!!!!!!!! I can't actually believe this worked but we spent most of the day preparing for it, we put my brothers broken PS3 (yellow light of death) into the oven (Motherboard only) and cooked it at 460F and then reassembled it and now its working again!!!!!

Thanks a million!!!!!
A friend of mine mentioned that his old PS3 had karked it a while ago and instead of trying to send it back to Sony or trying to fix it himself he decided to just fork out for a new slim version, since they are reasonably cheap these days. He had heard about various methods of getting it working again (the heat gun method), but he didn't really want to bother with it, so his old one was still gathering dust. He told me about this and said I could have the PS3 if I wanted to have a crack at trying to fix it.

Now I'm a PC gamer from way back, I enjoy picking out components and building my own machines, and so have never really been that interested in console gaming. In saying that, every so often I do come across a game that is not available on the PC that I would like to play (Uncharted 3, Gran Turismo 5), so thought I might as well give it a nudge - at the very least it would give us a blu-ray player at home... :-). So I took his machine and started to do some research into the problem and came across this article, which seemed like a very well researched and thought out method, and the pros/cons versus the heat gun method made a lot of sense to me. (Plus I'm cheap and didn't feel like forking out for a heat gun).

Over the last couple of weeks I've followed the steps outlined here, pulled the machine apart & given it a thorough cleaning (talk about filthy). Did the 8 hour low temp bake over two 4 hour evening sessions at 170F as that was the lowest the oven went. Insulated and ramped up to 460F last night, and when I put the machine back together it looks like it is all working perfectly! Amazing. I don't actually have a controller or a game to test it out with yet - he kept that stuff when he bought his new PS3. I'm going to borrow a game/controller this weekend, give it a good burn in with Uncharted or something and see how she holds up. If it all looks good then will invest in my own controller and game on..

Thanks a lot for documenting this method as you have, much appreciated!
mgardener1 year ago
YLOD once again after 3 months from this fix and fairly heavy use. Did it again and found out the weak point was application of the thermal adhesive. I wouldnt try and spread it out evenly, just add a few small stripes near the centre and allow it to squidge out evenly over the processor areas. Repeated the fix and Im back online once more!
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